History, 1838–1856, volume D-1 [1 August 1842–1 July 1843]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 1499
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<​March 15​> sneered contemptuously at the idea of their smaller, and younger brother taking the field, and like David’s brethren they thought that he was but a stripling, and that he would certainly fall by the hand of some of the great Goliah’s; but on the contrary while some of advanced years, noble mein, and possessing a more formidable appearance have given up the ghost, the little Wasp has held on the even tenor of his way, the untiring, unflinching supporter of integrity, righteousness and truth; neither courting the smiles, nor fearing the frowns of political demagogues, angry partizans, nor fawning sycophants. Partaking so much of the nature of the industrious bee, it has gathered honey from every flower, and its pages are now read with interest by a large, and respectable number of subscribers.
As the young gentleman is now nearly a year old, we propose on his birthday to put him on a new dress, and to make him double the size, that he may begin to look up in the world, and not be ashamed of associating with his older brethren; and as he has acted the part of a good samaritan, we propose giving him a new name.— Therefore his name shall no longer be called The Wasp, but the Neighbor.”
I prophecied in the name of the Lord Jesus Christ, that would get away honorably from the Missourians, and cautioned Peter Hawes to correct his boys, for if he did not curtail them in their wickedness they would eventually go to prison [HC 5:305]
I dreamed last night that I was swimming in a river of pure water, clear as crystal, over a school of fish of the largest size I ever saw, they were directly under my belly. I was astonished, and felt afraid that they might drown me, or do me injury
The Editor of the Wasp has the following editorial.
“What reliance can be placed upon a Legislature that will one session grant a charter to a city with “Perpetual Succession,” and another session take it away. We expect however that this honorable body believe in the common adage, “promises and pie crusts are made to be broken;” and we have sometimes ourselves seen boys crying for their marbles again, after they have given them away.
We suppose however with them that the words perpetual succession do not mean what they say. The house in the dignity of its standing passes a bill, at the request of the people, telling them that they shall have a charter granting them certain privileges, and telling them that it shall perpetual, without any repealing clause. It is made a law of, and the grand seal of state, appended to it. The people on the good faith of the go to work, and improve under the provisions of that charter; companies are formed, buildings are erected, and money expended; but by and by they find out that they have been leaning upon a broken reed, that there is no dependence to be placed in government; that they have broken their most sacred promises, violated their plighted faith, and wantonly and wickedly, sought to injure thousands of men who relied on their promises, by an unprecedented, unconstitutional, and tyrannical law, trampling under foot the faith of the , and virtually saying, that the members of the Legislature that granted the charter were all fools, or knaves, and that we the pure representatives of the people must break the plighted faith of the to set them right.”
The Herald gives a list of indebtedness of the several states who refuse to pay the same,—— as follows: $29,129,123, Georgia $3,184,323 [p. 1499]
March 15 sneered contemptuously at the idea of their smaller, and younger brother taking the field, and like David’s brethren they thought that he was but a stripling, and that he would certainly fall by the hand of some of the great Goliah’s; but on the contrary while some of advanced years, noble mein, and possessing a more formidable appearance have given up the ghost, the little Wasp has held on the even tenor of his way, the untiring, unflinching supporter of integrity, righteousness and truth; neither courting the smiles, nor fearing the frowns of political demagogues, angry partizans, nor fawning sycophants. Partaking so much of the nature of the industrious bee, it has gathered honey from every flower, and its pages are now read with interest by a large, and respectable number of subscribers.
As the young gentleman is now nearly a year old, we propose on his birthday to put him on a new dress, and to make him double the size, that he may begin to look up in the world, and not be ashamed of associating with his older brethren; and as he has acted the part of a good samaritan, we propose giving him a new name.— Therefore his name shall no longer be called The Wasp, but the Neighbor.”
I prophecied in the name of the Lord Jesus Christ, that would get away honorably from the Missourians, and cautioned Peter Hawes to correct his boys, for if he did not curtail them in their wickedness they would eventually go to prison [HC 5:305]
I dreamed last night that I was swimming in a river of pure water, clear as crystal, over a school of fish of the largest size I ever saw, they were directly under my belly. I was astonished, and felt afraid that they might drown me, or do me injury
The Wasp has the following editorial.
“What reliance can be placed upon a Legislature that will one session grant a charter to a city with “Perpetual Succession,” and another session take it away. We expect however that this honorable body believe in the common adage, “promises and pie crusts are made to be broken;” and we have sometimes ourselves seen boys crying for their marbles again, after they have given them away.
We suppose however with them that the words perpetual succession do not mean what they say. The house in the dignity of its standing passes a bill, at the request of the people, telling them that they shall have a charter granting them certain privileges, and telling them that it shall perpetual, without any repealing clause. It is made a law of, and the grand seal of state, appended to it. The people on the good faith of the go to work, and improve under the provisions of that charter; companies are formed, buildings are erected, and money expended; but by and by they find out that they have been leaning upon a broken reed, that there is no dependence to be placed in government; that they have broken their most sacred promises, violated their plighted faith, and wantonly and wickedly, sought to injure thousands of men who relied on their promises, by an unprecedented, unconstitutional, and tyrannical law, trampling under foot the faith of the , and virtually saying, that the members of the Legislature that granted the charter were all fools, or knaves, and that we the pure representatives of the people must break the plighted faith of the to set them right.”
The Herald gives a list of indebtedness of the several states who refuse to pay the same,—— as follows: 29,129,123, Georgia $3,184,323 [p. 1499]
Page 1499