Council of Fifty, Minutes, March 1844–January 1846; Volume 1, 10 March 1844–1 March 1845

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page [243]
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13 May 1844 • Monday

Editorial Note
On 4 April 1844 the council assigned to carry to the Congress a petition that JS be made a member of the army and be allowed to raise one hundred thousand volunteers to protect national interests in the western borderlands. Hyde reported his progress in letters written back to on 25 and 26 April. Upon receiving Hyde’s letters on 13 May, the council met “immediately” to review them. JS’s journal entry for that day notes: “at 9. A M. called a meeting of the Kin[g]dom.” Many council members had already departed Nauvoo to campaign for JS’s presidency. However, twenty-seven members—enough to form a quorum and conduct business—assembled for a council meeting, which met from 2:00 to 4:30 p.m. JS and other council members expressed dismay that Hyde, acting on advice from members of the congressional delegation, had stricken the provision in the proposed legislation naming JS a member of the U.S. Army. The council approved a resolution that representatives of the council in “carry all Memorials through Congress without alteration.” and were appointed to carry a letter to this effect to Hyde and in Washington. The council also appointed , , and to prepare a state nominating convention in Illinois for JS’s presidential campaign. The council’s clerk, , remained away on business. , the council’s recorder, likely kept the minutes. When Clayton copied the minutes into the “Record,” he appended a copy of the letter to Hyde and Pratt following the 13 May entry.

Monday May 13th. 1844 2 o clock P.M. Meeting called by the Chairman
2 Letters from E[lde]r dated at April 25th. & 26th. 1844 were read. In the letters he stated that he had agreed to leave the clause appointing president “Joseph Smith a member of the army[”] stricken out in order to get the document through. <​(See after minutes of May 31st. 1844)​>
did not know what course to pursue.
wanted our delegation at instructed to press our memorial though Congress as fast as possible without any alteration, and we would continue our petitions [p. [243]]
13 May 1844 • Monday

Editorial Note
On 4 April 1844 the council assigned to carry to the Congress a petition that JS be made a member of the army and be allowed to raise one hundred thousand volunteers to protect national interests in the western borderlands. Hyde reported his progress in letters written back to on 25 and 26 April. Upon receiving Hyde’s letters on 13 May, the council met “immediately” to review them. JS’s journal entry for that day notes: “at 9. A M. called a meeting of the Kin[g]dom.” Many council members had already departed Nauvoo to campaign for JS’s presidency. However, twenty-seven members—enough to form a quorum and conduct business—assembled for a council meeting, which met from 2:00 to 4:30 p.m. JS and other council members expressed dismay that Hyde, acting on advice from members of the congressional delegation, had stricken the provision in the proposed legislation naming JS a member of the U.S. Army. The council approved a resolution that representatives of the council in “carry all Memorials through Congress without alteration.” and were appointed to carry a letter to this effect to Hyde and in Washington. The council also appointed , , and to prepare a state nominating convention in Illinois for JS’s presidential campaign. The council’s clerk, , remained away on business. , the council’s recorder, likely kept the minutes. When Clayton copied the minutes into the “Record,” he appended a copy of the letter to Hyde and Pratt following the 13 May entry.

Monday May 13th. 1844 2 o clock P.M. Meeting called by the Chairman
2 Letters from Elder dated at April 25th. & 26th. 1844 were read. In the letters he stated that he had agreed to leave the clause appointing president “Joseph Smith a member of the army” stricken out in order to get the document through. (See after minutes of May 31st. 1844)
did not know what course to pursue.
wanted our delegation at instructed to press our memorial though Congress as fast as possible without any alteration, and we would continue our petitions [p. [243]]
Page [243]