History, 1838–1856, volume D-1 [1 August 1842–1 July 1843]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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<​May 27​> Sisters Jarman, and Adams. and others gave their testimony, when they disfel[HC 5:409]lowshipped , and took his license until he made satisfaction to the aggrieved parties
Extract from s Journal.
“A rainy day. I arose sick in the morning in consequence of hard labor and being heated the day before I was confined to my bed the fore part of the day. In the afternoon I met in Council with the Twelve and first Presidency when the case of was brought up on trial, for improper conduct, slandering the Saints in for rejecting the Council of , Joseph, and the Twelve, and tearing to pieces the Saints, instead of building <​them​> up. plead for mercy, Joseph for justice and the Twelve decided according to testimony, and in all we had an interesting time. was refractory and out of order. Joseph wished the Twelve or to call the house to order. Several letters were read touching the subject after which made a lengthy speech trying to justify himself, was followed by President who plead in behalf of on the side of mercy. Elder gave his testimony against , then followed and both spoke several times, then President Joseph Smith arose and rebuked in the sharpest manner, said he had a lying Spirit, and had lied about him, and told him of many of his errors, after hearing the testimony Elder President of the Quorum of the Twelve, said he had made up his mind, and his decision was, that should give up his license and cease preaching until he should reform. President said he should not like to have such a decision given without another trial, and give a chance to get more testimony if he could. said he should then prefer to have the case turned over to the High Council. Prest. Joseph Smith said it was not the business of the High Council they could not try him, it belonged to the Twelve and them alone, for it was concerning matters abroad and not in . The High Council was to try cases that belong to this stake, and the Twelve to regulate the churches and Elders abroad in all the World, and ’s case comes under the jurisdiction of the Twelve, and them alone. [HC 5:410] President urged that the case should be put off until to morrow. President J. Smith said the case might be put off until to morrow at 10 o’Clock if it would do anybody any good. Prest. arose and spoke in the majesty of his calling, and among other remarks said his mind was made up and the remarks of Brother or of brother Joseph had not altered it, as for himself he would not sit upon the case another day, he considered the course had taken an insult upon his office and calling as an apostle of Jesus Christ, and he would not bear it, as for the rest of the Twelve they might do as they pleased, as for himself he would not submit to it. has despised and rejected the Council of the Presidency and the Twelve, has said they had no jurisdiction over him in and to say where he should go &c. but he and others will find there is power in the Twelve, we know through whom we have received our power, and who are our benefactors, and we are thankful for it. has never for the first time received our Council [p. 1562]
May 27 Sisters Jarman, and Adams. and others gave their testimony, when they disfel[HC 5:409]lowshipped , and took his license until he made satisfaction to the aggrieved parties
Extract from s Journal.
“A rainy day. . In the afternoon I met in Council with the Twelve and first Presidency when the case of was brought up on trial, for improper conduct, slandering the Saints in for rejecting the Council of , Joseph, and the Twelve, and tearing to pieces the Saints, instead of building them up. plead for mercy, Joseph for justice and the Twelve decided according to testimony, and in all we had an interesting time. was refractory and out of order. Joseph wished the Twelve or to call the house to order. Several letters were read touching the subject after which made a lengthy speech trying to justify himself, was followed by President who plead in behalf of on the side of mercy. Elder gave his testimony against , then followed and both spoke several times, then President Joseph Smith arose and rebuked in the sharpest manner, said he had a lying Spirit, and had lied about him, and told him of many of his errors, after hearing the testimony Elder President of the Quorum of the Twelve, said he had made up his mind, and his decision was, that should give up his license and cease preaching until he should reform. President said he should not like to have such a decision given without another trial, and give a chance to get more testimony if he could. said he should then prefer to have the case turned over to the High Council. Prest. Joseph Smith said it was not the business of the High Council they could not try him, it belonged to the Twelve and them alone, for it was concerning matters abroad and not in . The High Council was to try cases that belong to this stake, and the Twelve to regulate the churches and Elders abroad in all the World, and ’s case comes under the jurisdiction of the Twelve, and them alone. [HC 5:410] President urged that the case should be put off until to morrow. President J. Smith said the case might be put off until to morrow at 10 o’Clock if it would do anybody any good. Prest. arose and spoke in the majesty of his calling, and among other remarks said his mind was made up and the remarks of Brother or of brother Joseph had not altered it, as for himself he would not sit upon the case another day, he considered the course had taken an insult upon his office and calling as an apostle of Jesus Christ, and he would not bear it, as for the rest of the Twelve they might do as they pleased, as for himself he would not submit to it. has despised and rejected the Council of the Presidency and the Twelve, has said they had no jurisdiction over him in and to say where he should go &c. but he and others will find there is power in the Twelve, we know through whom we have received our power, and who are our benefactors, and we are thankful for it. has never for the first time received our Council [p. 1562]
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