Introduction to State of Illinois v. Rolfe

Document Transcript

State of Illinois v. Rolfe
Nauvoo, Hancock Co., Illinois, Mayor’s Court, 27 March 1844
Nauvoo, Hancock Co., Illinois, Justice of the Peace Court, 28 March 1844
 
Historical Introduction
On 27 March 1844, JS issued a warrant for “for stealing 2 stone cutters tools. on complaint Vernon H. Bruce.” Ianthis was the teenage son of and Elizabeth Rolfe. Samuel worked as a carpenter on the , Illinois, , as did Vernon Bruce.
The following day, the case was heard before , a , Illinois, justice of the peace who lived in . It is unknown why the case was transferred to Johnson. After an investigation, Johnson discharged “for want of evidence.”
 
Calendar of Documents
This calendar lists all known documents created by or for the court, whether extant or not. It does not include versions of documents created for other purposes, though those versions may be listed in footnotes. In certain cases, especially in cases concerning unpaid debts, the originating document (promissory note, invoice, etc.) is listed here. Note that documents in the calendar are grouped with their originating court. Where a version of a document was subsequently filed with another court, that version is listed under both courts.

Footnotes

  1. 1

    JS, Journal, 27 Mar. 1844.  

  2. 2

    Clayton, History of the Nauvoo Temple, 98–99.  

    Clayton, William. History of the Nauvoo Temple, ca. 1845. CHL. MS 3365.

  3. 3

    JS, Journal, 28 Mar. 1844. Illinois law allowed defendants the privilege, upon oath, to transfer a case if “it is the belief of such deponent that the defendant cannot have an impartial trial before such justice.” Upon receipt of the oath, the justice was required to submit all papers and documents affiliated with the suit “to the nearest justice of peace.” (An Act concerning Justices of the Peace and Constables [12 Feb. 1827], Public and General Statute Laws of the State of Illinois [1839], p. 408, sec. 25.)  

    The Public and General Statute Laws of the State of Illinois: Containing All the Laws . . . Passed by the Ninth General Assembly, at Their First Session, Commencing December 1, 1834, and Ending February 13, 1835; and at Their Second Session, Commencing December 7, 1835, and Ending January 18, 1836; and Those Passed by the Tenth General Assembly, at Their Session Commencing December 5, 1836, and Ending March 6, 1837; and at Their Special Session, Commencing July 10, and Ending July 22, 1837. . . . Compiled by Jonathan Young Scammon. Chicago: Stephen F. Gale, 1839.

  4. 4

    Docket Entry, ca. 28 Mar. 1844 [State of Illinois v. Rolfe]; Illinois law defined larceny as “the felonious stealing” of “the personal goods of another.” Conviction would result in imprisonment in the penitentiary from one to ten years. (An Act relative to Criminal Jurisprudence [26 Feb. 1833], Public and General Statute Laws of the State of Illinois [1839], p. 208, sec. 62.)  

    The Public and General Statute Laws of the State of Illinois: Containing All the Laws . . . Passed by the Ninth General Assembly, at Their First Session, Commencing December 1, 1834, and Ending February 13, 1835; and at Their Second Session, Commencing December 7, 1835, and Ending January 18, 1836; and Those Passed by the Tenth General Assembly, at Their Session Commencing December 5, 1836, and Ending March 6, 1837; and at Their Special Session, Commencing July 10, and Ending July 22, 1837. . . . Compiled by Jonathan Young Scammon. Chicago: Stephen F. Gale, 1839.