History, 1838–1856, volume B-1 [1 September 1834–2 November 1838]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 651
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thus answering to three measures of meal, undergoing the purifying <​November 16.​> touch by a revelation of Jesus Christ, and the ministering of angels, who have already commenced this work in the last days, which will answer to the Leaven which leavened the whole lump. Amen.
So I close but shall continue the subject in another number. In the Bonds of the new and everlasting covenant. Joseph Smith Jr.— [HC 2:272]
<​x Letter from .​> The same day I received a letter from of which the following is a copy:
Dear Sir, Having a few leisure moments, I have at last concluded to do what my own judgment has long dictated would be right, but the allurements of many vices have long retarded the hand that would wield the pen to make inteligent the communication that I wish to send to you; and even now, that ambition which is a prevailing and prediminant principle, among the great mass of natural men, forbids that plainness of sentiment with which I wish to write; for know assuredly, Sir, to you I wish to unbosom my feelings, and unveil the secrets of my heart, as before the Emmeient Judge of all the earth. Be not surprised when I declare unto you, as the Spirit will bear record, that my faith is firm and unshaken in the things of the everlasting gospel; as it is proclaimed by the servants of the Latter Day Saints.
Dear Brother Joseph, (if I may be allowed the expression) when I consider the happy times, and peaceful moments, and pleasant seasons I have enjoyed with you, and this people; contrasted with my now degraded state, together with the high and important station I have held before God; and the abyss into which I have fallen, is a subject that swells my heart too big for utterance, and language is overwhelmed with feelings and looses its power of description; and as I desire to know the will of God concerning me, believing it is my duty to make known unto you my real situation: I shall, therefore, dispassionately proceed to give a true and untarnished relation.
I need not tell you that in former times I have preached the word, and endeavored to be instant in season and out of season, to reprove, rebuke, exhort, and faithfully <​to​> discharge discharge that trust reposed in me: But oh! with what grief, and lamentable sorrow, and anguish do I have to relate that I have fallen from that princely station, whereunto our God has called me. Reasons why are unnecessary, may the fact suffice; and beleive me when I tell you, that I have sunk myself, (since my last separation from this body,) in crimes of the deepest die; and that I may the better enable you to understand what my real sins are, I will mention (although pride forbids it,) some that I am not guilty of. My hands have not been stained with innocent blood; neither have I lain couched around the cottages of my fellow men, to sieze and carry of[f] the booty; nor have I slandered my neighbor, nor borne false testimony; nor taken unlawful hire; nor oppressed the widow nor the fatherless; neither [p. 651]
thus answering to three measures of meal, undergoing the purifying November 16. touch by a revelation of Jesus Christ, and the ministering of angels, who have already commenced this work in the last days, which will answer to the Leaven which leavened the whole lump. Amen.
So I close but shall continue the subject in another number. In the Bonds of the new and everlasting covenant. Joseph Smith Jr.— [HC 2:272]
x Letter from . The same day I received a letter from of which the following is a copy:
Dear Sir, Having a few leisure moments, I have at last concluded to do what my own judgment has long dictated would be right, but the allurements of many vices have long retarded the hand that would wield the pen to make inteligent the communication that I wish to send to you; and even now, that ambition which is a prevailing and prediminant principle, among the great mass of natural men, forbids that plainness of sentiment with which I wish to write; for know assuredly, Sir, to you I wish to unbosom my feelings, and unveil the secrets of my heart, as before the Emmeient Judge of all the earth. Be not surprised when I declare unto you, as the Spirit will bear record, that my faith is firm and unshaken in the things of the everlasting gospel; as it is proclaimed by the servants of the Latter Day Saints.
Dear Brother Joseph, (if I may be allowed the expression) when I consider the happy times, and peaceful moments, and pleasant seasons I have enjoyed with you, and this people; contrasted with my now degraded state, together with the high and important station I have held before God; and the abyss into which I have fallen, is a subject that swells my heart too big for utterance, and language is overwhelmed with feelings and looses its power of description; and as I desire to know the will of God concerning me, believing it is my duty to make known unto you my real situation: I shall, therefore, dispassionately proceed to give a true and untarnished relation.
I need not tell you that in former times I have preached the word, and endeavored to be instant in season and out of season, to reprove, rebuke, exhort, and faithfully to discharge that trust reposed in me: But oh! with what grief, and lamentable sorrow, and anguish do I have to relate that I have fallen from that princely station, whereunto our God has called me. Reasons why are unnecessary, may the fact suffice; and beleive me when I tell you, that I have sunk myself, (since my last separation from this body,) in crimes of the deepest die; and that I may the better enable you to understand what my real sins are, I will mention (although pride forbids it,) some that I am not guilty of. My hands have not been stained with innocent blood; neither have I lain couched around the cottages of my fellow men, to sieze and carry off the booty; nor have I slandered my neighbor, nor borne false testimony; nor taken unlawful hire; nor oppressed the widow nor the fatherless; neither [p. 651]
Page 651