History, 1838–1856, volume E-1 [1 July 1843–30 April 1844]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 1745
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<​October 4​> where he is harbored, that we may have something more than vague assertions. They well-know that no such proof can be produced, but that the charges had their birth in the minds of one or two artless scoundrels, wreaking <​thirsting​> for revenge for their late disappointments. The whole of the charges are a tissue of false[HC 6:43]hoods, got up with the idea of intimadating a peaceable body of citizens; but, sir, we set such designing knaves at defiance, and laugh at their threats, treating them with utter contempt, but ever ready to abide by the truth. John Greenhow.”
Elder wrote the following letter:
Octr. 4th. 1843. To the First Presidency and Quorum of the Twelve Apostles— Greeting. Dear and much esteemed Brethren. I hasten to inform you of my arrival in Liverpool on the 30 day of Sept, in Company with Elders John Cairns, , and wife, James Houston and William G. Jermon. We left six of the Twelve in the city of the 2nd. day of September and came on board of the Ship “Columbus”, our passage money was five Dollars; we had a very hard passage, we were very much crowded in the Steerage, there was <​were​> 236 persons Dutch, Irish, English and Scotch, and as dirty as any I ever saw, we were not much sick, the weather was cold, had it been other wise we should have suffered more. there is A steamer leaves for to day, and I thought I would announce to you my arrival by this opportunity, and such information as I was in possession of, there is a ship to sail on the 14 inst, by which I shall write you again.
I found Elders , Thomas Ward and in and they were well, and as far as I was informed by them, that the Church is in a good state and on the increase, it numbers some where between Eight and nine thousand members, there is a great want of laborers in the vineyard; there has many of the first Elders <​have​> left this for , leaving their places vacant. I presented to the Presidency here your decision relative to the printing; and Elders Ward and they received it and manifested a desire to abide by it. wept when I shewed him your decision concerning him and his coming to by the first ship to see you face to face, the Brethren say here that he has been too hasty in some things and has given some an offence, but I do not as yet know anything derogatory to his character that I could say ought against him, I shall write you all the particulars as fast as I come in possession of them; as it regards the printing in this land We shall stop it after the next number is published, in it we wish to publish the news from for the benefit of the Saints, and to announce our arrival in this Country.
Permit me here to give you my opinion as it regards the printing in this land, and I will cheerfully abide your advice notwithstanding, after we stop the Star, we shall have during the shipping season to ad[HC 6:44]vertize and give general information in the emigration business to the Saints scattered abroad, I think it would be best to republish the Times and Seasons for the benefit of the church, the Duties on books are £2.10p per hundred weight, and there is now 16 00 Stars circulated here at the present and the demand for our [p. 1745]
October 4 where he is harbored, that we may have something more than vague assertions. They well-know that no such proof can be produced, but that the charges had their birth in the minds of one or two artless scoundrels, thirsting for revenge for their late disappointments. The whole of the charges are a tissue of false[HC 6:43]hoods, got up with the idea of intimadating a peaceable body of citizens; but, sir, we set such designing knaves at defiance, and laugh at their threats, treating them with utter contempt, but ever ready to abide by the truth. John Greenhow.”
Elder wrote the following letter:
Octr. 4th. 1843. To the First Presidency and Quorum of the Twelve Apostles— Greeting. Dear and much esteemed Brethren. I hasten to inform you of my arrival in Liverpool on the 30 day of Sept, in Company with Elders John Cairns, , and wife, James Houston and William G. Jermon. We left six of the Twelve in the city of the 2nd. day of September and came on board of the Ship “Columbus”, our passage money was five Dollars; we had a very hard passage, we were very much crowded in the Steerage, there were 236 persons Dutch, Irish, English and Scotch, and as dirty as any I ever saw, we were not much sick, the weather was cold, had it been other wise we should have suffered more. A steamer leaves for to day, and I thought I would announce to you my arrival by this opportunity, and such information as I was in possession of, there is a ship to sail on the 14 inst, by which I shall write you again.
I found Elders , Thomas Ward and in and they were well, and as far as I was informed by them, that the Church is in a good state and on the increase, it numbers some where between Eight and nine thousand members, there is a great want of laborers in the vineyard; many of the first Elders have left this for , leaving their places vacant. I presented to the Presidency here your decision relative to the printing; Elders Ward and received it and manifested a desire to abide by it. wept when I shewed him your decision concerning him and his coming to by the first ship to see you face to face, the Brethren say here that he has been too hasty in some things and has given some an offence, but I do not as yet know anything derogatory to his character that I could say ought against him, I shall write you all the particulars as fast as I come in possession of them; as it regards the printing in this land We shall stop it after the next number is published, in it we wish to publish the news from for the benefit of the Saints, and to announce our arrival in this Country.
Permit me here to give you my opinion as it regards the printing in this land, and I will cheerfully abide your advice notwithstanding, after we stop the Star, we shall have during the shipping season to ad[HC 6:44]vertize and give general information in the emigration business to the Saints scattered abroad, I think it would be best to republish the Times and Seasons for the benefit of the church, the Duties on books are £2.10p per hundred weight, and there is now 16 00 Stars circulated here at the present and the demand for our [p. 1745]
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