History, 1838–1856, volume B-1 [1 September 1834–2 November 1838]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 848
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31 October 1838 • Wednesday
<​October 31—​> Wednesday 31. The Militia of guarded the city the past night and threw up a temporary fortification of waggons, timber &c on the South. The Sisters many of them were engaged in gathering up their most valuable effects, fearing a terrible battle in the morning, and that the houses might be fired and they obliged to flee. the enemy being five to one against us. About eight o’clock a flag was sent which was met by several of our people, and it was hoped that matters would be satisfactorily arranged after the officers had heard a true statement of all the <​’s treachery​> circumstances. went to meet the flag and secretly made an engagement
“1st. To give up their -[the Church]- leaders to be tried and punished. 2nd. To make an appropriation of their property, all who had taken up arms, to the payment of their debts, and indemnify for damage done by them. 3rd. That the balance should leave the , and be protected out by the Militia, but to be permitted to remain under protection until further orders were received from the Commander in Chief. 4th. to give up the arms of every description to be receipted for.”
The Enemy was re-inforced by about one thousand five hundred men to day and news of the destruction of property by the Mob, reached us from every quarter. Towards evening I was waited upon by who stated that the Officers of the Militia desired to have an interview with me, and some others, hoping that the difficulties might be settled without having occasion to carry into effect the exterminating orders, which they had received from the . I immediately complied with the request, <​Joseph enters the Camp & is taken Prisoner​> and in [HC 3:188] company with Elders and , and went into the Camp of the Militia. But judge of my surprise, when instead of being treated with that respect which is due from one Citizen to another, we were taken as Prisoners of War, and were treated with the utmost contempt. The officers would not converse with us, and the soldiers, almost to a man, insulted us as much as they felt disposed, breathing out threats against me and my companions. I [HC 3:189] cannot begin to tell the scene which I there witnessed. The Loud cries and yells of more than one thousand voices, which rent the air and could be heard for miles; and the horrid and blasphemous threats and curses which were poured upon us in torrents, were enough to appal the stoutest heart. in the evening we had to lie down on the cold ground surrounded by a strong guard, who were only kept back by the power of God from depriving us of life. We petitioned the officers to know why we were thus treated, but they utterly refused to give us any answer or to converse with us. After we arrived in the Camp Brother and eleven other brethren who were prisoners, volunteered, with permission of the Officers to carry Brother Carey into the city to his family having lain exposed to the Weather, for a show to the inhuman wretches, without having his wounds dressed, or nourished in any manner. He died soon after he reached home.
1 November 1838 • Thursday
<​November 1 Joseph sentenced to be Shot.​> Thursday November 1. Brother and were brought prisoners into Camp They held a Court Martial and sentenced us to be shot, on Friday morning, on the public square, as an ensample to the Mormons. However notwithstanding their sentence, and determination, they were [HC 3:190] not permitted to carry their murderous sentence into execution. Having an opportunity of speaking to General Wilson, I inquired of him the cause why I was thus treated, I told him I was not sensible of having done any thing worthy of such treatment that I had always been a supporter of the Constitution and of Democracy. His answer was “I know it, and that is the reason why I want to kill you, or have you killed.” The militia then went into the and without any restraint whatever, plundered the houses, and abused the innocent and unoffending inhabitants. They went to my house and drove my family out of doors. They carried away most of my property and left many destitute— declared he would have nothing to do with such cold blooded murder, and that he would withdraw his brigade in the morning. [p. 848]
31 October 1838 • Wednesday
October 31— Wednesday 31. The Militia of guarded the city the past night and threw up a temporary fortification of waggons, timber &c on the South. The Sisters many of them were engaged in gathering up their most valuable effects, fearing a terrible battle in the morning, and that the houses might be fired and they obliged to flee. the enemy being five to one against us. About eight o’clock a flag was sent which was met by several of our people, and it was hoped that matters would be satisfactorily arranged after the officers had heard a true statement of all the ’s treachery circumstances. went to meet the flag and secretly made an engagement
“1st. To give up their -[the Church]- leaders to be tried and punished. 2nd. To make an appropriation of their property, all who had taken up arms, to the payment of their debts, and indemnify for damage done by them. 3rd. That the balance should leave the , and be protected out by the Militia, but to be permitted to remain under protection until further orders were received from the Commander in Chief. 4th. to give up the arms of every description to be receipted for.”
The Enemy was re-inforced by about one thousand five hundred men to day and news of the destruction of property by the Mob, reached us from every quarter. Towards evening I was waited upon by who stated that the Officers of the Militia desired to have an interview with me, and some others, hoping that the difficulties might be settled without having occasion to carry into effect the exterminating orders, which they had received from the . I immediately complied with the request, Joseph enters the Camp & is taken Prisoner and in [HC 3:188] company with Elders and , and went into the Camp of the Militia. But judge of my surprise, when instead of being treated with that respect which is due from one Citizen to another, we were taken as Prisoners of War, and were treated with the utmost contempt. The officers would not converse with us, and the soldiers, almost to a man, insulted us as much as they felt disposed, breathing out threats against me and my companions. I [HC 3:189] cannot begin to tell the scene which I there witnessed. The Loud cries and yells of more than one thousand voices, which rent the air and could be heard for miles; and the horrid and blasphemous threats and curses which were poured upon us in torrents, were enough to appal the stoutest heart. in the evening we had to lie down on the cold ground surrounded by a strong guard, who were only kept back by the power of God from depriving us of life. We petitioned the officers to know why we were thus treated, but they utterly refused to give us any answer or to converse with us. After we arrived in the Camp Brother and eleven other brethren who were prisoners, volunteered, with permission of the Officers to carry Brother Carey into the city to his family having lain exposed to the Weather, for a show to the inhuman wretches, without having his wounds dressed, or nourished in any manner. He died soon after he reached home.
1 November 1838 • Thursday
November 1 Joseph sentenced to be Shot. Thursday November 1. Brother and were brought prisoners into Camp They held a Court Martial and sentenced us to be shot, on Friday morning, on the public square, as an ensample to the Mormons. However notwithstanding their sentence, and determination, they were [HC 3:190] not permitted to carry their murderous sentence into execution. Having an opportunity of speaking to General Wilson, I inquired of him the cause why I was thus treated, I told him I was not sensible of having done any thing worthy of such treatment that I had always been a supporter of the Constitution and of Democracy. His answer was “I know it, and that is the reason why I want to kill you, or have you killed.” The militia then went into the and without any restraint whatever, plundered the houses, and abused the innocent and unoffending inhabitants. They went to my house and drove my family out of doors. They carried away most of my property and left many destitute— declared he would have nothing to do with such cold blooded murder, and that he would withdraw his brigade in the morning. [p. 848]
Page 848