History, 1838–1856, volume D-1 [1 August 1842–1 July 1843]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 1634
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<​July 1​> not an enviable one— surrounded by mobs on one side, and popular opinion and prejudice against you on the other— gladly would I fly to your relief with my troops, but I fear it would be worse for you— most of them have relations living in this , and will not fight against them. One of my principal Captains namely and his men have already mutinized and have refused to obey my command. I can only say to you gentlemen, follow the command of , whom I have commanded to disperse all mobs found in , or to make them prisoners and bring them before the civil authorities forthwith. I wish to be distinctly understood that is vested with power and authority from me to disperse from your midst all who may be found on the side of mobocracy in the county of . I deeply regret gentlemen (knowing as I do the vigilance and perseverance of in the cause of freedom and rights of man) that I could not even be a soldier under his command in quelling the hellish outrages I have witnessed. In conclusion, gentlemen, be vigilant and persevere and allay every excitement of mobocracy. I have visited your place frequently— find you to be an industrious and thriving people, willing to abide the laws of the land.— And I deeply regret that you could not live in peace [HC 3:443] and enjoy the privileges of freedom. I shall now, gentlemen, return and dismiss my troops and put under arrest— leave the sole charge with , who I deem sufficiently qualified to perform according to law in all military operations necessary.”
then went to , when coming in sight of , he discovered about 100 of the mob holding some of the Saints in bondage, and tantalizing others in the most scandalous manner— at the sight of and company the mob took fright and such was their hurry to get away, some cut their bridle reins, and some pulled the bridles from their horses heads and went off with all speed.
I went to Millport, and on my way discovered that the inhabitants had become enraged at the orders of Generals and , and that they had sworn vengeance not only against the church but also against the two Generals together with , and to carry out their plans they entered into one of the most diabolical schemes ever entered into by man, and these hellish schemes were ingeniously carried out: Firstly, by loading their families and goods in covered wagons, setting fire to their houses, moving into the midst of the mob and crying out ‘the Mormons have driven us and burnt our houses’. In this situation I found the country between my house and Millport, and also found Millport evacuated and burnt. Runners were immediately sent to the , with the news that the Mormons were killing and burning every thing before them, and that great fears were entertained that they would reach Jefferson city before the runners could bring the news. This was not known by the church of Latter day Saints, until 2200 of the Militia had arrived within half a mile of , and they then supposed the Militia to be a mob. I was sent for from to — reached there the sun about one hour high in the morning of the 29th. of October, 1838, called upon Joseph Smith, enquired the cause of the great uproar, he declared, he did not know, but feared the Mob had increased their numbers, and was endeavoring to destroy us— I enquired of him if he had had any conversation with any one concerning the matter— he said he had not, as he was only a private citizen [p. 1634]
July 1 not an enviable one— surrounded by mobs on one side, and popular opinion and prejudice against you on the other— gladly would I fly to your relief with my troops, but I fear it would be worse for you— most of them have relations living in this , and will not fight against them. One of my principal Captains namely and his men have already mutinized and have refused to obey my command. I can only say to you gentlemen, follow the command of , whom I have commanded to disperse all mobs found in , or to make them prisoners and bring them before the civil authorities forthwith. I wish to be distinctly understood that is vested with power and authority from me to disperse from your midst all who may be found on the side of mobocracy in the county of . I deeply regret gentlemen (knowing as I do the vigilance and perseverance of in the cause of freedom and rights of man) that I could not even be a soldier under his command in quelling the hellish outrages I have witnessed. In conclusion, gentlemen, be vigilant and persevere and allay every excitement of mobocracy. I have visited your place frequently— find you to be an industrious and thriving people, willing to abide the laws of the land.— And I deeply regret that you could not live in peace [HC 3:443] and enjoy the privileges of freedom. I shall now, gentlemen, return and dismiss my troops and put under arrest— leave the sole charge with , who I deem sufficiently qualified to perform according to law in all military operations necessary.”
then went to , when coming in sight of , he discovered about 100 of the mob holding some of the Saints in bondage, and tantalizing others in the most scandalous manner— at the sight of and company the mob took fright and such was their hurry to get away, some cut their bridle reins, and some pulled the bridles from their horses heads and went off with all speed.
I went to Millport, and on my way discovered that the inhabitants had become enraged at the orders of Generals and , and that they had sworn vengeance not only against the church but also against the two Generals together with , and to carry out their plans they entered into one of the most diabolical schemes ever entered into by man, and these hellish schemes were ingeniously carried out: Firstly, by loading their families and goods in covered wagons, setting fire to their houses, moving into the midst of the mob and crying out ‘the Mormons have driven us and burnt our houses’. In this situation I found the country between my house and Millport, and also found Millport evacuated and burnt. Runners were immediately sent to the , with the news that the Mormons were killing and burning every thing before them, and that great fears were entertained that they would reach Jefferson city before the runners could bring the news. This was not known by the church of Latter day Saints, until 2200 of the Militia had arrived within half a mile of , and they then supposed the Militia to be a mob. I was sent for from to — reached there the sun about one hour high in the morning of the 29th. of October, 1838, called upon Joseph Smith, enquired the cause of the great uproar, he declared, he did not know, but feared the Mob had increased their numbers, and was endeavoring to destroy us— I enquired of him if he had had any conversation with any one concerning the matter— he said he had not, as he was only a private citizen [p. 1634]
Page 1634