History, 1838–1856, volume A-1 [23 December 1805–30 August 1834]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 10 [addenda]
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for I wanted my brethren to fare as well as I did. (see page 481)
Addenda, Note 7 • 30 May–3 June 1834
<​Note 7​> Friday 30 and , went ahead into in disguise, to learn the feelings of the brethren people and procure some Powder— we passed through , our appearance excited considerable curiosity, and a great many questions were asked— the Spies that had followed us so long, pursued us very closely, changing their dress and horses several times a day. Brother Eleazer Miller with some half a dozen others joined the company with three horses, about noon, a little East of Rochester, this recruit was very seasonable, as many of our Horses were afflicted, as they very frequently are, in changing country, climate and food, many of the horses after eating the dry corn, and Prairie grass, would be seized with the colic and bloat very badly when brother would administer<​ed​> a dose of medicine mixed in a Quart-Stone Bottle, prepared as follows: a three penny paper of tobacco— half an ounce of Coperas, and two table spoon <​full​> of Cayenne Pepper, and the bottle filled with water, when he could not procure Whiskey— one half of a bottle constituted a dose, and would almost invariably cure a sick horse in a few minutes— and is worthy of remembrance— called his medicine 18 by 24. We encamped about three miles from on Spring Creek. and returned to the Camp with 2 kegs of Powder, and reported that the people were somewhat excited, more however from a curiosity to know where we were going, than from a desire to hinder us, a brother [blank] <​fill in his name​> came to see us with news that my brother had passed on west the day before, with a company about fifty miles north of us, saying “he has a fine company and they all look mighty pert.” I asked him to accompany us to , but he replied “I cannot” he went and staid at a Tavern over night with the Spies, who said they had followed us three hundred miles on purpose to take some advantage of us.
Saturday 31. In the morning this brother came to me and said,“I would be mighty glad to go with you, but my business is such, I cannot, will a hundred dollars do you any good?” I repllied “Yes, it will, for we are short of money.” He immediately mounted his horse and rode towards and within an hour after the had started he returned and said to me “I am mighty sorry I cannot go with you, here is a hundred dollars, and if I had had a few days notice, I could have got more.” At noon we halted for dinner, just in the Edge of a Timber when a man apparently drunk came to the camp, and said he had a large farm, 40 cows &c a little ways ahead, and if we would go there, he would give us all we wanted to eat and drink, feed our horses &c &c but I soon discovered that he was more sober than drunk, and that he was probably a spy. Near night we arrived at a small stream of Water about one mile from , where we found a paw paw bush in the road, which had been dropped as a signal for us to Camp, by , whom I had sent forward in the morning on horseback to select a camp ground and watch the movements of our enemies. Here we pitched our tents— Agreeably to my instruction, about sun set brother proclaimed aloud that there would be preaching under the Trees within the Camp at half past ten oclock on the Morrow. There was only one Stranger in the Camp to hear the appointment. had gone on to with his Pill bags to spend the night.
<​Sunday​> June 1. This morning at half past 10 our Trumpet, a common brass French horn, sounded in the Camp for preaching, there were some 2 or 300 of the people from and the surrounding Country, gathered under the Trees within our Camp, and a chest was brought out for the accommodation [p. 10 [addenda]]
for I wanted my brethren to fare as well as I did. (see page 481)
Addenda, Note 7 • 30 May–3 June 1834
Note 7 Friday 30 and , went ahead into in disguise, to learn the feelings of the people and procure some Powder— we passed through , our appearance excited considerable curiosity, and a great many questions were asked— the Spies that had followed us so long, pursued us very closely, changing their dress and horses several times a day. Brother Eleazer Miller with others joined the company with three horses, about noon, a little East of Rochester, this recruit was very seasonable, as many of our Horses were afflicted, as they very frequently are, in changing country, climate and food, many of the horses after eating the dry corn, and Prairie grass, would be seized with colic and bloat very badly brother administered a medicine mixed in a Quart-Stone Bottle, prepared as follows: a three penny paper of tobacco— half an ounce of Coperas, and two table spoon full of Cayenne Pepper, and the bottle filled with water, when he could not procure Whiskey— one half of a bottle constituted a dose, and would almost invariably cure a sick horse in a few minutes— and is worthy of remembrance— called his medicine 18 by 24. We encamped about three miles from on Spring Creek. and returned to the Camp with 2 kegs of Powder, and reported that the people were somewhat excited, more however from a curiosity to know where we were going, than from a desire to hinder us, a brother [blank] fill in his name came to see us with news that my brother had passed on west the day before, with a company about fifty miles north of us, saying “he has a fine company and they all look mighty pert.” I asked him to accompany us to , but he replied “I cannot” he went and staid at a Tavern over night with the Spies, who said they had followed us three hundred miles on purpose to take some advantage of us.
Saturday 31. In the morning this brother came to me and said,“I would be mighty glad to go with you, but my business is such, I cannot, will a hundred dollars do you any good?” I repllied “Yes, it will, for we are short of money.” He immediately mounted his horse and rode towards and within an hour after the had started he returned and said to me “I am mighty sorry I cannot go with you, here is a hundred dollars, and if I had had a few days notice, I could have got more.” At noon we halted for dinner, a man apparently drunk came to the camp, and said he had a large farm, 40 cows &c a little ways ahead, and if we would go there, he would give us all we wanted to eat and drink, feed our horses &c &c but I soon discovered that he was more sober than drunk, and that he was probably a spy. Near night we arrived at a small stream of Water about one mile from , where we found a paw paw bush in the road, which had been dropped as a signal for us to Camp, by , whom I had sent forward in the morning on horseback to select a camp ground and watch the movements of our enemies. Here we pitched our tents— Agreeably to my instruction, about sun set brother proclaimed aloud that there would be preaching under the Trees within the Camp at half past ten oclock on the Morrow. There was only one Stranger in the Camp to hear the appointment. had gone on to with his Pill bags to spend the night.
Sunday June 1. This morning at half past 10 our Trumpet, a common brass French horn, sounded in the Camp for preaching, there were some 2 or 300 of the people from and the surrounding Country, gathered under the Trees within our Camp, and a chest was brought out for the accommodation [p. 10 [addenda]]
Page 10 [addenda]