History, 1838–1856, volume A-1 [23 December 1805–30 August 1834]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 546
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<​August 29.​> <​council​> he did not consider at the time that the had any intentions of throwing it at , because he might have hit him with it being so near to him as he was, it only fell to the ground near to them, (himself and ) but supposed that he had had it in his hand and only threw it down as usual, or as another man would. He further said that the reproofs given by president Smith at the time, were no more severe than he had often heard him give previously. That he did not consider him mad as has has been represented.
<​​> said that when the first came to the creek himself and his brother Joseph were forward, that while the teams were crossing brother Joseph asked whether it was adviseable to move onto the prairie to camp. After consultation it was first advised to camp in the bushes near the edge of the prairie. While making preparations to encamp, they were informed that a mob intended to make an attack upon them that night. They further consulted upon their situation, and himself and were requested by brother Joseph to go onto the edge of the prairie, where they might encamp. They looked out a place but it was near the bushes, and brother Joseph gave an order to go forward onto the prairie. Some complained of the [HC 2:154] order because they could not find fuel to cook their supper. They were told that it would be advisiable to carry wood for that purpose. Some further remarks were offered on the subject of a visit from the a mob, and preperations were made with the guns &c. Some fears were entertained for the teams and families yet crossing the creek, and it was thought adviseable to send back a company to guard and assist them over, among whom was . He then took the flag or standard (as he had previously carried it) and gave the word to move forward, and the te[a]ms immediately began to follow. After the company had come upon the prairie, himself [p. 546]
August 29. council he did not consider at the time that the had any intentions of throwing it at , because he might have hit him with it being so near to him as he was, it only fell to the ground near to them, (himself and ) but supposed that he had had it in his hand and only threw it down as usual, or as another man would. He further said that the reproofs given by president Smith at the time, were no more severe than he had often heard him give previously. That he did not consider him mad as has has been represented.
said that when the first came to the creek himself and his brother Joseph were forward, that while the teams were crossing brother Joseph asked whether it was adviseable to move onto the prairie to camp. After consultation it was first advised to camp in the bushes near the edge of the prairie. While making preparations to encamp, they were informed that a mob intended to make an attack upon them that night. They further consulted upon their situation, and himself and were requested by brother Joseph to go onto the edge of the prairie, where they might encamp. They looked out a place but it was near the bushes, and brother Joseph gave an order to go forward onto the prairie. Some complained of the [HC 2:154] order because they could not find fuel to cook their supper. They were told that it would be advisiable to carry wood for that purpose. Some further remarks were offered on the subject of a visit from a mob, and preperations were made with the guns &c. Some fears were entertained for the teams and families yet crossing the creek, and it was thought adviseable to send back a company to guard and assist them over, among whom was . He then took the flag or standard (as he had previously carried it) and gave the word to move forward, and the teams immediately began to follow. After the company had come upon the prairie, himself [p. 546]
Page 546