History, 1838–1856, volume D-1 [1 August 1842–1 July 1843]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 1508
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A short sketch of the rise of the Young Gentlemen and Ladies relief society, is published in <​the Times and Seasons of this day.​>
<​April 1​> In the latter part of January 1843 a number of young people assembled at the house of Elder , who warned them [HC 5:320] against the various temptations to which youth is exposed, and gave an appointment expressly for the young at the house of Elder [E.] Billings, and another meeting was held in the ensuing week at bro. [Aaron] Farr’s schoolroom, which was filled to overflowing. delivered addresses, exhorting the young people to study the scriptures, and enable themselves to “give a reason for the hope within them,” and to be ready to go on to the stage of action, when their present instructors and leaders had gone behind the scenes, also to keep good company, and to keep pure and unspotted from the world.
The next meeting was appointed to be held at my house, and notwithstanding the inclemency of the weather, it was completely filled at an early hour. as usual delivered an address, warning his hearers against giving heed to their youthful passions, and exhorting them to be obedient and to pay strict attention to the advice and command of their parents, who were better calculated to guide the pathway of youth than they themselves.
My house being too small, the next meeting was appointed to be held in the over my . I addressed the young people for some time, expressing my gratitude to for having commenced this glorious work which would be the means of doing a great deal of good, and said, the gratitude of all good men and of the youth would follow him thro’ life, and he would always look back upon the winter of 1843 with pleasure. I experienced more embarrasment in standing before them, than I should before kings and nobles of the earth, for I knew the crimes of which they were guilty, and knew precisely how to address them; but that my young friends were guilty of none of them and therefore, that I hardly knew what to say. I advised them to organize themselves unto a society for the relief of the poor, and recommended to them a poor lame English brother (Maudesley) who wanted a house built that he might have a home amongst the Saints— that he had gathered a few materials for the purpose, but was unable to use them, and he has petitioned for aid. I advised them to choose a committee to collect funds for this purpose, and perform this charitable act as soon as the weather permitted. I gave them such advice as I deemed was calculated to guide their conduct thro’ life and prepare them for a glorious eternity
A meeting was appointed to carry out these suggestions, at which, was chosen President and Marcellus L. Bates, Clerk, Andrew Cahoon, C. V. Spencer, and Stephen Perry were appointed to draft a constitution for the Society, and the meeting adjourned to the 28th of March, when the said committee submitted the [HC 5:321] draft of a constitution consisting of 12 sections. The report was unanimously adopted, and the meeting proceeded to choose their officers. William Walker was chosen president, , vice president, treasurer, and James M. Monroe, secretary,— Stephen Perry, Marcellus L. Bates, R. A. Allred, William H. Kimball, and Garrett Ivans, were appointed a committee of vigilance. The meeting then adjourned until <​the​> next Tuesday evening.
The next meeting was addressed by Elders , and , whose instructions were listened to with breathless attention. [p. 1508]
A short sketch of the rise of the Young Gentlemen and Ladies relief society, is published in the Times and Seasons of this day.
April 1 In the latter part of January 1843 a number of young people assembled at the house of Elder , who warned them [HC 5:320] against the various temptations to which youth is exposed, and gave an appointment expressly for the young at the house of Elder [E.] Billings, and another meeting was held in the ensuing week at bro. [Aaron] Farr’s schoolroom, which was filled to overflowing. delivered addresses, exhorting the young people to study the scriptures, and enable themselves to “give a reason for the hope within them,” and to be ready to go on to the stage of action, when their present instructors and leaders had gone behind the scenes, also to keep good company, and to keep pure and unspotted from the world.
The next meeting was appointed to be held at my house, and notwithstanding the inclemency of the weather, it was completely filled at an early hour. as usual delivered an address, warning his hearers against giving heed to their youthful passions, and exhorting them to be obedient and to pay strict attention to the advice and command of their parents, who were better calculated to guide the pathway of youth than they themselves.
My house being too small, the next meeting was appointed to be held in the over my . I addressed the young people for some time, expressing my gratitude to for having commenced this glorious work which would be the means of doing a great deal of good, and said, the gratitude of all good men and of the youth would follow him thro’ life, and he would always look back upon the winter of 1843 with pleasure. I experienced more embarrasment in standing before them, than I should before kings and nobles of the earth, for I knew the crimes of which they were guilty, and knew precisely how to address them; but that my young friends were guilty of none of them and therefore, I hardly knew what to say. I advised them to organize themselves unto a society for the relief of the poor, and recommended to them a poor lame English brother (Maudesley) who wanted a house built that he might have a home amongst the Saints— that he had gathered a few materials for the purpose, but was unable to use them, and he has petitioned for aid. I advised them to choose a committee to collect funds for this purpose, and perform this charitable act as soon as the weather permitted. I gave them such advice as I deemed was calculated to guide their conduct thro’ life and prepare them for a glorious eternity
A meeting was appointed to carry out these suggestions, at which, was chosen President and Marcellus L. Bates, Clerk, Andrew Cahoon, C. V. Spencer, and Stephen Perry were appointed to draft a constitution for the Society, and the meeting adjourned to the 28th of March, when the said committee submitted the [HC 5:321] draft of a constitution consisting of 12 sections. The report was unanimously adopted, and the meeting proceeded to choose their officers. William Walker was chosen president, , vice president, treasurer, and James M. Monroe, secretary,— Stephen Perry, Marcellus L. Bates, R. A. Allred, William H. Kimball, and Garrett Ivans, were appointed a committee of vigilance. The meeting then adjourned until the next Tuesday evening.
The next meeting was addressed by Elders , and , whose instructions were listened to with breathless attention. [p. 1508]
Page 1508