Docket Entry, 1–circa 6 July 1843 [Extradition of JS for Treason]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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to see us, but were forbidden to speak to us & they immediately drove off for We travelled about twelve miles that evening & encamped for the night. The same strong guard was kept around us & were relieved every two hours, & we were permitted to sleep on the ground, the nights were then cold, with considerable snow on the ground & for the want of covering & clothing, we suffered extremely with the cold. That night was a commencement of a fit of sickness from which I have not wholly recovered unto this day, in consequence of my exposure to the inclemency of the weather. Our provision was fresh beef roasted in the fire on a stick; the army having no bread in consequence of the want of Mills to grind the grain. In the morning at the dawn of day, we were forced on our journey, & were exhibited to the inhabitants along the road; the same as they exhibit a carravan of elephants or camels. We were examined from head to foot, by men, women & children, only I believe they did not make us open our mouths to look at our teeth. This treatment was continued incessantly until we arrived at in . After our arrival at , we were driven all through the for inspection & then we were ordered into an old log house & there kept under guard as usual, until supper, which was served up to us as we sat upon the floor; or on billets of Wood, & we were compelled to stay in that house all that night & the next day. They continued to exhibit us to the public, by letting the people come in & examine us & then go away & give place for others, alternately all that day & the next night, but on the morning of the following day we were all permitted to go to the tavern to eat & to sleep, but afterward the<​y​> made us pay our own expences, for board, lodging & attendance, & for which they made a most exorbitant charge. We remained in the tavern about two days & two nights when an officer arrived with authority from to take us back to , Ray county, where the had arrived with his army, to await our arrival there: but on the morning of our start for we were informed by , that it was expected by the Soldiers that we would be hung by the necks on the road, while on the march to that place & that it was prevented by a demand made for us by who had the command in consequence of Seniority, & that it was his prerogative to execute us himself: and he should give us up into the hands of the officer, who would take us to & he might do with us as he pleased. During our stay at the officers informed us that there were eight or ten horses in that place belonging to the Mormon people, which had been Stolen by the Soldiers & that we might have two of them to ride upon if we would cause them to be sent back to the owners, after our arrival at . We accepted of them & they were rode to & the owners came there & got them. We started in the morning under our new officer of Keytsville, Chariton county, with [p. 71]
to see us, but were forbidden to speak to us & they immediately drove off for We travelled about twelve miles that evening & encamped for the night. The same strong guard was kept around us & were relieved every two hours, & we were permitted to sleep on the ground, the nights were then cold, with considerable snow on the ground & for the want of covering & clothing, we suffered extremely with the cold. That night was a commencement of a fit of sickness from which I have not wholly recovered unto this day, in consequence of my exposure to the inclemency of the weather. Our provision was fresh beef roasted in the fire on a stick; the army having no bread in consequence of the want of Mills to grind the grain. In the morning at the dawn of day, we were forced on our journey, & were exhibited to the inhabitants along the road; the same as they exhibit a carravan of elephants or camels. We were examined from head to foot, by men, women & children, only I believe they did not make us open our mouths to look at our teeth. This treatment was continued incessantly until we arrived at in . After our arrival at , we were driven all through the for inspection & then we were ordered into an old log house & there kept under guard as usual, until supper, which was served up to us as we sat upon the floor; or on billets of Wood, & we were compelled to stay in that house all that night & the next day. They continued to exhibit us to the public, by letting the people come in & examine us & then go away & give place for others, alternately all that day & the next night, but on the morning of the following day we were all permitted to go to the tavern to eat & to sleep, but afterward they made us pay our own expences, for board, lodging & attendance, & for which they made a most exorbitant charge. We remained in the tavern about two days & two nights when an officer arrived with authority from to take us back to , Ray county, where the had arrived with his army, to await our arrival : but on the morning of our start for we were informed by , that it was expected by the Soldiers that we would be hung by the necks on the road, while on the march to that place & that it was prevented by a demand made for us by who had the command in consequence of Seniority, & that it was his prerogative to execute us himself: and he should give us up into the hands of the officer, who would take us to & he might do with us as he pleased. During our stay at the officers informed us that there were eight or ten horses in that place belonging to the Mormon people, which had been Stolen by the Soldiers & that we might have two of them to ride upon if we would cause them to be sent back to the owners, after our arrival at . We accepted of them & they were rode to & the owners came there & got them. We started in the morning under our new officer of Keytsville, Chariton county, with [p. 71]
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