History, 1838–1856, volume C-1 [2 November 1838–31 July 1842]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 1196
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<​April 15​> rebellion, confusion, misrule, and disunion, and would if suffered to exist among us, destroy our union, and consequently our power, which flows from the spirit, through the priesthood— which spirit and power, and priesthood can only exist with the humble and meek of the Earth. Therefore beware, O ye priests of the Most High! lest ye are overcome by that spirit which would exalt you above your fellow laborers, and thus hurl you down to perdition, or do much injury to the cause of God. Be careful to respect, not the eloquence— not the smooth speeches— not the multitude of words— not the talents of men— but — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — the offices which God has placed in the Church. Let the members hearken to their officers, let the priests, teachers, and deacons, hearken to the Elders, and let the Elders hearken to the presiding officers of each church or Conference. And let all the churches and conferences hearken to the Counsel of those who are still left in this Country to superintend the affairs of the Church; and by so doing, a spirit of union will be preserved, and peace and prosperity will attend the people of God. We have seen fit to appoint our beloved brethren and fellow laborers and , to travel from conference to conference, and to assist in the general superintendence of the Church in this Country. These are men of experience and soundness of principle, in whose counsel the church may place entire confidence, so long as they uphold them by the prayer of faith. The Spirit of emigration has actuated the children of men from the time our first parents were expelled from the garden until now; it was this spirit that first peopled the plains of Shinar, and all other places; yes it was emigration that first broke upon the deathlike silence and [HC 4:345] loneliness of an empty earth, and caused the desolate land to teem with life, and the desert to smile with joy. It was emigration that first peopled England,— once a desolate Island, on which the foot of man had never had, but now abounding in towns and cities. It was emigration that turned the wilds of into a fruitful field, and besprinkled the wilderness with flourishing towns and cities, where a few years since the war whoop of the Savage, or the howl of wild beasts was heard in the distance. In short, it is emigration that is the only effectual remedy for the evils which now afflict the overpeopled countries of Europe. With this view of the subject, the saints, as well as thousands of others, seem to be actuated with the spirit of enterprize and emigration, and as some of them are calculating to emigrate to , and settle in the Colonies of our brethren, we would here impart a few words of Counsel on the subject of emigration. It will be necessary, in the first place for men of Capital to go on first and make large purchases of land, and erect mills, machinery, manufactories &c so that the poor who go from this Country can find employment. Therefore it is not wisdom for the poor to flock to that place extensively, until the necessary preparations are made— Neither is it wisdom for those who feel a spirit of benevolence to extend all their means in helping others to emigrate, and thus all arrive in a new Country empty handed. In all settlements there must be capital and labor united in order to flourish. The brethren will recollect that they are not going to enter upon cities [p. 1196]
April 15 rebellion, confusion, misrule, and disunion, and would if suffered to exist among us, destroy our union, and consequently our power, which flows from the spirit, through the priesthood— which spirit and power, and priesthood can only exist with the humble and meek of the Earth. Therefore beware, O ye priests of the Most High! lest ye are overcome by that spirit which would exalt you above your fellow laborers, and thus hurl you down to perdition, or do much injury to the cause of God. Be careful to respect, not the eloquence— not the smooth speeches— not the multitude of words— not the talents of men— but — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — the offices which God has placed in the Church. Let the members hearken to their officers, let the priests, teachers, and deacons, hearken to the Elders, and let the Elders hearken to the presiding officers of each church or Conference. And let all the churches and conferences hearken to the Counsel of those who are still left in this Country to superintend the affairs of the Church; and by so doing, a spirit of union will be preserved, and peace and prosperity will attend the people of God. We have seen fit to appoint our beloved brethren and fellow laborers and , to travel from conference to conference, and to assist in the general superintendence of the Church in this Country. These are men of experience and soundness of principle, in whose counsel the church may place entire confidence, so long as they uphold them by the prayer of faith. The Spirit of emigration has actuated the children of men from the time our first parents were expelled from the garden until now; it was this spirit that first peopled the plains of Shinar, and all other places; yes it was emigration that first broke upon the deathlike silence and [HC 4:345] loneliness of an empty earth, and caused the desolate land to teem with life, and the desert to smile with joy. It was emigration that first peopled England,— once a desolate Island, on which the foot of man had never had, but now abounding in towns and cities. It was emigration that turned the wilds of into a fruitful field, and besprinkled the wilderness with flourishing towns and cities, where a few years since the war whoop of the Savage, or the howl of wild beasts was heard in the distance. In short, it is emigration that is the only effectual remedy for the evils which now afflict the overpeopled countries of Europe. With this view of the subject, the saints, as well as thousands of others, seem to be actuated with the spirit of enterprize and emigration, and as some of them are calculating to emigrate to , and settle in the Colonies of our brethren, we would here impart a few words of Counsel on the subject of emigration. It will be necessary, in the first place for men of Capital to go on first and make large purchases of land, and erect mills, machinery, manufactories &c so that the poor who go from this Country can find employment. Therefore it is not wisdom for the poor to flock to that place extensively, until the necessary preparations are made— Neither is it wisdom for those who feel a spirit of benevolence to extend all their means in helping others to emigrate, and thus all arrive in a new Country empty handed. In all settlements there must be capital and labor united in order to flourish. The brethren will recollect that they are not going to enter upon cities [p. 1196]
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