“A History, of the Persecution, of the Church of Jesus Christ, of Latter Day Saints in Missouri,” December 1839–October 1840

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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survived. During this time they lived on the best that the neighborhood could afford, plundering and stealing all the palatable food which had by the industry and prudence of murdered husbands, been laid in store for themselves and families.
They burned all the books that they could find, they shot the hogs and cattle, it seemed for pleasure of shooting game, as they did not consume near all they killed.
One day with a number of men went to , who was at the time laying confined with wounds received in the massacre. They came to question , to ascertain where certain of his neighbors were who had escaped the murdering party. told them he did not know. I then got up, left the room, but was followed by some of the company, who commanded me not to leave until the could see me. The was accordingly called upon and came out to see me; he very gravely and sternly charged me to be gone or on the act of starting on Tuesday evening, this being on Sunday evening. He said I must obey at my peril, or renounce Mormonism. I asked him what I must deny; he said deny that Jo. Smith is a Prophet. As for moving I told him I thought it quite a short notice to get ready to leave the , and the weather being so cold, and robbed of all our clothing, &c.— I also told him that my wife was quite sick and not able to move so soon, and furthermore the roads are guarded or said to be, so that no Mormon could pass either way without being mobbed. I asked him if I must be driven off by one company, and and another lay in wait to murder me as I go. I told him I thought the condition of the treaty was that we could stay until spring: he replied that was the first conclusion, but he had just received new orders from the General, and that was, that all Mormons should be driven out of the state forthwith. I then asked him if the way was not guarded so that I would be in no danger in passing the roads. He said he would give me a pass or ticket which would carry me safely through the , provided I continued to travel in an eastward course and minded my own business. We soon parted, and on the next day I went to the mill and received my pass which reads as follows. Having the original in my possession I give it verbatim.
 
November 13th, 1838.
This is to certify that , a Mormon, is permitted to leave and pass through the State of in an eastward direction unmolested during good behaviour.
,
Capt. Militia.
 
The next day Hiram Comstock, the ’s brother, with two or three others, brought a prisoner to me to see, if I knew him; I told them I had seen him, but did not know his name. After questioning me for sometime, they told me to go with them into their camp, and said I might consider myself a prisoner. They kept me until the next day, and set me at liberty charging me to be gone from the forthwith. I was compelled to comply with these orders at the sacrifice of all I had, and leave the state of agreeably to the order of the of that , a thing unprecedented in the history of the world. I was taught to hold sacred the rights of man in my childhood. I was raised in Kentucky, born in 1814, and lived in that until April, 1837. Such doctrine as taught and practised in , by the officers of that was never taught, neither practiced in my native state.
. [p. 150]
survived. During this time they lived on the best that the neighborhood could afford, plundering and stealing all the palatable food which had by the industry and prudence of murdered husbands, been laid in store for themselves and families.
They burned all the books that they could find, they shot the hogs and cattle, it seemed for pleasure of shooting game, as they did not consume near all they killed.
One day with a number of men went to , who was at the time laying confined with wounds received in the massacre. They came to question , to ascertain where certain of his neighbors were who had escaped the murdering party. told them he did not know. I then got up, left the room, but was followed by some of the company, who commanded me not to leave until the could see me. The was accordingly called upon and came out to see me; he very gravely and sternly charged me to be gone or on the act of starting on Tuesday evening, this being on Sunday evening. He said I must obey at my peril, or renounce Mormonism. I asked him what I must deny; he said deny that Jo. Smith is a Prophet. As for moving I told him I thought it quite a short notice to get ready to leave the , and the weather being so cold, and robbed of all our clothing, &c.— I also told him that my wife was quite sick and not able to move so soon, and furthermore the roads are guarded or said to be, so that no Mormon could pass either way without being mobbed. I asked him if I must be driven off by one company, and and another lay in wait to murder me as I go. I told him I thought the condition of the treaty was that we could stay until spring: he replied that was the first conclusion, but he had just received new orders from the General, and that was, that all Mormons should be driven out of the state forthwith. I then asked him if the way was not guarded so that I would be in no danger in passing the roads. He said he would give me a pass or ticket which would carry me safely through the , provided I continued to travel in an eastward course and minded my own business. We soon parted, and on the next day I went to the mill and received my pass which reads as follows. Having the original in my possession I give it verbatim.
 
November 13th, 1838.
This is to certify that , a Mormon, is permitted to leave and pass through the State of in an eastward direction unmolested during good behaviour.
,
Capt. Militia.
 
The next day Hiram Comstock, the ’s brother, with two or three others, brought a prisoner to me to see, if I knew him; I told them I had seen him, but did not know his name. After questioning me for sometime, they told me to go with them into their camp, and said I might consider myself a prisoner. They kept me until the next day, and set me at liberty charging me to be gone from the forthwith. I was compelled to comply with these orders at the sacrifice of all I had, and leave the state of agreeably to the order of the of that , a thing unprecedented in the history of the world. I was taught to hold sacred the rights of man in my childhood. I was raised in Kentucky, born in 1814, and lived in that until April, 1837. Such doctrine as taught and practised in , by the officers of that was never taught, neither practiced in my native state.
. [p. 150]
Page 150