History, 1838–1856, volume A-1 [23 December 1805–30 August 1834]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 508
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and after, <​hearing​> many threats, was liberated. The houses of several of our brethren in this have been forcibly entered by some of the inhabitants of , and a number of guns and small arms taken therefrom. Where the men were absent from their houses, loaded guns were [HC 2:117] presented to the females, and their lives threatened if they made resistance, as we have been informed, and have no doubt of the fact.
Your second order for the restoration of our arms, was received last mail; we have not yet done any thing with it. Hoping that the influence of the inhabitants of , will materially lessen if on the surrounding counties, and the people become more tranquil, we think it wisdom to defer petitioning for a guard, while there exists a hope of a compromise, &c.
We believe that the President would render us assistance in obtaining possession of our lands, if aided by the Executive of this state in a petition, and thereby put an end to serious evils that are growing out of the outrage. In a letter from your Excellency of April 20th., we had a word on the subject of petitioning. We should be pleased to hear further; and would here observe that no communications from the Executive, giving his opinion or advice, will be made public, if requested not to do so.— We are Respectfully, and with great regard your Obt.— Servants
. , .”
The drafting and signing of the above, was the last public act of that keeper of the last lord’s , , for he was attacked with the cholera the same day, and died in a few hours <​about the 24​> according to his own words, that he “would rather die than go forth to preach the gospel to the .[”] [HC 2:118]
The following is from the chairman of the committee of the mob, to our Lawyer,
, Mo June 26. 1834
Mr ,
Dear Sir; Since my return from I have been busily engaged in conversing with the most influential men of our county endeavoring to find out if possible what kind of a compromise will suit with [p. 508]
and after, hearing many threats, was liberated. The houses of several of our brethren in this have been forcibly entered by some of the inhabitants of , and a number of guns and small arms taken therefrom. Where the men were absent from their houses, loaded guns were [HC 2:117] presented to the females, and their lives threatened if they made resistance, as we have been informed, and have no doubt of the fact.
Your second order for the restoration of our arms, was received last mail; we have not yet done any thing with it. Hoping that the influence of the inhabitants of , will materially lessen on the surrounding counties, and the people become more tranquil, we think it wisdom to defer petitioning for a guard, while there exists a hope of a compromise, &c.
We believe that the President would render us assistance in obtaining possession of our lands, if aided by the Executive of this state in a petition, and thereby put an end to serious evils that are growing out of the outrage. In a letter from your Excellency of April 20th., we had a word on the subject of petitioning. We should be pleased to hear further; and would here observe that no communications from the Executive, giving his opinion or advice, will be made public, if requested not to do so.— We are Respectfully, and with great regard your Obt.— Servants
. , .”
The drafting and signing of the above, was the last public act of that keeper of the lord’s , , for he was attacked with the cholera the same day, and died about the 24 according to his own words, that he “would rather die than go forth to preach the gospel to the .” [HC 2:118]
The following is from the chairman of the committee of the mob, to our Lawyer,
, Mo June 26. 1834
Mr ,
Dear Sir; Since my return from I have been busily engaged in conversing with the most influential men of our county endeavoring to find out if possible what kind of a compromise will suit with [p. 508]
Page 508