History, 1834–1836

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 158
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when folly, and that which militates against truth and righteousness, rears it[s] deformed head.
Therefore in the spirit of my calling, and in view of the authority of the priesthood which has been confered upon me, it was my duty to reprove whatever I considered to be wrong; fondly hoping in my heart, that all parties, would think it right; and therefore humble themselves, that satan might not take the advantage of us, and hinder the progress of our school.— Now I want you should bear with me, notwithstanding my plainness.
I would say to you then, that my feeling[s] were grieved when you interupted in his speech. I thought that you should have considered your relation to him in your Apostleship: And not have manifested any divission of sentiment, between you & him, for the surrounding multitude to take the advantage of.
Therefore by way of entreaty, on account of the anxiety I had for you, & your influence <​& welfare​> in society, I said unto you do not have any feeling, or something to that amount.—
Why I am thus particular, is that if you have misunderstood my feeling<​s​> or motives toward you; you may be corrected. But to proceed.— After the school was commenced closed requested the privilege of speaking; you objected. However you said if he would not abuse the school, he might speak, observing at the same time that you would not allow any man to abuse the School in your house. You had no reason dear brother to suspect that would abuse the School.
Therefore my feelings were mortified, at those unnecessary observations. I undertook to reason with you; but you manifested an inconsiderate and stubborn spirit: I then dispared of benefiting you on the account of the spirit you manifested; which drew from me the expression that you was as ugly as the devil.
then commanded silence and I formed the de[te]rmination to obey his mandate, and was about to leave the house, with the impression that you was under the influence of a wick[ed] spirit [p. 158]
when folly, and that which militates against truth and righteousness, rears its deformed head.
Therefore in the spirit of my calling, and in view of the authority of the priesthood which has been confered upon me, it was my duty to reprove whatever I considered to be wrong; fondly hoping in my heart, that all parties, would think it right; and therefore humble themselves, that satan might not take the advantage of us, and hinder the progress of our school.— Now I want you should bear with me, notwithstanding my plainness.
I would say to you then, that my feelings were grieved when you interupted in his speech. I thought that you should have considered your relation to him in your Apostleship: And not have manifested any divission of sentiment, between you & him, for the surrounding multitude to take the advantage of.
Therefore by way of entreaty, on account of the anxiety I had for you, & your influence & welfare in society, I said unto you do not have any feeling, or something to that amount.—
Why I am thus particular, is that if you have misunderstood my feelings or motives toward you; you may be corrected. But to proceed.— After the school was closed requested the privilege of speaking; you objected. However you said if he would not abuse the school, he might speak, observing at the same time that you would not allow any man to abuse the School in your house. You had no reason dear brother to suspect that would abuse the School.
Therefore my feelings were mortified, at those unnecessary observations. I undertook to reason with you; but you manifested an inconsiderate and stubborn spirit: I then dispared of benefiting you on the account of the spirit you manifested; which drew from me the expression that you was as ugly as the devil.
then commanded silence and I formed the determination to obey his mandate, and was about to leave the house, with the impression that you was under the influence of a wicked spirit [p. 158]
Page 158