History, 1838–1856, volume A-1 [23 December 1805–30 August 1834]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 363
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made the saints rejoice exceedingly
About this date, the Brethren in Zion received the following communication from in reply to their Petition of September 28th.
City of Jefferson, Executive Department.
October 19th, 1833.
To , , , , , and others:—
Your memorial soliciting my interposition against violence threatened you, and redresses for injuries received by a portion of the citizens of has been received, and its contents duly considered. I should think myself unworthy the confidence with which I have been honored by my fellow-citizens, did I not promptly employ all the means which the constitution and laws have placed at my disposal, to avert the calamities with which you are threatened.
Ours is a government of laws, to them we owe all obedience, and their faithful administration is the best guarantee for the enjoyment of our rights. [HC 1:423]
No citizen, nor number of citizens, have a right, to take the redress of their grievances, whether real or imaginary, into their own hands: Such conduct strikes at the very existence of society, and subverts the foundation on which it is based. Not being willing to persuade myself that any portion of the Citizens of the State of are so lost to a sense of these truths as to require the exercise of force, in order to insure a respect for them.
After advising with the Attorney General and exercising my best judgment, I would advise you to make a trial of the efficacy of the laws. The Judge of your circuit is a conservator of the peace. If an affidavit is made before him, by any of you, that your lives are threatened, and you believed them in danger, it would be his duty to have the offenders [p. 363]
made the saints rejoice exceedingly
About this date, the Brethren in Zion received the following communication from in reply to their Petition of September 28th.
City of Jefferson, Executive Department.
October 19th, 1833.
To , , , , , and others:—
Your memorial soliciting my interposition against violence threatened you, and redress for injuries received by a portion of the citizens of has been received, and its contents duly considered. I should think myself unworthy the confidence with which I have been honored by my fellow-citizens, did I not promptly employ all the means which the constitution and laws have placed at my disposal, to avert the calamities with which you are threatened.
Ours is a government of laws, to them we owe all obedience, and their faithful administration is the best guarantee for the enjoyment of our rights. [HC 1:423]
No citizen, nor number of citizens, have a right, to take the redress of their grievances, whether real or imaginary, into their own hands: Such conduct strikes at the very existence of society, and subverts the foundation on which it is based. Not being willing to persuade myself that any portion of the Citizens of the State of are so lost to a sense of these truths as to require the exercise of force, in order to insure a respect for them.
After advising with the Attorney General and exercising my best judgment, I would advise you to make a trial of the efficacy of the laws. The Judge of your circuit is a conservator of the peace. If an affidavit is made before him, by any of you, that your lives are threatened, and you believed them in danger, it would be his duty to have the offenders [p. 363]
Page 363