Historian’s Office, Martyrdom Account

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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<​then​> expressed his feelings about the destruction of the <​“Expositor​> press”
Joseph spoke of <​his​> imprisonment in , <​and of the shameful kidnapping of his witnesses and their being thrust into prison to prevent them from giving testimony in my <​his​> favor.​>
spoke of the Constitution
Joseph said we were willing to pay for the press<​, as he did not want them <​the owners​> to suffer any loss by it, neither did he wish such a libelous paper to be published in .​>
<​As for calling out the ​> if it were <​was​> intended to resist the Government of the it would be treason. If people <​but as they​> believed they were endeavoring to defend themselves <​and had no such intention as to resist the government​> it was all right.
10¼ A.M. The left, after saying that the prisoners were under his protection, and again pledged <​pledging​> himself that that they should be protected from violence, and told them <​telling them​> that if the troops marched the next morning to as he then expected, they should <​probably​> be taken along, in order to insure their personal safety, with how much sincerity may be seen by the following affidavits -[insert [Alfred] Randall’s, and J[onathan] C. Wrights affidavits and <​’s.​> <​& [William G.] Sterrett​>]-
While Joseph was writing at his <​the ’s​> desk William Wall stepped up, wanting to deliver a verbal message <​to him​> from his Uncle . He turned round to speak to Wall, but the guard refused to allow them any communication.
At noon Joseph wrote to as folows “” [p. 33]
then expressed his feelings about the destruction of the “Expositor press”
Joseph spoke of his imprisonment in , and of the shameful kidnapping of his witnesses and their being thrust into prison to prevent them from giving testimony in his favor.
spoke of the Constitution
Joseph said we were willing to pay for the press, as he did not want the owners to suffer any loss by it, neither did he wish such a libelous paper to be published in .
As for calling out the if it was intended to resist the Government of the it would be treason. but as they believed they were endeavoring to defend themselves and had no such intention as to resist the government it was all right.
10¼ A.M. The left, after saying that the prisoners were under his protection, and again pledging himself that that they should be protected from violence, and telling them that if the troops marched the next morning to as he then expected, they should probably be taken along, in order to insure their personal safety, with how much sincerity may be seen by the following affidavits -[insert Alfred Randall’s, and Jonathan C. Wrights affidavits and ’s. & William G. Sterrett]-
While Joseph was writing at the ’s desk William Wall stepped up, wanting to deliver a verbal message to him from his Uncle . He turned round to speak to Wall, but the guard refused to allow them any communication.
At noon Joseph wrote to as folows “” [p. 33]
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