History, 1838–1856, volume D-1 [1 August 1842–1 July 1843]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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<​April 6​> Opportunity was then offered to the elders to bring forward their appeals from other conferences, but no case was presented.
President Joseph continued his remarks and said; it is necessary that I make a proclamation concerning ; and also in relation to the economy of the church on that side of the .
The of has issued a writ in the same manner that did, and it is now held in , as a cudgel over my head. I was told by the Attorney that the of had no jurisdiction after the decision of the Supreme Court, and that all writs thus issued were legally dead. Appeals have been made to , but although he has no plausible excuse, he is not willing to kill that writ or to take it back; I will therefore advise you to serve them a trick that the devil never did, i.e:— come away and leave them— come into , pay taxes in , and let the Iowegians take their own course. I don’t care whether you come away or not. I do not wish to control you, but if you wish for my advice, I would say, let every man as soon as he conveniently can, come over here, for you can live in peace with us; we are all Green Mountain boys; Southerners, Northerners, Westerners, and every other kind of ers, and will treat you well, and let that know, that we don’t like to be imposed upon.
In relation to , it has been supposed that I made a great bargain with a certain great man there. In the beginning of August last, a stranger came to my house put on a very long face, and stated that he was in great distress, that he was a stranger in this , and having understood that I was benevolent, he had come to me for help. He said that he was about to lose $1,400 of property at Sheriff’s sale for $300 in cash; that he had money in which he expected in two or three days; that the sale would take place the next day, and that he wanted to hire some money for two or three days. I thought on the subject over night, and he came the next morning for an answer. I did not like the looks of the man, but thought I, he is a stranger. I then reflected upon the situation that I had frequently been placed in, and that I had often [HC 5:334] been a stranger in a strange land, and whenever I had asked for assistance I had obtained it, and it may be that he is an honest man; and if I turn him away I shall be guilty of the sin of ingratitude. I therefore concluded to loan him $200, in good faith, sooner than be guilty of ingratitude. He gave me his note for the same, and said ‘whenever you call on me you shall have the money.’ Soon after, when I was taken with ’s writ, I asked him for the money, but he answered, ‘I have not got it from , but shall have it in a few days.’ He then said, ‘since I saw you, a project has entered my mind, which I think may be profitable both for you and me. I will give you a quit claim deed for all the land you bought of , which is twenty thousand acres, you paid the notes and ought to have them, they are in my hands, as his agent, and I will give them up.’ ‘I also propose deeding to you, one half of my right to all my land in the territory, and all I ask is, for you to give your influence to help to build up .’ I answered, ‘I have not asked for your property, I don’t want it, and would not give a snap of my finger for it, but I will receive the papers, and if I find it as you say, I will use my influence to help to build up the place; but I wont give you any [p. 1518]
April 6 Opportunity was then offered to the elders to bring forward their appeals from other conferences, but no case was presented.
President Joseph continued his remarks and said; it is necessary that I make a proclamation concerning ; and also in relation to the economy of the church on that side of the .
The of has issued a writ in the same manner that did, and it is now held in , as a cudgel over my head. I was told by the Attorney that the of had no jurisdiction after the decision of the Supreme Court, and that all writs thus issued were legally dead. Appeals have been made to , but although he has no plausible excuse, he is not willing to kill that writ or to take it back; I will therefore advise you to serve them a trick that the devil never did, i.e:— come away and leave them— come into , pay taxes in , and let the Iowegians take their own course. I don’t care whether you come away or not. I do not wish to control you, but if you wish for my advice, I would say, let every man as soon as he conveniently can, come over here, for you can live in peace with us; we are all Green Mountain boys; Southerners, Northerners, Westerners, and every other kind of ers, and will treat you well, and let that know, that we don’t like to be imposed upon.
In relation to , it has been supposed that I made a great bargain with a certain great man there. In the beginning of August last, a stranger came to my house put on a very long face, and stated that he was in great distress, that he was a stranger in this , and having understood that I was benevolent, he had come to me for help. He said that he was about to lose $1,400 of property at Sheriff’s sale for $300 in cash; that he had money in which he expected in two or three days; that the sale would take place the next day, and that he wanted to hire some money for two or three days. I thought on the subject over night, and he came the next morning for an answer. I did not like the looks of the man, but thought I, he is a stranger. I then reflected upon the situation that I had frequently been placed in, and that I had often [HC 5:334] been a stranger in a strange land, and whenever I had asked for assistance I had obtained it, and it may be that he is an honest man; and if I turn him away I shall be guilty of the sin of ingratitude. I therefore concluded to loan him $200, in good faith, sooner than be guilty of ingratitude. He gave me his note for the same, and said ‘whenever you call on me you shall have the money.’ Soon after, when I was taken with ’s writ, I asked him for the money, but he answered, ‘I have not got it from , but shall have it in a few days.’ He then said, ‘since I saw you, a project has entered my mind, which I think may be profitable both for you and me. I will give you a quit claim deed for all the land you bought of , which is twenty thousand acres, you paid the notes and ought to have them, they are in my hands, as his agent, and I will give them up.’ ‘I also propose deeding to you, one half of my right to all my land in the territory, and all I ask is, for you to give your influence to help to build up .’ I answered, ‘I have not asked for your property, I don’t want it, and would not give a snap of my finger for it, but I will receive the papers, and if I find it as you say, I will use my influence to help to build up the place; but I wont give you any [p. 1518]
Page 1518