History, 1838–1856, volume C-1 [2 November 1838–31 July 1842]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 1190
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<​April 7​> But the time has gone by when it was looked upon as a transient matter, or a bubble on the wave, and it is now taking a deep hold in the hearts and affections of all those who are noble minded enough to lay aside the prejudice of education, and investigate the subject with candor and honesty. The truth, like the sturdy oak, has stood unhurt amid the contending elements, which have beat upon it with tremendous force. The floods have rolled, wave after wave, in quick succession; and have not swallowed it up They have lifted up their voice, O Lord, the floods have lifted up their voice; but the Lord of Hosts is mightier than the mighty waves of the Sea,” nor have the flames of persecution, with all the influence of Mobs, been able to destroy it; but like Moses’ bush it has stood unconsumed, and now at this moment presents an important spectacle both to men and angels— Where can we turn our eyes to behold such another? We contemplate a people who have embraced a system of religion unpopular, and the adherence to which has brought upon them repeated persecutions— a people who for their love to God and attachment to his cause, have suffered hunger, nakedness perils and almost every privation— a people, who for the sake of their religion, have had to mourn the premature deaths of parents, husbands wives, and children,— a people who have preferred death to slavery and hypocrisy, and have honorably maintained their characters, and stood firm and immovable, in times that have tried men’s souls. Stand fast, ye Saints of God, hold on a little while longer, and the storms of life will be past, and you will be rewarded by that God whose servants you are, and who will duly appreciate all your toils and afflictions for Christ’s sake and the Gospel’s. Your names will be handed down to posterity as Saints of God and virtuous men. But we hope that those scenes of blood and gore will never more occur, but that many, very many such scenes as the present, will be witnessed by the Saints, and that in the , <​x​> the foundation of which as been so happily laid, will the Saints of the Most High continue to congregate from year to year in peace and safety.
From the kind and generous feelings, manifested by the Citizens of [HC 4:337] this , since our sojourn among them, we may continue to expect the enjoyment of all the blessings of civil and religious liberty, guaranteed by the Constitution. The Citizens of have done themselves honor in throwing the mantle of the Constitution over a persecuted and afflicted people; and have given evident proof, that they are not only in the enjoyment of the privileges of freemen themselves, but, that they willingly and cheerfully extend that invaluable blessing to others, and that they freely award to faithfulness and virtue their due. The proceedings of the Legislature in regard to the Citizens of this place have been marked with philanthropy and benevolence; and they have laid us under great and lasting obligations, in granting us the several liberal charters we now enjoy, and by which we hope to prosper, until our becomes the most splendid; our University the most learned; and our Legion the most effective; of any in the Union. In the language [p. 1190]
April 7 But the time has gone by when it was looked upon as a transient matter, or a bubble on the wave, and it is now taking a deep hold in the hearts and affections of all those who are noble minded enough to lay aside the prejudice of education, and investigate the subject with candor and honesty. The truth, like the sturdy oak, has stood unhurt amid the contending elements, which have beat upon it with tremendous force. The floods have rolled, wave after wave, in quick succession; and have not swallowed it up They have lifted up their voice, O Lord, the floods have lifted up their voice; but the Lord of Hosts is mightier than the mighty waves of the Sea,” nor have the flames of persecution, with all the influence of Mobs, been able to destroy it; but like Moses’ bush it has stood unconsumed, and now at this moment presents an important spectacle both to men and angels— Where can we turn our eyes to behold such another? We contemplate a people who have embraced a system of religion unpopular, and the adherence to which has brought upon them repeated persecutions— a people who for their love to God and attachment to his cause, have suffered hunger, nakedness perils and almost every privation— a people, who for the sake of their religion, have had to mourn the premature deaths of parents, husbands wives, and children,— a people who have preferred death to slavery and hypocrisy, and have honorably maintained their characters, and stood firm and immovable, in times that have tried men’s souls. Stand fast, ye Saints of God, hold on a little while longer, and the storms of life will be past, and you will be rewarded by that God whose servants you are, and who will duly appreciate all your toils and afflictions for Christ’s sake and the Gospel’s. Your names will be handed down to posterity as Saints of God and virtuous men. But we hope that those scenes of blood and gore will never more occur, but that many, very many such scenes as the present, will be witnessed by the Saints, and that in the , x the foundation of which as been so happily laid, will the Saints of the Most High continue to congregate from year to year in peace and safety.
From the kind and generous feelings, manifested by the Citizens of [HC 4:337] this , since our sojourn among them, we may continue to expect the enjoyment of all the blessings of civil and religious liberty, guaranteed by the Constitution. The Citizens of have done themselves honor in throwing the mantle of the Constitution over a persecuted and afflicted people; and have given evident proof, that they are not only in the enjoyment of the privileges of freemen themselves, but, that they willingly and cheerfully extend that invaluable blessing to others, and that they freely award to faithfulness and virtue their due. The proceedings of the Legislature in regard to the Citizens of this place have been marked with philanthropy and benevolence; and they have laid us under great and lasting obligations, in granting us the several liberal charters we now enjoy, and by which we hope to prosper, until our becomes the most splendid; our University the most learned; and our Legion the most effective; of any in the Union. In the language [p. 1190]
Page 1190