History, 1838–1856, volume D-1 [1 August 1842–1 July 1843]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 1604
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<​July 1​> if he would use his influence to see that the laws were faithfully executed and to put down mob violence, and he gave us a paper, written by his own hand, stating that he would do so. He also requested him to call together the most influential men of the county on the next day that we might have an interview with them; to this he acquiesced, and accordingly the next day they assembled at the house of , and entered into a mutual covenant of peace, to put down mob violence and to protect each other in the enjoyment of their rights; after this we all parted with the best of feelings and each man returned to his own home. This mutual agreement of peace however did not last long; for but a few days afterwards the mob began to collect again until several hundreds rendezwused at Millport, a few miles distant from . They immediately commenced making aggressions upon the citizens called Mormons, taking away their hogs and cattle, and threatening them with extermination or utter extinction; saying that they had a cannon and there should be no compromise only at its mouth: frequently taking men, women and children prisoners, whipping them and lacerating their bodies with hickory withes, and tying them to trees and depriving them of food until they were compelled to gnaw the bark from the trees to which they were bound in order to sustain life; treating them in the most cruel manner they could invent or think of, and doing every thing they could to excite the indignation of the Mormon people to rescue them, in order that they might make that a pretext of an accusation for the breach of the law and that they might the better ex[HC 3:405]cite the prejudice of the populace and thereby get aid and assistance to carry out their hellish purposes of extermination. Immediately on the authentication of these facts, messengers were despspatched from to , Judge of the fifth judicial district of the State of , and also to , Commander-in-chief of that division, and , giving them information of the existing facts, and demanding immediate assistance. returned with the Messengers and went immediately to and from thence to Millport and he found the facts were true as reported to him;— that the citizens of that were assembled together in a hostile attitude to the amount of two or three hundred men, threatening the utter extermination of the Mormons, he immediately returned to and ordered out a sufficient military force to quell the mob. Immediately after they were dispersed and the army returned; the mob commenced collecting again soon after: we again applied for military aid, when came out with a force of sixty armed men to ; but they were in such a state of insubordination that he said he could not control them, and it was thought advisable by , and others that they should return home; ordered to call out the Militia of and defend the town against the mob, for said he, you have great reason to be alarmed, for he said from the Platte Country had come down with 200 armed men and had taken up their station at Hunter’s mill, a place distant about 17 or 18 miles [p. 1604]
July 1 if he would use his influence to see that the laws were faithfully executed and to put down mob violence, and he gave us a paper, written by his own hand, stating that he would do so. He also requested him to call together the most influential men of the county on the next day that we might have an interview with them; to this he acquiesced, and accordingly the next day they assembled at the house of , and entered into a mutual covenant of peace, to put down mob violence and to protect each other in the enjoyment of their rights; after this we all parted with the best of feelings and each man returned to his own home. This mutual agreement of peace however did not last long; for but a few days afterwards the mob began to collect again until several hundreds rendezwused at Millport, a few miles distant from . They immediately commenced making aggressions upon the citizens called Mormons, taking away their hogs and cattle, and threatening them with extermination or utter extinction; saying that they had a cannon and there should be no compromise only at its mouth: frequently taking men, women and children prisoners, whipping them and lacerating their bodies with hickory withes, and tying them to trees and depriving them of food until they were compelled to gnaw the bark from the trees to which they were bound in order to sustain life; treating them in the most cruel manner they could invent or think of, and doing every thing they could to excite the indignation of the Mormon people to rescue them, in order that they might make that a pretext of an accusation for the breach of the law and that they might the better ex[HC 3:405]cite the prejudice of the populace and thereby get aid and assistance to carry out their hellish purposes of extermination. Immediately on the authentication of these facts, messengers were despatched from to , Judge of the fifth judicial district of the State of , and also to , Commander-in-chief of that division, and , giving them information of the existing facts, and demanding immediate assistance. returned with the Messengers and went immediately to and from thence to Millport and he found the facts were true as reported to him;— that the citizens of that were assembled together in a hostile attitude to the amount of two or three hundred men, threatening the utter extermination of the Mormons, he immediately returned to and ordered out a sufficient military force to quell the mob. Immediately after they were dispersed and the army returned; the mob commenced collecting again soon after: we again applied for military aid, when came out with a force of sixty armed men to ; but they were in such a state of insubordination that he said he could not control them, and it was thought advisable by , and others that they should return home; ordered to call out the Militia of and defend the town against the mob, for said he, you have great reason to be alarmed, for he said from the Platte Country had come down with 200 armed men and had taken up their station at Hunter’s mill, a place distant about 17 or 18 miles [p. 1604]
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