History, 1838–1856, volume D-1 [1 August 1842–1 July 1843]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 1631
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<​July 1​> illness died. In the mean time they burned two hundred and three houses and one grist mill; these being the only residences of the Saints in .
The most part of one thousand and two hundred Saints, who resided in , made their escape to . I would here remark that among one of the companies that went to , was a woman named Sarah Ann Higbee who had been sick of chills and fever for many months; and another of the name of Keziah Higbee, who was under the most delicate circumstances, lay on the bank of the , without shelter, during one of the most stormy nights I ever witnessed while torrents of rain poured down during the whole night, and streams of the smallest <​size​> were magnified into rivers. The former [HC 3:439] was carried across the , apparently a lifeless corpse.— The latter was delivred of a fine son, on the bank, within twenty minutes after being carried across the , under the open canopy of heaven, and from which cause, I have every reason to believe, she died a premature death. The only consolation they received from the mob, under these circumstances, was “God damn you, do you believe in Joe Smith now?” During this whole time, the said Joseph Smith Senior, lived in , in the town of , according to the best of my knowledge and belief, a distance of eleven hundred miles from , and thinks that the church in had but little correspondence with him during that time We now mostly found ourselves in — some in negro cabins— some in gentlemen’s kitchens— some in old cabins that had been out of use for years— and others in the open air, without any thing to shelter them from the dreary storms of a cold and stormy winter.
Thus like men of servitude we went to work to obtain a scanty living among the inhabitants of . Every advantage which could be taken of a people under these circumstances was not neglected by the people of . A great degree of friendship prevailed between the Saints and this people under these circumstances for the space of two years; when the Saints commenced purchasing some small possessions for themselves: this together with the emigration created a jealousy on the part of the old citizens— that we were to be their servants no longer. This raised an apparent indignation and the first thing expressed in this excitement was: “you believe too much in Joe Smith,”— consequently they commenced catching the Saints in the Streets, whipping some of them until their bowels gushed out, and leaving others for dead in the streets. This so exasperated the Saints that they mutually agreed with the citizens of that they would purchase an entire new , north of and cornering on . There being not more than 40 or 50 inhabitants in this new they frankly sold out their possessions to the Saints, who immediately set in to enter the entire from the General Government. The having been settled, the issued an order for the organization of the and of a Regiment of militia, and an election being called for a Colonel of said regiment— I was elected unanimously, receiving 236 votes, in August 1837. Then organized with subaltern officers according to the statutes of the , and received legal and lawful commissions from for the same.
I think, sometime in the latter part of the winter said Joseph Smith [HC 3:440] moved to the district of country the Saints had purchased, and he settled down [p. 1631]
July 1 illness died. In the mean time they burned two hundred and three houses and one grist mill; these being the only residences of the Saints in .
The most part of one thousand and two hundred Saints, who resided in , made their escape to . I would here remark that among one of the companies that went to , was a woman named Sarah Ann Higbee who had been sick of chills and fever for many months; and another of the name of Keziah Higbee, who was under the most delicate circumstances, lay on the bank of the , without shelter, during one of the most stormy nights I ever witnessed while torrents of rain poured down during the whole night, and streams of the smallest size were magnified into rivers. The former [HC 3:439] was carried across the , apparently a lifeless corpse.— The latter was delivred of a fine son, on the bank, within twenty minutes after being carried across the , under the open canopy of heaven, and from which cause, I have every reason to believe, she died a premature death. The only consolation they received from the mob, under these circumstances, was “God damn you, do you believe in Joe Smith now?” During this whole time, the said Joseph Smith Senior, lived in , in the town of , according to the best of my knowledge and belief, a distance of eleven hundred miles from , and thinks that the church in had but little correspondence with him during that time We now mostly found ourselves in — some in negro cabins— some in gentlemen’s kitchens— some in old cabins that had been out of use for years— and others in the open air, without any thing to shelter them from the dreary storms of a cold and stormy winter.
Thus like men of servitude we went to work to obtain a scanty living among the inhabitants of . Every advantage which could be taken of a people under these circumstances was not neglected by the people of . A great degree of friendship prevailed between the Saints and this people under these circumstances for the space of two years; when the Saints commenced purchasing some small possessions for themselves: this together with the emigration created a jealousy on the part of the old citizens— that we were to be their servants no longer. This raised an apparent indignation and the first thing expressed in this excitement was: “you believe too much in Joe Smith,”— consequently they commenced catching the Saints in the Streets, whipping some of them until their bowels gushed out, and leaving others for dead in the streets. This so exasperated the Saints that they mutually agreed with the citizens of that they would purchase an entire new , north of and cornering on . There being not more than 40 or 50 inhabitants in this new they frankly sold out their possessions to the Saints, who immediately set in to enter the entire from the General Government. The having been settled, the issued an order for the organization of the and of a Regiment of militia, and an election being called for a Colonel of said regiment— I was elected unanimously, receiving 236 votes, in August 1837. Then organized with subaltern officers according to the statutes of the , and received legal and lawful commissions from for the same.
I think, sometime in the latter part of the winter said Joseph Smith [HC 3:440] moved to the district of country the Saints had purchased, and he settled down [p. 1631]
Page 1631