Historian’s Office, Martyrdom Account

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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satisfied that it was <​Joseph told the​> <​this was the​> truth.— but <​still​> he did not interfere in their illegal imprisonment— Joseph adverted to all the leading causes which gave rise to the difficulties under consideration, in a brief but lucid, energetic, and impulsive <​impressive​> manner. The said he was satisfied it was true <​the truth​>. General Smith then read copies of the orders and proceedings of the City Council of , concerning the destruction of the “Expositor Press,” and of the correspondence forwarded to his , in relation to thereto; and also informed him concerning the calling out <​of​> the , and the position they occupied of absolute necessity,— not to make war upon, or invade the rights of any portion of the citizens of the ; but it was the last resort, and only defence, in the absence of executive protection, against a large, organized military and mobocratic foe. General Smith reminded his that the question in dispute was a civil matter, and to settle which needed no resort to arms, and that he was ready at any time, and had always been ready to answer any charge that might be preferred against him, either as the <​Lieutt. General of the Legion, the​> Mayor of the [p. 30]
satisfied that this was the truth.— but still he did not interfere in their illegal imprisonment— Joseph adverted to all the leading causes which gave rise to the difficulties under consideration, in a brief but lucid, energetic, and impressive manner. The said he was satisfied it was the truth. General Smith then read copies of the orders and proceedings of the City Council of , concerning the destruction of the “Expositor Press,” and of the correspondence forwarded to his , in relation thereto; and also informed him concerning the calling out of the , and the position they occupied of absolute necessity,— not to make war upon, or invade the rights of any portion of the citizens of the ; but it was the last resort, and only defence, in the absence of executive protection, against a large, organized military and mobocratic foe. General Smith reminded his that the question in dispute was a civil matter, and to settle which needed no resort to arms, and that he was ready at any time, and had always been ready to answer any charge that might be preferred against him, either as the Lieutt. General of the Legion, the Mayor of the [p. 30]
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