History, 1838–1856, volume C-1 [2 November 1838–31 July 1842]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 978
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<​November 28 Petition to Congress​> deputized a Committee of their leading men to make terms of peace with their Fellow Citizens of . An interview took place between them and a Committee of Citizens, at which it was agreed that [HC 4:27] the Mormons should leave the County of , and that the Citizens of should buy their lands. These terms were complied with. The Mormons removed to, and settled in the County of , and the Citizens never paid them value for their lands, many received nothing at all for their land— The Mormons by this removal sacrificed much both of money and feeling, but the sacrifice was made upon the altar of duty, for the peace of the Community— your memorialists would <​17 June 1854 , commenced revising for publication see Deseret News Vol 4 No. 16​> beg here to give what they believe a just explanation of the causes of the prejudice and persecution against the Mormons related above, and which will follow that there might have been some unworthy members among them cannot be denied. but many aver that as a community they were as moral, as upright, and as observant of the laws of the land as any body of people in the world. why then this prejudice and persecution? An Answer they trust will be found in the fact that they were a body of people distinct from their fellow Citizens in religious opinions, in their habits <​&​> in their associations. They were numerous enough to make the power of their numerical and moral force a matter of anxiety and dread to the political and religious parties by which they were surrounded, which arose not from what the Mormons had done, but from the fear of what they might do. In addition the Mormons have purchased of the settlers or of the Government <​or​> obtained by pre-emption the best lands in all those regions of the , and <​at​> the times of speculation, the Cupidity of many was aroused to possess those lands by driving off the Mormons and taking forcible possession, or constraining them to sell through fear and coercion at a price merely nominal. After the Mormons removed from , they settled in the County of as aforesaid— Your Memorialists do not deem it necessary for their purpose to detail the history of the progress, the cares and anxieties of the Mormons from the time they settled in in the year 1836 until the fall of the year 1838. They would however state, during all that time they deported themselves as good Citizens obeying the laws of the land, and the moral and religious duties enjoined by their faith. That there might have been some faithless among the faithful is possible. They would not deny that there might have been some who were a scandal to their brethren, and what society they would ask has not some unworthy member? Where is the sect? where the Community in which there cannot be found some, who trample under foot the laws of God and Man? They believe the Mormon community to have as few such as any other association, religious or political. Within [HC 4:28] the above period the Mormons continued to increase in wealth and numbers, until in the fall of the year 1838 they numbered — — — — — — — — — — about 15,000 souls— They purchased of the Government or of the Citizen, or held by pre-emption almost all the lands in the County of , and a portion of the lands in and Carroll. The County of was settled almost entirely by Mormons, and Mormons were rapidly filling up the Counties of [p. 978]
November 28 Petition to Congress deputized a Committee of their leading men to make terms of peace with their Fellow Citizens of . An interview took place between them and a Committee of Citizens, at which it was agreed that [HC 4:27] the Mormons should leave the County of , and that the Citizens of should buy their lands. These terms were complied with. The Mormons removed to, and settled in the County of , and the Citizens never paid them value for their lands, many received nothing at all for their land— The Mormons by this removal sacrificed much both of money and feeling, but the sacrifice was made upon the altar of duty, for the peace of the Community— your memorialists would 17 June 1854 , commenced revising for publication see Deseret News Vol 4 No. 16 beg here to give what they believe a just explanation of the causes of the prejudice and persecution against the Mormons related above, and which will follow that there might have been some unworthy members among them cannot be denied. but many aver that as a community they were as moral, as upright, and as observant of the laws of the land as any body of people in the world. why then this prejudice and persecution? An Answer they trust will be found in the fact that they were a body of people distinct from their fellow Citizens in religious opinions, in their habits & in their associations. They were numerous enough to make the power of their numerical and moral force a matter of anxiety and dread to the political and religious parties by which they were surrounded, which arose not from what the Mormons had done, but from the fear of what they might do. In addition the Mormons have purchased of the settlers or of the Government or obtained by pre-emption the best lands in all those regions of the , and at the times of speculation, the Cupidity of many was aroused to possess those lands by driving off the Mormons and taking forcible possession, or constraining them to sell through fear and coercion at a price merely nominal. After the Mormons removed from , they settled in the County of as aforesaid— Your Memorialists do not deem it necessary for their purpose to detail the history of the progress, the cares and anxieties of the Mormons from the time they settled in in the year 1836 until the fall of the year 1838. They would however state, during all that time they deported themselves as good Citizens obeying the laws of the land, and the moral and religious duties enjoined by their faith. That there might have been some faithless among the faithful is possible. They would not deny that there might have been some who were a scandal to their brethren, and what society they would ask has not some unworthy member? Where is the sect? where the Community in which there cannot be found some, who trample under foot the laws of God and Man? They believe the Mormon community to have as few such as any other association, religious or political. Within [HC 4:28] the above period the Mormons continued to increase in wealth and numbers, until in the fall of the year 1838 they numbered — — — — — — — — — — about 15,000 souls— They purchased of the Government or of the Citizen, or held by pre-emption almost all the lands in the County of , and a portion of the lands in and Carroll. The County of was settled almost entirely by Mormons, and Mormons were rapidly filling up the Counties of [p. 978]
Page 978