Invoice, John A. Newbould to Cahoon, Carter & Co., 17 June 1836

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction

Document Transcript

, June 17th 1836
Messrs.
Bought of ,
IMPORTER and Wholesale Dealer in all descriptions of Foreign and Domestic Hardware, Cutlery, Iron, Steel, Nails, &c.
189 MAIN-STREET, 3 doors below the Farmer’s Hotel.
6 doz[en] knvs [knives] & f[or]ks Ea 5/6 7/— 8/— 10/— 9/— 10/— 10/— 44.62
1 [doz] cook knives 28/— 3.50
1 [doz] single pocket knives Ea 14/— 15/— 3.02
11/ 12 [doz] 2 Bld [pocket knives] 68/— 7.79
2/3 [doz 2 Bld pocket knives] 68/— 5.67
Twenty four fly open dirk knvs 20/— 60.00
Eighteen 2 bld [dirk knvs] 13/— 29.25
Twelve fine [dirk knvs] 13/— 19.50
Twelve [fine dirk knvs] 14/— 25.00
Twelve [fine dirk knvs] 18/— 27.00
Twelve [fine dirk knvs] 14/— 25.00
1/2 doz rulers Ea 48/— 68/— 7.25
6 pr [pairs] carvers Ea 3/— 5/— 6/— 10.50
3 [pr carvers] 7/— 2.62
2 doz plated table spoons 14/— 3.50
12 bunches beads 1/— 1.50
1 doz wood combs 5/6 0.69
1 [doz] steel flint boxes 24/— 3.00
1 [doz] plated tea bells No. 0 14/— 1.75
1 [doz] razor cases Ea 28/— 56/— 10.50
<​Too much​> 1⅔ [doz] combs <​Too much​> 16/— 3.33
2 [doz] fancy soap 6/— 1.50
1/2 [doz] ink powder 7/— 0.42
2 [doz] spectacles 12/— 3.00
1/2 [doz] waiters 14/— 0.87
4 Braces wh 18 bitts 18/— 9.00
1 doz pocket books 20/— 2.50
1 [doz] wallets 4/— 0.50
Ea 5/— 6/— 7/— 6.75
2 [dinner bells] 9/— 2.25
1 doz norfolk latches Ea 6/— 9/— 1.87
1 [doz] amkn. [norfolk latches] 34/— 4.25
320.50
[p. [1]]
Amount bro[ugh]t. forward 320.50
1 doz[en] bright thumb latches 4 9/— 1.12
1/2 [doz] long laq[uere]d. [latches] 44/— 2.75
1/2 [doz] powder flasks Ea 18/— 20/— 2.37
1/2 [doz] slates 12/— 0.75
3 lbs shoe thread ea 5/— 6/— 8/— 7.12
1 gross screws Ea 1¼ $0.17, 2⅝ $0.18, 3½ $0.18, 5½ $0.19, 7½ $0.23, 5⅝ $0.22 1.17
1 [gross screws] Ea 9⅝ $0.31, 6¾ $0.26, 9¾ $0.32, 10 1. $0.36, 12 1 $0.40, 10 1¼ $0.40, 14 1¼ $0.56, 15 1½ $0.75, 16 2 $1.00 4.36
3 doz butts Ea 1¼ $0.15, 2¾ $0.48, 3½ $0.85 4.44
6 [doz butts] 21/ 4 $0.32 1.92
2 [doz butts] 4 $1.06 2.12
1 [doz] best plane irons 28/— 30/— 36/— 11.75
1/2 [doz] d[ou]ble [plane irons] 2⅛ 2¼ 2⅜ 2½ 2⅝ 42/— 44/— 52/— 54/— 56/— 15.50
1 [doz] wool cards 15/— 1.87
1/4 [doz] bellows 42/— 1.31
1/2 [doz] steelyards 44/— 2.75
1 [doz] bright turn screws Ea 12/— 22/— 4.25
11/12 [doz bright] round bolts 20/— 2.29
2/3 [doz bright round bolts] 22/— 1.83
1 [doz] spokeshaves 28/— 3.50
1/4 [doz spokeshaves] extra good 48/— 1.50
1 [doz] snuffer trays 18/— 2.25
1 [doz] snuffers Ea 8/— 16/— 26/— 42/— 11.50
5/12 [doz snuffers] 26/— 1.36
1/3 [doz snuffers] 30/— 1.25
7/12 [doz snuffers] 14/— 1.02
1/6 [doz] sad iron stands 12/— 0.25
2 [doz] chalk lines 6/— 1.50
1 [doz chalk lines] 4/— 0.50
10 c fish hooks 2/6 3.13
5 [c] darning needles 1/6 0.94
1 gross knitting pins 3/6 0.44
1 m needles 6/— 0.75
4 doz 2 in glass knobs 8/— 4.00
1 gross best awl blades 20/— 2.50
1 doz pocket compasses 34/— 4.25
1 [doz pocket] inkstands 10/— 1.25
1 p[ai]r try sad irons 2/ 6 1.25
433.31
[p. [2]]
Amount bro[ugh]t forw[ar]d. 433.31
12 m 3/4 in brads 104 1.20
24 [m] sparables 1/2 6 1.44
20 [m sparables] 5/8 7 1.40
1 gross awl hafts 18/— 2.25
1/2 doz mouse traps 15/— 0.94
1/2 [doz] rat [traps] 28/— 1.75
2 sheet iron tea kettles 12/— 3.00
25 lbs borax 28/ 7.00
17 Augurs (85 qrs) 1/— 10.62
2 fl sad irons 24 lbs 74 1.68
1 doz seives 32/— 4.00
Cask 8/— Box 1/6 Ctge [Cartage] 1/6 1.38
$469.97
Rec[eive]d a note for annexed bill at six months
[14 lines blank]
<​One cask & one box inside the cask—​> [p. [3]]
Check
Bill of Hard Ware Am[oun]t $469.97 [p. [4]]

Footnotes

  1. new scribe logo

    Printed text ends; John A. Newbould handwriting resumes.  

  2. 1

    “A kind of dagger or poniard.” (“Dirk,” in American Dictionary [1828].)  

    An American Dictionary of the English Language: Intended to Exhibit, I. the Origin, Affinities and Primary Signification of English Words, as far as They Have Been Ascertained. . . . Edited by Noah Webster. New York: S. Converse, 1828.

  3. new scribe logo

    Endorsement in handwriting of Oliver Cowdery.  

  4. new scribe logo

    Endorsement in handwriting of Oliver Cowdery.  

  5. 2

    “A vessel on which tea furniture, etc. is carried.” (“Waiter,” in American Dictionary [1828].)  

    An American Dictionary of the English Language: Intended to Exhibit, I. the Origin, Affinities and Primary Signification of English Words, as far as They Have Been Ascertained. . . . Edited by Noah Webster. New York: S. Converse, 1828.

  6. 3

    A carpentry tool with a crank handle and a socket to hold the bit; used for boring. (“Brace,” in Oxford English Dictionary, 1:1041.)  

    The Oxford English Dictionary. Edited by James A. H. Murray, Henry Bradley, W. A. Craigie, and C. T. Onions. 12 vols. 1933. Reprint, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1970.

  7. 4

    A knapsack or bag for carrying necessities for travel. (“Wallet,” in American Dictionary [1828].)  

    An American Dictionary of the English Language: Intended to Exhibit, I. the Origin, Affinities and Primary Signification of English Words, as far as They Have Been Ascertained. . . . Edited by Noah Webster. New York: S. Converse, 1828.

  8. 5

    A thumb latch, popular from about 1800 to 1840, that was fairly inexpensive and used standardized parts. The Norfolk latch consisted of an ornamented sheet-iron plate that was screwed into a door and an attached iron grip or handle. The handle’s midpoint had a ribbed or patterned swelling in its midsection. A thumbpiece with a lever was placed above the grip. (Garvin, Building History of Northern New England, 82–83.)  

    Garvin, James L. A Building History of Northern New England. Lebanon, NH: University Press of New England, 2001.

  9. 6

    Possibly refers to a butt hinge, available in the New England area as early as 1800. Commonly used today, the hinge swivels on a knuckle or joint and is installed in the edge of a door or shutter. (“Butt,” in American Dictionary [1828]; Garvin, Building History of Northern New England, 81.)  

    An American Dictionary of the English Language: Intended to Exhibit, I. the Origin, Affinities and Primary Signification of English Words, as far as They Have Been Ascertained. . . . Edited by Noah Webster. New York: S. Converse, 1828.

    Garvin, James L. A Building History of Northern New England. Lebanon, NH: University Press of New England, 2001.

  10. 7

    Blades used in woodworking planes. (“Plane,” in Oxford English Dictionary, 7:943.)  

    The Oxford English Dictionary. Edited by James A. H. Murray, Henry Bradley, W. A. Craigie, and C. T. Onions. 12 vols. 1933. Reprint, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1970.

  11. 8

    An instrument with round handles at the end of a stock and a wedge-shaped iron with two turned-up tangs driven into holes in the stock. Originally a specialized tool for a wheelwright, it became a generalized tool for other craftsmen. Metal spokeshaves were popular in the United States in the mid-1800s. (Goodman, History of Woodworking Tools, 203.)  

    Goodman, William Louis. The History of Woodworking Tools. London: G. Bell and Sons, 1964.

  12. 9

    “An instrument for cropping the snuff of a candle.” (“Snuffers,” in American Dictionary [1828].)  

    An American Dictionary of the English Language: Intended to Exhibit, I. the Origin, Affinities and Primary Signification of English Words, as far as They Have Been Ascertained. . . . Edited by Noah Webster. New York: S. Converse, 1828.

  13. 10

    “A smoothing iron, properly a solid flat-iron, in contradistinction to a box-iron.” The adjective “sad” comes from Old English, meaning dense, compact, or heavy. (“Sad-iron,” in Oxford English Dictionary, 9:25.)”  

    The Oxford English Dictionary. Edited by James A. H. Murray, Henry Bradley, W. A. Craigie, and C. T. Onions. 12 vols. 1933. Reprint, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1970.

  14. 11

    A nail that lacks a shoulder over the shank or a broad head and is driven entirely into the wood; used in floors. (“Brad,” in American Dictionary [1828]; “Brad,” in Oxford English Dictionary, 1:1045.)  

    An American Dictionary of the English Language: Intended to Exhibit, I. the Origin, Affinities and Primary Signification of English Words, as far as They Have Been Ascertained. . . . Edited by Noah Webster. New York: S. Converse, 1828.

    The Oxford English Dictionary. Edited by James A. H. Murray, Henry Bradley, W. A. Craigie, and C. T. Onions. 12 vols. 1933. Reprint, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1970.

  15. 12

    Term for a small nail. A sparable also referred to a headless wedge-shaped nail used in the soles and heels of shoes. (“Sparable,” in American Dictionary [1828]; “Sparable,” in Oxford English Dictionary, 10:512.6 q.)  

    An American Dictionary of the English Language: Intended to Exhibit, I. the Origin, Affinities and Primary Signification of English Words, as far as They Have Been Ascertained. . . . Edited by Noah Webster. New York: S. Converse, 1828.

    The Oxford English Dictionary. Edited by James A. H. Murray, Henry Bradley, W. A. Craigie, and C. T. Onions. 12 vols. 1933. Reprint, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1970.

  16. 13

    “A smoothing iron, properly a solid flat-iron, in contradistinction to a box-iron.” The adjective “sad” comes from Old English, meaning dense, compact, or heavy.” (“Sad-iron,” in Oxford English Dictionary, 9:25.)  

    The Oxford English Dictionary. Edited by James A. H. Murray, Henry Bradley, W. A. Craigie, and C. T. Onions. 12 vols. 1933. Reprint, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1970.

  17. 14

    “A close vessel for containing liquors, formed by staves, heading and hoops. This is a general term comprehending the pipe, hogshead, butt, barrel, etc.” (“Cask,” in American Dictionary [1828].)  

    An American Dictionary of the English Language: Intended to Exhibit, I. the Origin, Affinities and Primary Signification of English Words, as far as They Have Been Ascertained. . . . Edited by Noah Webster. New York: S. Converse, 1828.

  18. 15

    The cost associated with transporting goods, which were originally transported by cart. (“Cartage,” in American Dictionary [1828].)  

    An American Dictionary of the English Language: Intended to Exhibit, I. the Origin, Affinities and Primary Signification of English Words, as far as They Have Been Ascertained. . . . Edited by Noah Webster. New York: S. Converse, 1828.

  19. 16

    “A close vessel for containing liquors, formed by staves, heading and hoops. This is a general term comprehending the pipe, hogshead, butt, barrel, etc.” (“Cask,” in American Dictionary [1828].)  

    An American Dictionary of the English Language: Intended to Exhibit, I. the Origin, Affinities and Primary Signification of English Words, as far as They Have Been Ascertained. . . . Edited by Noah Webster. New York: S. Converse, 1828.

  20. new scribe logo

    Docket in unidentified handwriting.