History, 1838–1856, volume D-1 [1 August 1842–1 July 1843]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 1371
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<​August 16​> kept the faith and overcame the world. Tell the children it is well with their Father, as yet; and that he remains in fervent prayer to Almighty God for the safety of—— himself, and for you, and for them. Tell that it shall be well with her Son, whether in life or in death; for thus saith the Lord God; Tell her that I remember her all the while, as well as , and all the rest; they all must be of good cheer. Tell to be sure and not fail to carry out my instructions, but at the same time if the Militia does not come, and we should get any favorable information all may be well yet. Yours in haste, Your affectionate husband until death, through all eternity, for evermore. Joseph Smith.
P. S. I want you to write to , and get him to make affidavit to all he knows about and forward it. I also want you to ascertain from whether he will conform to what I have requested . and you must write me an answer per bearer, giving me all the news you have, and what is the appearance of things this morning— J.S.”
I also wrote as follows
“Head Quarters, Legion, August 16 1842— — Beloved brother and friend— those few lines which I received from you, written on the 15th., were to me like apples of Gold in pictures of silver. I rejoice with exceeding great joy to be associated in the high and responsible stations which we hold, whose mind and feelings and heart are so congenial with my own. I love that soul that [HC 5:105] is so nobly entabernacled in that clay of yours, may God Almighty grant that it may be satiated with seeing a fulfilment of every virtuous and manly desire that you possess, may we be able to triumph gloriously over those who seek our destruction and overthrow, which I believe we shall, the news you wrote me was more favorable than that which was communicated by the Brethren, they seemed a little agitated for my safety, and advised me for the , but I succeeded admirably in calming all their fears, but nevertheless as I said in my former letter, I was willing to exile myself for months and years, if it would be for the welfare and safety of the people, and I do not know but it would be as well for me to take a trip to the , and remain until arrangements can be made for my most perfect safety when I returned, these are therefore to confer with you on this subject, as I want to have a concert of action in every thing that I do, if I knew that they would oppress me alone, and let the rest of you dwell peaceably and quietly, I think it would be the wisest plan to absent myself for a little season, if by that means we could prevent the effusion of blood. Please write and give me your mind on that subject and all other information that has come to hand to day, and what are the signs of the times— I have no news, for I am where I cannot get much, all is quiet and peaceable around I therefore wait with earnest expectation for your advices— I am anxious to know your opinion on any course that I may see proper to take, for in the multitude of Counsel there is safety. I add no more, but subscribe myself your faithful and most obedient servant, friend and brother— Joseph Smith— Lieutenant General of the Legion of Militia.”
The foregoing letters were delivered to who proceeded immediately [p. 1371]
August 16 kept the faith and overcame the world. Tell the children it is well with their Father, as yet; and that he remains in fervent prayer to Almighty God for the safety of—— himself, and for you, and for them. Tell that it shall be well with her Son, whether in life or in death; for thus saith the Lord God; Tell her that I remember her all the while, as well as , and all the rest; they all must be of good cheer. Tell to be sure and not fail to carry out my instructions, but at the same time if the Militia does not come, and we should get any favorable information all may be well yet. Yours in haste, Your affectionate husband until death, through all eternity, for evermore. Joseph Smith.
P. S. I want you to write to , and get him to make affidavit to all he knows about and forward it. I also want you to ascertain from whether he will conform to what I have requested . and you must write me an answer per bearer, giving me all the news you have, and what is the appearance of things this morning— J.S.”
I also wrote as follows
“Head Quarters, Legion, August 16 1842— — Beloved brother and friend— those few lines which I received from you, written on the 15th., were to me like apples of Gold in pictures of silver. I rejoice with exceeding great joy to be associated in the high and responsible stations which we hold, whose mind and feelings and heart are so congenial with my own. I love that soul that [HC 5:105] is so nobly entabernacled in that clay of yours, may God Almighty grant that it may be satiated with seeing a fulfilment of every virtuous and manly desire that you possess, may we be able to triumph gloriously over those who seek our destruction and overthrow, which I believe we shall, the news you wrote me was more favorable than that which was communicated by the Brethren, they seemed a little agitated for my safety, and advised me for the , but I succeeded admirably in calming all their fears, but nevertheless as I said in my former letter, I was willing to exile myself for months and years, if it would be for the welfare and safety of the people, and I do not know but it would be as well for me to take a trip to the , and remain until arrangements can be made for my most perfect safety when I returned, these are therefore to confer with you on this subject, as I want to have a concert of action in every thing that I do, if I knew that they would oppress me alone, and let the rest of you dwell peaceably and quietly, I think it would be the wisest plan to absent myself for a little season, if by that means we could prevent the effusion of blood. Please write and give me your mind on that subject and all other information that has come to hand to day, and what are the signs of the times— I have no news, for I am where I cannot get much, all is quiet and peaceable around I therefore wait with earnest expectation for your advices— I am anxious to know your opinion on any course that I may see proper to take, for in the multitude of Counsel there is safety. I add no more, but subscribe myself your faithful and most obedient servant, friend and brother— Joseph Smith— Lieutenant General of the Legion of Militia.”
The foregoing letters were delivered to who proceeded immediately [p. 1371]
Page 1371