History, 1838–1856, volume C-1 Addenda

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 57
image
<​1842 February 1 ​> about one shilling for 60 lbs.; butter from 4d to 6d. per lb., while milch cows are to be had in plenty for about £3 per head, and other things in proportion. Millions on millions of acres of land lie before them unoccupied, with a soil as rich as Eden, and a surface as smooth, clear, and ready for the plough as the park scenery of England.
Instead of a lonely swamp or dense forest filled with savages, wild beasts and serpents, large cities and villages are springing up in their midst, with schools, colleges and temples. The mingled noise of mechanism, the bustle of trade, the song of devotion, are heard in the distance, while thousands of flocks and herds are seen grazing peacefully on the plains, and the fields and gardens smile with plenty, and the wild red men of the forest are only seen as they come on a friendly visit to the Saints, and to learn the way of the Lord.
Several large ships have been chartered by the Saints during the present fall and winter, and have been filled with emigrants, who have gone forth with songs of joy; and some of them are already safely in the promised land, while others are, doubtless, still tossing upon the ocean.
The expence of passage and provisions to , has, at no time this season, exceeded £4, and it is generally as low as three pounds fifteen shillings. This is remarkable, when we reflect that each passenger has provisions and water provided in plenty for ten weeks. But it is obtained at this low price by a union of effort among the Saints, and by the faithful and persevering exertions of their agents. For instance, they purchase provisions by the quantity, and duty free, and the moment they bid farewell to their native shores, they hoist the Flag of Liberty— the ensign of Zion— the stars and stripes of the American Union; and under its protection they completely and practically nullify the bread tax. They eat free bread, free tea, free sugar, free everything, and thus accomplish a journey of five thousand miles on the same money that it would cost to feed them for the same length of time in England.
Who that has a heart to feel or a soul to rejoice, will not be glad at so glorious a plan of deliverance? Who will not hail the messengers of the Latter Day Saints as the friends of humanity— the benefactors of mankind?
Thousands have gone, and millions more must go,
The Gentiles as a stream to Zion flow.
Yes, friends, this glorious work has but just commenced; and we [p. 57]
1842 February 1 about one shilling for 60 lbs.; butter from 4d to 6d. per lb., while milch cows are to be had in plenty for about £3 per head, and other things in proportion. Millions on millions of acres of land lie before them unoccupied, with a soil as rich as Eden, and a surface as smooth, clear, and ready for the plough as the park scenery of England.
Instead of a lonely swamp or dense forest filled with savages, wild beasts and serpents, large cities and villages are springing up in their midst, with schools, colleges and temples. The mingled noise of mechanism, the bustle of trade, the song of devotion, are heard in the distance, while thousands of flocks and herds are seen grazing peacefully on the plains, and the fields and gardens smile with plenty, and the wild red men of the forest are only seen as they come on a friendly visit to the Saints, and to learn the way of the Lord.
Several large ships have been chartered by the Saints during the present fall and winter, and have been filled with emigrants, who have gone forth with songs of joy; and some of them are already safely in the promised land, while others are, doubtless, still tossing upon the ocean.
The expence of passage and provisions to , has, at no time this season, exceeded £4, and it is generally as low as three pounds fifteen shillings. This is remarkable, when we reflect that each passenger has provisions and water provided in plenty for ten weeks. But it is obtained at this low price by a union of effort among the Saints, and by the faithful and persevering exertions of their agents. For instance, they purchase provisions by the quantity, and duty free, and the moment they bid farewell to their native shores, they hoist the Flag of Liberty— the ensign of Zion— the stars and stripes of the American Union; and under its protection they completely and practically nullify the bread tax. They eat free bread, free tea, free sugar, free everything, and thus accomplish a journey of five thousand miles on the same money that it would cost to feed them for the same length of time in England.
Who that has a heart to feel or a soul to rejoice, will not be glad at so glorious a plan of deliverance? Who will not hail the messengers of the Latter Day Saints as the friends of humanity— the benefactors of mankind?
Thousands have gone, and millions more must go,
The Gentiles as a stream to Zion flow.
Yes, friends, this glorious work has but just commenced; and we [p. 57]
Page 57