History, 1838–1856, volume C-1 Addenda

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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when he fell. He with the rest of the Brethren suffered much from exposure and lack of food. He arrived at I believe in December where he engaged as Clerk in the Court house and remained there until the liberation of Joseph and from prison when the Saints settled in he removed there and was engaged as scribe to brother Joseph, he was also church clerk. When the Nauvoo legion was formed he received the office of Col and also aid-de-camp. In May 1841, he became associated with in the Editing of the Times & Seasons, On the 16th. of August he was seized with the same disease of which had died on the 7th., the attachment between them was so strong it seemed as tho’ they could not long be separated he died on the 27th. leaving one child, was interred on in the burying ground on the 29th. By his special request no military procession was formed at his Funeral.
Addenda • 25 September 1841
<​1841 Sepr. 25​>
An Extract from s Journal
Septr. 25th 1841. We passed a very rough night on Lake Michigan <​p 1226​> on our way to on board of the Steamer chesepeak; the Lake was also very rough this morning nearly all were sea sick. We left the Manitou Island lake Michigan at 4 O’Clock P. M. on the <​Steamer​> Chesapeake which contained 300 Passengers six of whom were members of the church, a large quantity of freight and coal 80 cords of wood 8 mules, Pigs, chickens, Geese, Ducks &c. we continued our journey towards without any interruption until half past 11 O’Clock at night when we were overtaken by a tremenduous storm of wind and rain it blew a hurricane and the Lake became as rough as it could be by the force of wind and such a scene as quickly followed I never before witnessed in my travels either by land or sea. The Captain officers, hands, and most of the passengers expected to go to the bottom of the Lake to have judged from outward appearances I should think there were twenty chances of being lost to one of being saved. yet I did not once expect to be lost for I believed the Lord would save me and my wife and child who were with me from a watery grave by some means. We were some 40 miles. from land when the gale struck us and I was awoke from a sound sleep by the cry “we are all lost” the first thought [p. 30]
when he fell. He with the rest of the Brethren suffered much from exposure and lack of food. He arrived at I believe in December where he engaged as Clerk in the Court house and remained there until the liberation of Joseph and from prison when the Saints settled in he removed there and was engaged as scribe to brother Joseph, he was also church clerk. When the Nauvoo legion was formed he received the office of Col and also aid-de-camp. In May 1841, he became associated with in the Editing of the Times & Seasons, On the 16th. of August he was seized with the same disease of which had died on the 7th., the attachment between them was so strong it seemed as tho’ they could not long be separated he died on the 27th. leaving one child, was interred in the burying ground on the 29th. By his special request no military procession was formed at his Funeral.
Addenda • 25 September 1841
1841 Sepr. 25
p 1226 We left the Manitou Island lake Michigan at 4 O’Clock P. M. on the Steamer Chesapeake which contained 300 Passengers six of whom were members of the church, a large quantity of freight and coal 80 cords of wood 8 mules, Pigs, chickens, Geese, Ducks &c. we continued our journey towards without any interruption until half past 11 O’Clock at night when we were overtaken by a tremenduous storm of wind and rain it blew a hurricane and the Lake became as rough as it could be by the force of wind and such a scene as quickly followed I never before witnessed in my travels either by land or sea. The Captain officers, hands, and most of the passengers expected to go to the bottom of the Lake to have judged from outward appearances I should think there were twenty chances of being lost to one of being saved. yet I did not once expect to be lost for I believed the Lord would save me and my wife and child who were with me from a watery grave by some means. We were some 40 miles. from land when the gale struck us and I was awoke from a sound sleep by the cry “we are all lost” the first thought [p. 30]
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