History, 1838–1856, volume D-1 [1 August 1842–1 July 1843]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 1367
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<​August 14​> deference in the consideration of the lives, safety, and welfare of others. But if this policy cannot accomplish the desired object, let our Charter and—— Municipality; free trade and sailors rights be our motto, and go-a-head David Crockett like, and lay down our lives like men, and defend ourselves to the best advantage we can to the very last. You are therefore hereby authorized and commanded, by virtue of the authority which I hold, and commission granted me by the Executive of this , to maintain the very letter, and spirit of the above contents of this letter, to the very best of your ability; to the extend of our lives, and our fortunes; and to the lives and the fortunes of the legion; as also all those who may volunteer their lives and fortunes with ours; for the defence of our wives and children, our fathers and our mothers; our homes, our grave yards, and our tombs; and our dead and their tombstones, and our dear bought American liberties with the blood of our fathers, and all that is dear and sacred to man. Shall we shrink at the onset? no! let every man’s brow be as the face of a Lion; let his heart be unshaken as the might oak, and his knee confirmed as the sapling of the Forest; and by the voice and loud roar of the Cannon; and the loud peals and thundering of Artillery; and by the voice of the thunderings of heaven as upon Mount Sinai; and by the voice of the heavenly hosts; and by the voice of the Eternal God; and by the voice of innocent blood; and by the voice of innocence; and by the voice of all that is sacred and dear to man, let us plead the justice of our cause; trusting in the arm of Jehovah, the Eloheem who sits enthroned in the heavens: that peradventure he may give us the victory; and if we bleed, we shall bleed in a good cause— in the cause of innocence and truth: and from henceforth will there not be a crown of glory for us? And will not those who come after us, hold our names in sacred—— remembrance? and will our enemies dare to brand us with cowardly reproach? With these considerations, I subscribe myself— Yours most faithfully and—— respectfully with acknowledgments of your high and honored trusts as Major General of the Legion— Joseph Smith, Mayor of the City of and Lieutenant General of the Legion of Militia— P. S. I want you to communicate all the information to me, of all the transactions, as they are going on daily, in writing, by the hand of my [HC 5:94] Aides-de-Camp. As I am not willing that any thing that goes from my hands to you should be made a public matter, I enjoin upon you to keep all things in your own bosom; and I want every thing that comes from you to come through my Aids. The bearer of this will be able to pilot them in a way that will not be prejudicial to my safety— Joseph Smith—“
I gave the foregoing letter to with a charge to deliver it to tomorrow. After considerable conversation on various subjects and partaking of dinner Emma accompanied by brothers and started for . The morning had been very wet and the roads were very muddy— It was difficult walking, they proceeded to the and entered a skiff in which they proceeded across the and then down the side of the — soon after they got on the water, the wind began to blow very hard and it was with much difficulty and apparent danger that they could proceed, but they continued on, and after considerable toil arrived opposite the City of . they went between the and crossed over the to . As soon as they landed the wind abated, and was nearly calm. wanted to return up the without the additional [p. 1367]
August 14 deference in the consideration of the lives, safety, and welfare of others. But if this policy cannot accomplish the desired object, let our Charter and—— Municipality; free trade and sailors rights be our motto, and go-a-head David Crockett like, and lay down our lives like men, and defend ourselves to the best advantage we can to the very last. You are therefore hereby authorized and commanded, by virtue of the authority which I hold, and commission granted me by the Executive of this , to maintain the very letter, and spirit of the above contents of this letter, to the very best of your ability; to the extend of our lives, and our fortunes; and to the lives and the fortunes of the legion; as also all those who may volunteer their lives and fortunes with ours; for the defence of our wives and children, our fathers and our mothers; our homes, our grave yards, and our tombs; and our dead and their tombstones, and our dear bought American liberties with the blood of our fathers, and all that is dear and sacred to man. Shall we shrink at the onset? no! let every man’s brow be as the face of a Lion; let his heart be unshaken as the might oak, and his knee confirmed as the sapling of the Forest; and by the voice and loud roar of the Cannon; and the loud peals and thundering of Artillery; and by the voice of the thunderings of heaven as upon Mount Sinai; and by the voice of the heavenly hosts; and by the voice of the Eternal God; and by the voice of innocent blood; and by the voice of innocence; and by the voice of all that is sacred and dear to man, let us plead the justice of our cause; trusting in the arm of Jehovah, the Eloheem who sits enthroned in the heavens: that peradventure he may give us the victory; and if we bleed, we shall bleed in a good cause— in the cause of innocence and truth: and from henceforth will there not be a crown of glory for us? And will not those who come after us, hold our names in sacred—— remembrance? and will our enemies dare to brand us with cowardly reproach? With these considerations, I subscribe myself— Yours most faithfully and—— respectfully with acknowledgments of your high and honored trusts as Major General of the Legion— Joseph Smith, Mayor of the City of and Lieutenant General of the Legion of Militia— P. S. I want you to communicate all the information to me, of all the transactions, as they are going on daily, in writing, by the hand of my [HC 5:94] Aides-de-Camp. As I am not willing that any thing that goes from my hands to you should be made a public matter, I enjoin upon you to keep all things in your own bosom; and I want every thing that comes from you to come through my Aids. The bearer of this will be able to pilot them in a way that will not be prejudicial to my safety— Joseph Smith—“
I gave the foregoing letter to with a charge to deliver it to tomorrow. After considerable conversation on various subjects and partaking of dinner Emma accompanied by brothers and started for . The morning had been very wet and the roads were very muddy— It was difficult walking, they proceeded to the and entered a skiff in which they proceeded across the and then down the side of the — soon after they got on the water, the wind began to blow very hard and it was with much difficulty and apparent danger that they could proceed, but they continued on, and after considerable toil arrived opposite the City of . they went between the and crossed over the to . As soon as they landed the wind abated, and was nearly calm. wanted to return up the without the additional [p. 1367]
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