History, 1838–1856, volume C-1 [2 November 1838–31 July 1842]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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<​February 21​> they were guilty in part, of the charge preferred against them— said he presumed I was not present, when said men were tried, I replied in the negative; that I was not there, neither any body else that could be a witness in their favor. The Lawyers advised them to keep away if they desired the salvation of their lives. I observed that I had read the proceedings of the Legislature but did not now recollect them; but since yesterday I have been reflecting on the subject, and recollect a conversation I had with Mr. who was the bearer of the petition to Jefferson City, and he informed me, <​that​> the reason why they refused an investigation, was on account of the Upper Members being so violently opposed to it, that they used their utmost exertions, and finally succeeded in getting a majority against it; and the reason of their taking this course was, in consequence of one of their Members being in the Massacre at , viz Mr. Ashley. And was a leader of the first mob in , which the Militia were called out to suppress. said if it must come out in Congress, it should be fully investigated, and they the Committee, should have power to send for persons and papers,— For if <​we​> had a right to claim damages of the , so had they, if all were true concerning the acts alleged against the Mormons; that they had a right to ask the Government, to pay the War against the Mormons— But finally seemed to disapprove of the exterminating order, which was admitted to have existed by , or was issued by their Legislature, but that no one ever thought of carrying it into effect. He said that merely advised the Mormons to leave the : To which I replied ’s speech was before them; that I had stated some of its Contents yesterday; and if it were necessary, I could prove it by four or five hundred affidavits. Then stated something about the prisoners making their escape, and that he had no doubt but that they could have a fair trial in , for the Legislature to his certain knowledge, passed a law whereby they had a right to choose any County in the , to be tried in; to which I replied, that I understood such a law was passed; but notwithstanding they could not get their trials in the County wherein they desired; for they were forced to go to , whereas they desired to have their trials at Palmira; where they could get their Witnesses, as that was only sixteen miles from the , and the other was a great distance— He said certainly would not go contrary to law— I told him there were some affidavits in those documents that would tell him some things very strange concerning [HC 4:84] then wished to know if the affidavits were from any body else save Mormons;— I replied that there were some others; but how many I knew not— He then wanted to know how they were certified— Whether any Clerk’s name was attached in the business— I told him they were well authenticated by the Courts of Record; [p. 1019]
February 21 they were guilty in part, of the charge preferred against them— said he presumed I was not present, when said men were tried, I replied in the negative; that I was not there, neither any body else that could be a witness in their favor. The Lawyers advised them to keep away if they desired the salvation of their lives. I observed that I had read the proceedings of the Legislature but did not now recollect them; but since yesterday I have been reflecting on the subject, and recollect a conversation I had with Mr. who was the bearer of the petition to Jefferson City, and he informed me, that the reason why they refused an investigation, was on account of the Upper Members being so violently opposed to it, that they used their utmost exertions, and finally succeeded in getting a majority against it; and the reason of their taking this course was, in consequence of one of their Members being in the Massacre at , viz Mr. Ashley. And was a leader of the first mob in , which the Militia were called out to suppress. said if it must come out in Congress, it should be fully investigated, and they the Committee, should have power to send for persons and papers,— For if we had a right to claim damages of the , so had they, if all were true concerning the acts alleged against the Mormons; that they had a right to ask the Government, to pay the War against the Mormons— But finally seemed to disapprove of the exterminating order, which was admitted to have existed by , or was issued by their Legislature, but that no one ever thought of carrying it into effect. He said that merely advised the Mormons to leave the : To which I replied ’s speech was before them; that I had stated some of its Contents yesterday; and if it were necessary, I could prove it by four or five hundred affidavits. Then stated something about the prisoners making their escape, and that he had no doubt but that they could have a fair trial in , for the Legislature to his certain knowledge, passed a law whereby they had a right to choose any County in the , to be tried in; to which I replied, that I understood such a law was passed; but notwithstanding they could not get their trials in the County wherein they desired; for they were forced to go to , whereas they desired to have their trials at Palmira; where they could get their Witnesses, as that was only sixteen miles from the , and the other was a great distance— He said certainly would not go contrary to law— I told him there were some affidavits in those documents that would tell him some things very strange concerning [HC 4:84] then wished to know if the affidavits were from any body else save Mormons;— I replied that there were some others; but how many I knew not— He then wanted to know how they were certified— Whether any Clerk’s name was attached in the business— I told him they were well authenticated by the Courts of Record; [p. 1019]
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