History, 1838–1856, volume E-1 [1 July 1843–30 April 1844]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 1739
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<​October 1​> of law; without having violated the laws of that , or of the , and have had to wander as exiles in a strange land, without as yet, being able to obtain any redress for their grievances. We have hitherto adopted every legal measure; first, we petitioned to the state of , but in vain. We have Memorialized Congress, but they have turned a deaf ear to our supplication and referred us again to the , and justice (!!!) of . Doubtless many of the members of that honorable body were not sufficiently informed of the enormity and extent of the crimes of our persecutors, nor of the indelible stain which our national escutcheon has received through their inhuman daring. They have been allowed to revel in blood, and luxuriate in the miseries of the oppressed, and no man has laid it to heart. The fact is, that gentlemen of respectability and refinement, who live in a civilized society, find it difficult to believe that such enormities could be practiced in a republican government; but our wrong cannot slumber; such tyranny and oppression must not be passed over in silence; our injuries though past, are not forgotten by us, they still wrankle in our bosoms, and the blood of the innocent yet cries for justice; and as American citizens, we have appealed, and shall still continue to appeal to the legally constituted authorities of the land for redress, in the hopes that justice which has long slumbered, may be aroused in our defence; that the Spirit which burned in the bosoms of the patriots of seventy-six, may fire the souls of their descendants, and though slow, that their indignation may yet be aroused at the injustice of the oppressor, and that they may yet mete out justice to our adversaries, and step forward in the defence of the innocent.
We shall ask no one to commit themselves on our account; we want no steps taken but what are legal, constitutional, and honorable— but we are American citizens, and as American citizens, we have rights in common with all that live under the folds of the “star spangled banner.” Our rights have been trampled upon by lawless miscreants, we have been robbed of our liberties by mobocratic influence, and all those honorable ties that ought to govern and characterize Columbia’s sons have been trampled in the dust.— Still we are American citizens, and as American citizens we claim the privilege of being heard in the councils of our nation. We have been wronged, abused, robbed, and banished, and we seek redress. Such crimes cannot slumber in Republican America. The cause of common humanity would revolt at it, and Republicanism would hide its head in disgust.
We make these remarks for the purpose of drawing the attention of our brethren to this subject, both at home and abroad: that we may fix upon the man who will be the most likely to render us assistance in obtaining redress for our grievances— and not only give our own votes, but use our influence to obtain others, and if the voice of suffering in[HC 6:40]nocence will not sufficiently arouse the rulers of our nation to investigate our case, perhaps a vote of from fifty to one hundred thousand may rouse them from their lethargy.
We shall fix upon the man of our choice, and notify our friends duly.” [p. 1739]
October 1 of law; without having violated the laws of that , or of the , and have had to wander as exiles in a strange land, without as yet, being able to obtain any redress for their grievances. We have hitherto adopted every legal measure; first, we petitioned to the state of , but in vain. We have Memorialized Congress, but they have turned a deaf ear to our supplication and referred us again to the , and justice (!!!) of . Doubtless many of the members of that honorable body were not sufficiently informed of the enormity and extent of the crimes of our persecutors, nor of the indelible stain which our national escutcheon has received through their inhuman daring. They have been allowed to revel in blood, and luxuriate in the miseries of the oppressed, and no man has laid it to heart. The fact is, that gentlemen of respectability and refinement, who live in a civilized society, find it difficult to believe that such enormities could be practiced in a republican government; but our wrong cannot slumber; such tyranny and oppression must not be passed over in silence; our injuries though past, are not forgotten by us, they still wrankle in our bosoms, and the blood of the innocent yet cries for justice; and as American citizens, we have appealed, and shall still continue to appeal to the legally constituted authorities of the land for redress, in the hopes that justice which has long slumbered, may be aroused in our defence; that the Spirit which burned in the bosoms of the patriots of seventy-six, may fire the souls of their descendants, and though slow, that their indignation may yet be aroused at the injustice of the oppressor, and that they may yet mete out justice to our adversaries, and step forward in the defence of the innocent.
We shall ask no one to commit themselves on our account; we want no steps taken but what are legal, constitutional, and honorable— but we are American citizens, and as American citizens, we have rights in common with all that live under the folds of the “star spangled banner.” Our rights have been trampled upon by lawless miscreants, we have been robbed of our liberties by mobocratic influence, and all those honorable ties that ought to govern and characterize Columbia’s sons have been trampled in the dust.— Still we are American citizens, and as American citizens we claim the privilege of being heard in the councils of our nation. We have been wronged, abused, robbed, and banished, and we seek redress. Such crimes cannot slumber in Republican America. The cause of common humanity would revolt at it, and Republicanism would hide its head in disgust.
We make these remarks for the purpose of drawing the attention of our brethren to this subject, both at home and abroad: that we may fix upon the man who will be the most likely to render us assistance in obtaining redress for our grievances— and not only give our own votes, but use our influence to obtain others, and if the voice of suffering in[HC 6:40]nocence will not sufficiently arouse the rulers of our nation to investigate our case, perhaps a vote of from fifty to one hundred thousand may rouse them from their lethargy.
We shall fix upon the man of our choice, and notify our friends duly.” [p. 1739]
Page 1739