Times and Seasons, 15 September 1842

  • Source Note
Page 920
that they may be put in the archives of my Holy Temple, to be held in remembrance from generation to generation, saith the Lord of Hosts.
I will say to all the saints, that I desired with exceeding great desire, to have addressed them from the stand, on the subject of baptism for the dead, on the following sabbath. But inasmuch as it is out my power to do so, I will write the word of the Lord from time to time, on that subject, and send it you by mail, as well as many others things.
I now close my letter for the present, for the want of more time: for the enemy is on the alert, and as the Savior said, the prince of this world cometh, but he hath nothing in me.
Behold my prayer to God is, that you all may be saved. And I subscribe myself your servant in the Lord, prophet and seer of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints.
JOSEPH SMITH.
 
————
MOB LAW.
In order to give the community a fair understanding of the treatment which the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, has received from the government where it has been located, we shall revert to scenes gone by, and documents already published:—And in the first place, in union with the Declaration of Independence, “we hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable rights; that among these are life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness;” and that the constitution of the and of the several states, save Louisiana, have ample provisions made for the enjoyment of religious liberty.
It can not have been forgotten so soon, that oppression, and a want of the liberty of conscience, were among the first agrievances that caused our government to usher into existence; nor should it be less a matter of surprise, that the sons of the fathers of our freedom, should have become so soon tainted with that tyranny, cruelty, oppression, and inhumanity which has overwhelmed and ruined kingdom after kingdom, and nation after nation—but so it is—and in 1838, without cause, the inhabitants of , Missouri, signed the first specimen of mob law, from which we make the following extracts:—
“We, the undersigned. citizens of , believing that an important crisis is at hand, as regards our civil society, in consequence of a pretended religious sect of people, that have settled and are still settling in our , styling themselves Mormons: and intending as we do to rid our society, peaceably if we can, forcibly if we mnst: and believing as we do, that the arm of the civil law does not afford us a guarantee, or at least a sufficient one, against the evils which are now inflicted upon us, and seem to be increasing by the said religious sect; deem it expedient and of the highest importance, to form ourselves into a company for the better and easier accomplishment of our purpose; a purpose which we deem it almost superfluous to say, is justified as well by the law of nature as by the law of self-preservation.”
“They openly blasheme the most High God and cast contempt upon His Holy Religion, by pretending to receive Revelations direct from Heaven—by pretending to speak in unknown tongues by direct inspiration.”
“We therefore agree, that after timely warning, and upon receiving an adequate compensation for what little property they cannot take with them, they refuse to leave us in peace as they found us, we agree to use such means as may be sufficient to remove them. And to that end, we severally pledge to each other, our lives, our bodily powers, fortunes, and sacred honors!”
According to the above combination the church was driven from , and , then acting as Lieutenant Governor, and living in this said , sanctioned this first regular mob edict, that ever disgraced the asylum of liberty: kept himself in with both parties, and performed a solemn nothing. After the trial of , for driving us off and taking away our arms, he gave an order for our arms to be returned, but never enforced it, and we never got them. Our losses, for lands, wheat fields, about two hundred houses burnt to the ground, cattle, farming utensils, and plunder of all descriptions, could not be less than one hundred thousand dollars! which have never been remumerated! Our armistice from the persecution and tribulation, was performed in the surrounding counties, but mainly in , where, to a certain extent, we shared and reciprocated hospitality enough to live, till another exitement caused another move. The arguments used against us this time, were as follows:—
“It is apparent to every reflecting mind, that a crisis has arrived in this , that requires the deep, cool, dispassionate consideration, and immediate action of every lover of peace, harmony and good order. We cannot conceal from ourselves the fact, that at this moment the clouds of civil war are rolling up their fearful [p. 920]
that they may be put in the archives of my Holy Temple, to be held in remembrance from generation to generation, saith the Lord of Hosts.
I will say to all the saints, that I desired with exceeding great desire, to have addressed them from the stand, on the subject of baptism for the dead, on the following sabbath. But inasmuch as it is out my power to do so, I will write the word of the Lord from time to time, on that subject, and send it you by mail, as well as many others things.
I now close my letter for the present, for the want of more time: for the enemy is on the alert, and as the Savior said, the prince of this world cometh, but he hath nothing in me.
Behold my prayer to God is, that you all may be saved. And I subscribe myself your servant in the Lord, prophet and seer of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints.
JOSEPH SMITH.
 
————
MOB LAW.
In order to give the community a fair understanding of the treatment which the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, has received from the government where it has been located, we shall revert to scenes gone by, and documents already published:—And in the first place, in union with the Declaration of Independence, “we hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable rights; that among these are life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness;” and that the constitution of the and of the several states, save Louisiana, have ample provisions made for the enjoyment of religious liberty.
It can not have been forgotten so soon, that oppression, and a want of the liberty of conscience, were among the first agrievances that caused our government to usher into existence; nor should it be less a matter of surprise, that the sons of the fathers of our freedom, should have become so soon tainted with that tyranny, cruelty, oppression, and inhumanity which has overwhelmed and ruined kingdom after kingdom, and nation after nation—but so it is—and in 1838, without cause, the inhabitants of , Missouri, signed the first specimen of mob law, from which we make the following extracts:—
“We, the undersigned. citizens of , believing that an important crisis is at hand, as regards our civil society, in consequence of a pretended religious sect of people, that have settled and are still settling in our , styling themselves Mormons: and intending as we do to rid our society, peaceably if we can, forcibly if we mnst: and believing as we do, that the arm of the civil law does not afford us a guarantee, or at least a sufficient one, against the evils which are now inflicted upon us, and seem to be increasing by the said religious sect; deem it expedient and of the highest importance, to form ourselves into a company for the better and easier accomplishment of our purpose; a purpose which we deem it almost superfluous to say, is justified as well by the law of nature as by the law of self-preservation.”
“They openly blasheme the most High God and cast contempt upon His Holy Religion, by pretending to receive Revelations direct from Heaven—by pretending to speak in unknown tongues by direct inspiration.”
“We therefore agree, that after timely warning, and upon receiving an adequate compensation for what little property they cannot take with them, they refuse to leave us in peace as they found us, we agree to use such means as may be sufficient to remove them. And to that end, we severally pledge to each other, our lives, our bodily powers, fortunes, and sacred honors!”
According to the above combination the church was driven from , and , then acting as Lieutenant Governor, and living in this said , sanctioned this first regular mob edict, that ever disgraced the asylum of liberty: kept himself in with both parties, and performed a solemn nothing. After the trial of , for driving us off and taking away our arms, he gave an order for our arms to be returned, but never enforced it, and we never got them. Our losses, for lands, wheat fields, about two hundred houses burnt to the ground, cattle, farming utensils, and plunder of all descriptions, could not be less than one hundred thousand dollars! which have never been remumerated! Our armistice from the persecution and tribulation, was performed in the surrounding counties, but mainly in , where, to a certain extent, we shared and reciprocated hospitality enough to live, till another exitement caused another move. The arguments used against us this time, were as follows:—
“It is apparent to every reflecting mind, that a crisis has arrived in this , that requires the deep, cool, dispassionate consideration, and immediate action of every lover of peace, harmony and good order. We cannot conceal from ourselves the fact, that at this moment the clouds of civil war are rolling up their fearful [p. 920]
Page 920