History, 1838–1856, volume B-1 [1 September 1834–2 November 1838]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 747
image
or later;— they have not only signified the same to us, but we have advised them <​July 25. Joseph’s Letter Continued​> so to do, as fast as they can without incurring too much loss. It may be said that they have but little to lose if they lose the whole. But if they have but little that little is their all, and the imperious demands of the helpless, urge them to make a prudent disposal of the same. And we are highly pleased with a proposition in your preamble, suffering them to remain peaceably until a disposition can be made of their land, &c, which if suffered, our fears are at once hushed, and we have every reason to beleive, that during the remaining part of the residence of our friends in your , the same feelings of friendship and kindness will continue to exist, that have heretofore, and that when they leave you, you will have no reflection of sorrow to cast, that they have been sojourners among you.
To what distance or place they will remove, we are unable to say; in this they must be dictated in with judgement and prudence. They may explore the Territory of Wisconsin— they may remove there, or they may stop on the other side— of this we are unable to say; but be they where they will, we have this gratifying reflection, that they have never been the first, in an unjust manner, to violate the laws, injure their fellow men, or disturb the tranquility and peace under which any part of our country has heretofore reposed. And we cannot but beleive, that ere long the public mind must undergo a change, when it will appear to the satisfaction of all, that this people have been illy treated and abused without a cause, and when, as justice would demand, those who have been the instigators of their sufferings will be regarded as their true characters demand.
Though our religious principles are before the world; ready for the investigation of all men, yet we are aware that the sole foundation of all our the persecution against our friends, has arisen in consequence of the calumnies and misconstructions, without foundation in truth, or righteousness, in common with all other religious societies; at their first commencement; and should providence order that we rise not as others before us, to respectability and esteem, but be trodden down by the ruthless hand of extermination, posterity will do us the justice, when our persecutors are equally low in the dust, with ourselves, to hand down to suc[HC 2:460]ceeding generations, the virtuous acts and forbearance of a people, who sacrificed their reputation for their religion; and their earthly fortunes and happiness, to preserve peace, and save this land from being <​further​> drenched in blood.
We have no doubt but your very seasonable meditation, in the time of so great an excitement, will accomplish your most sanquine desire, in preventing further disorder; and we hope, gentlemen, that while you reflect upon the fact, that the Citizens of are urgent for our friends to leave you, that you will also bear in mind, that by their complying with your request to leave, is surrendering some of the dearest rights, and first, among those inherent principles, guaranteed in the constitutions of our country: and that human nature can be driven to a certain extent, when it will yield no farther. Therefore, while our friends suffer so much, and forego so many sacred rights, we sincerely hope, and we have every reason to expect it, that a suitable forbearance may be shown by the people of , which if done, the cloud which has been obscuring your horizon [p. 747]
or later;— they have not only signified the same to us, but we have advised them July 25. Joseph’s Letter Continued so to do, as fast as they can without incurring too much loss. It may be said that they have but little to lose if they lose the whole. But if they have but little that little is their all, and the imperious demands of the helpless, urge them to make a prudent disposal of the same. And we are highly pleased with a proposition in your preamble, suffering them to remain peaceably until a disposition can be made of their land, &c, which if suffered, our fears are at once hushed, and we have every reason to beleive, that during the remaining part of the residence of our friends in your , the same feelings of friendship and kindness will continue to exist, that have heretofore, and that when they leave you, you will have no reflection of sorrow to cast, that they have been sojourners among you.
To what distance or place they will remove, we are unable to say; in this they must be dictated with judgement and prudence. They may explore the Territory of Wisconsin— they may remove there, or they may stop on the other side— of this we are unable to say; but be they where they will, we have this gratifying reflection, that they have never been the first, in an unjust manner, to violate the laws, injure their fellow men, or disturb the tranquility and peace under which any part of our country has heretofore reposed. And we cannot but beleive, that ere long the public mind must undergo a change, when it will appear to the satisfaction of all, that this people have been illy treated and abused without cause, and when, as justice would demand, those who have been the instigators of their sufferings will be regarded as their true characters demand.
Though our religious principles are before the world; ready for the investigation of all men, yet we are aware that the sole foundation of all the persecution against our friends, has arisen in consequence of the calumnies and misconstructions, without foundation in truth, or righteousness, in common with all other religious societies; at their first commencement; and should providence order that we rise not as others before us, to respectability and esteem, but be trodden down by the ruthless hand of extermination, posterity will do us the justice, when our persecutors are equally low in the dust, with ourselves, to hand down to suc[HC 2:460]ceeding generations, the virtuous acts and forbearance of a people, who sacrificed their reputation for their religion; and their earthly fortunes and happiness, to preserve peace, and save this land from being further drenched in blood.
We have no doubt but your very seasonable meditation, in the time of so great an excitement, will accomplish your most sanquine desire, in preventing further disorder; and we hope, gentlemen, that while you reflect upon the fact, that the Citizens of are urgent for our friends to leave you, that you will also bear in mind, that by their complying with your request to leave, is surrendering some of the dearest rights, and first, among those inherent principles, guaranteed in the constitutions of our country: and that human nature can be driven to a certain extent, when it will yield no farther. Therefore, while our friends suffer so much, and forego so many sacred rights, we sincerely hope, and we have every reason to expect it, that a suitable forbearance may be shown by the people of , which if done, the cloud which has been obscuring your horizon [p. 747]
Page 747