Times and Seasons, 2 May 1842

  • Source Note
Page 775
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We believe that is neither a prophet, nor the son of a prophet, or he would have known that wherever, or whenever God had a prophet, and he spoke the word of the Lord, or “got a revelation that has ended the matter”—we perceive that he has a notion of feeling a little funny at our expense, but notwithstanding those peculiar freaks and little witticisms of , we must say that he acts with more candor and honesty, and is more of a gentleman and philanthrophist than most of the editors of the present day; he publishes our own statements to the world in their native simplicity, unguarnished, without misrepresentation, coloring or fiction, and leaves it as all honest men will do, for a discerning public to judge of the correctness, or incorrectness of the principles thus laid before them. The very pious and holy editors of the “Baptist Advocate;”—The “New York Evangelist;” and the “Christain Advocate and Journal,” and many other of the holy order that we might mention, would do well to pattern after the moral honesty and righteousness of . We say this because we have generally found that those gentlemen of the black cloth are more ready to listen to reports, misrepresentation and falsehood than to matters of fact, and that if they are not at all times the authors of the foul calumnies that so frequently disgrace their pages; yet their columns are always open for slander, and falsehood, whenever it suits their purpose.
The would be great Mr. O. Bachelor of or elsewhere, has lately published a long tirade about Morminism in the “Baptist Advocate;” without refering to his production we would merely state that he would have done well to have published at the same time an account of his ungentlemanly proceeding at a discussion with Elder ; when one of his brother infidels who was chairman told him that he would not acknowledge so dishonorable a man as one of their fraternity—of a subsequent defeat by Elder Adams of , (soon after he had joined the church) and of his late dicomfiture by a boy in . Surely so mighty a champion as Mr. Bachelor, aided with such powerful truths, (alias falsehoods,) as those published in the Baptist Advocate, ought to have been able to have vanquished those puereil [puerile] defendents of Mormonism, and swept so awful a delusion into everlasting oblivion: or is it the case that he is more powerful in writing than oratory? or has the pious editor of the “Baptist Advocate” assisted him to compile his foul slander? Ed.
 
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TIMES AND SEASONS.
CITY OF ,
MONDAY, MAY 2, 1842.
——————————
 
THE .
This noble edifice is progressing with great rapidity; strenuous exertions are being made on every hand to facilitate its erection, and materials of all kinds are in a great state of forwardness, and by next fall we expect to see the building enclosed; if not the top stone raised with “shouting of grace—grace, unto it.” There have been frequently, during the winter, as many as one hundred hands quarrying rock, while at the same time multitudes of others have been engaged in hauling, and in other kinds of labor. A company was formed last fall to go up to the to purchase mills, and prepare and saw lumber for the , and the , and the reports from them are very favorable; another company has started this last week, to take their place, and to relieve those that are already there; on their return they are to bring a very large raft of lumber for the use of the above named houses.
While the busy multitudes have thus been engaged in their several avocations performing their daily labor, and working one tenth of their time, others have not been less forward in bringing in their tithings, and consecrations for the same great object. Never since the formation of this church was laid, have we seen manifested a greater willingness to comply with the requisitions of Jehovah; a more ardent desire to do the will of God; more strenuous exertions used; or greater sacrifices made, than there has been since the Lord said, “Let the Temple be built by [t]he tithing of my people.” It seemed as though the spirit of enterprise, philanthropy, and obedience rested simultaneously upon old and young; and brethren and sisters, boys and girls, and even strangers, who were not in the church, united with an unprecedented liberality in the accomplishment of this great work; nor could the widow, in many instances, be prevented, out of her scanty pittance, from throwing in her two mites.
We feel at this time to tender to all, old and young, both in the church and out of it, our unfeigned thanks for their unprecedented liberality, kindness, dilligence, and obedience which they have so opportunely manifested on the present occasion. Not that we are personally or individually benefitted in a pecuniary point of view, but when the brethren as in this in [p. 775]
We believe that is neither a prophet, nor the son of a prophet, or he would have known that wherever, or whenever God had a prophet, and he spoke the word of the Lord, or “got a revelation that has ended the matter”—we perceive that he has a notion of feeling a little funny at our expense, but notwithstanding those peculiar freaks and little witticisms of , we must say that he acts with more candor and honesty, and is more of a gentleman and philanthrophist than most of the editors of the present day; he publishes our own statements to the world in their native simplicity, unguarnished, without misrepresentation, coloring or fiction, and leaves it as all honest men will do, for a discerning public to judge of the correctness, or incorrectness of the principles thus laid before them. The very pious and holy editors of the “Baptist Advocate;”—The “New York Evangelist;” and the “Christain Advocate and Journal,” and many other of the holy order that we might mention, would do well to pattern after the moral honesty and righteousness of . We say this because we have generally found that those gentlemen of the black cloth are more ready to listen to reports, misrepresentation and falsehood than to matters of fact, and that if they are not at all times the authors of the foul calumnies that so frequently disgrace their pages; yet their columns are always open for slander, and falsehood, whenever it suits their purpose.
The would be great Mr. O. Bachelor of or elsewhere, has lately published a long tirade about Morminism in the “Baptist Advocate;” without refering to his production we would merely state that he would have done well to have published at the same time an account of his ungentlemanly proceeding at a discussion with Elder ; when one of his brother infidels who was chairman told him that he would not acknowledge so dishonorable a man as one of their fraternity—of a subsequent defeat by Elder Adams of , (soon after he had joined the church) and of his late dicomfiture by a boy in . Surely so mighty a champion as Mr. Bachelor, aided with such powerful truths, (alias falsehoods,) as those published in the Baptist Advocate, ought to have been able to have vanquished those puereil [puerile] defendents of Mormonism, and swept so awful a delusion into everlasting oblivion: or is it the case that he is more powerful in writing than oratory? or has the pious editor of the “Baptist Advocate” assisted him to compile his foul slander? Ed.
 
——————————
TIMES AND SEASONS.
CITY OF ,
MONDAY, MAY 2, 1842.
——————————
 
THE .
This noble edifice is progressing with great rapidity; strenuous exertions are being made on every hand to facilitate its erection, and materials of all kinds are in a great state of forwardness, and by next fall we expect to see the building enclosed; if not the top stone raised with “shouting of grace—grace, unto it.” There have been frequently, during the winter, as many as one hundred hands quarrying rock, while at the same time multitudes of others have been engaged in hauling, and in other kinds of labor. A company was formed last fall to go up to the to purchase mills, and prepare and saw lumber for the , and the , and the reports from them are very favorable; another company has started this last week, to take their place, and to relieve those that are already there; on their return they are to bring a very large raft of lumber for the use of the above named houses.
While the busy multitudes have thus been engaged in their several avocations performing their daily labor, and working one tenth of their time, others have not been less forward in bringing in their tithings, and consecrations for the same great object. Never since the formation of this church was laid, have we seen manifested a greater willingness to comply with the requisitions of Jehovah; a more ardent desire to do the will of God; more strenuous exertions used; or greater sacrifices made, than there has been since the Lord said, “Let the Temple be built by [t]he tithing of my people.” It seemed as though the spirit of enterprise, philanthropy, and obedience rested simultaneously upon old and young; and brethren and sisters, boys and girls, and even strangers, who were not in the church, united with an unprecedented liberality in the accomplishment of this great work; nor could the widow, in many instances, be prevented, out of her scanty pittance, from throwing in her two mites.
We feel at this time to tender to all, old and young, both in the church and out of it, our unfeigned thanks for their unprecedented liberality, kindness, dilligence, and obedience which they have so opportunely manifested on the present occasion. Not that we are personally or individually benefitted in a pecuniary point of view, but when the brethren as in this in [p. 775]
Page 775