History, 1838–1856, volume A-1 [23 December 1805–30 August 1834]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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of the Speaker, when one “Squire Cook <​-[as I was called]-​> immediately took the stand and professing to be a most liberal free thinker spoke to the people very freely about one hour on his particular views, his manner and style were very unassuming and affable, he was listened to with great attention, and those present remarked he was one of the greatest reasoners they ever heard,” the free thinker was followed by Elder who delivered a very eloquent discourse “on practical piety”— spoke on the principle of free salvation, followed by Elder who set forth as necessary for Salvation— after a few moments recess, at 2 oclock P.M. the trumpet again sounded, and a large congregation from and the surrounding country appeared again in the grove, many of whom expressed a desire to hear “that Methodist man” again— so I called brother into my tent and requested him to preach an animated sermon on free grace, and told him he should have the Spirit— I then sent for Elder to my tent, as he [2 words illegible] <​and​> said to him I understand you are a restorationer, “Yes said he “I believe in that doctrine” well said I, I wish you would make a few remarks to the people on that subject after has done— I also sent for Elder to come in my tent, and said to him “ when these brethren get thro’ speaking to the people, I want <​wish​> you to make a few remarks, reasoning on the importance of a Union of all the different sects and denominations, these brethren complied with my request, and the congregation was also addressed by Elder on baptism for the remission of sins— by Hiram Stratton exhorting the people to obey the gospel, and Eleazer Miller gave a powerful exhortation— after the services of the day were closed, many strangers made remarks on the preaching they had heard— they thought was a Methodist, and were anxious he should stay in that country and preach, they supposed was a close Communion Baptist, a Campbellite or reformed Baptist— a Presbyterian— a Restorationer; a Unionist, and enquired very earnestly if we all belonged to one denomination— the brethren replied, some of us were Methodists, some Baptists— Campbellites— Restorationers &c &c at the close of the meeting, Sacrament was administered, and all professing Christians of every— denomination present were invited to partake— came down from with the people, attended meeting, and returned with them in the evening— after Supper he left , returned to the and reported that the people universally who had visited the Camp, expressed the highest satisfaction of <​with​> their treatment, <​and entertainment​> and the good order that prevailed in our midst,— that one gentleman said “he had visited the Camp and presumed he had questioned <​about​> one hundred of the men, that he <​and​> had <​received​> polite answers to all his questions, from every individual, but could not ascertain who they were, where they were going, or what was their business, and believed them a fine set of fellows, or a pack of damd knaves, and I can’t tell for my life which,”another intelligent gentleman remarked that he did not believe there was a College in the that could turn out such an eloquent set of preachers, as he had heard that day in the Camp said he had heard hundreds of such like remarks at , and the most perfect good humor prevailed throughout the Town—
Monday 2nd. We passed through , they undertook to count us, and I heard one man say, who stood in the door of a Cabinet Shop, that he had counted a little rising of 500, but he [p. 11 [addenda]]
of the Speaker, when “Squire Cook -[as I was called]- immediately took the stand and professing to be a most liberal free thinker spoke to the people very freely about one hour on his particular views, his manner and style were very unassuming and affable, he was listened to with great attention, and those present remarked he was one of the greatest reasoners they ever heard,” the free thinker was followed by Elder who delivered a very eloquent discourse “on practical piety”— spoke on the principle of free salvation, followed by Elder who set forth as necessary for Salvation— after a few moments recess, at 2 oclock P.M. the trumpet again sounded, and a large congregation from and the surrounding country appeared again in the grove, many of whom expressed a desire to hear “that Methodist man” again— so I called brother into my tent and requested him to preach an animated sermon on free grace, and told him he should have the Spirit— I then sent for Elder and said to him I understand you are a restorationer, “Yes said he “I believe in that doctrine” well said I, I wish you would make a few remarks to the people on that subject after has done— I also sent for Elder , and said to him “ when these brethren get thro’ speaking to the people, I wish you to make a few remarks, reasoning on the importance of a Union of all the different sects and denominations, these brethren complied with my request, and the congregation was also addressed by Elder on baptism for the remission of sins— by Hiram Stratton exhorting the people to obey the gospel, and Eleazer Miller gave a powerful exhortation— after the services of the day were closed, many strangers made remarks on the preaching they had heard— they thought was a Methodist, and were anxious he should stay in that country and preach, they supposed was a close Communion Baptist, a Campbellite or reformed Baptist— a Presbyterian— a Restorationer; a Unionist, and enquired very earnestly if we all belonged to one denomination— the brethren replied, some of us were Methodists, some Baptists— Campbellites— Restorationers &c at the close of the meeting, Sacrament was administered, and all professing Christians of every— denomination present were invited to partake— came down from with the people, attended meeting, and returned with them in the evening— after Supper he left , returned to the and reported that the people universally who had visited the Camp, expressed the highest satisfaction with their treatment, and entertainment and the good order that prevailed in our midst,— that one gentleman said “he had visited the Camp and presumed he had questioned about one hundred of the men, and had received polite answers to all his questions, , but could not ascertain who they were, where they were going, or what was their business, and believed them a fine set of fellows, or a pack of damd knaves, and I can’t tell for my life which,”another intelligent gentleman remarked that he did not believe there was a College in the that could turn out such an eloquent set of preachers, as he had heard that day in the Camp said he had heard hundreds of such like remarks at , and the most perfect good humor prevailed throughout the Town—
Monday 2nd. We passed through , they undertook to count us, and I heard one man say, who stood in the door of a Cabinet Shop, that he had counted a little rising of 500, but he [p. 11 [addenda]]
Page 11 [addenda]