History, 1838–1856, volume E-1 [1 July 1843–30 April 1844]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 1748
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<​October 9​> , that said and others had given information, by letter, of President Smiths’ visit to , advising them to proceed to that place [HC 6:47] and arrest him there. He stated that in consequence of those, and other circumstances, and his unprofitableness to him as a counsellor, he did not wish to retain him in that station, unless those difficulties could be removed; but desired his salvation, and expressed his willingness that he should retain a place among the Saints.
Elder suggested the propriety of limiting the complaints and proofs to circumstances that had transpired since the last Conference.
President Joseph Smith replied, and showed the legality and propriety of a thorough investigation, without such limitation.
Elder plead, concerning the document from , Esq., that he received it in answer to some inquiries which he had transmitted to him— that he received it at a time when he was sick, and unable to examine it— did not know that it was designed for the perusal and benefit of President Joseph Smith— that he had, consequently, ordered it to be laid aside, where it remained until inquired for by Joseph Smith. He had never written to concerning the visit of Joseph Smith to , and knew of no other person having done so. That, concerning certain rumors of belligerent operations under ’s administration, he had related them, not to alarm or disturb any one, but that he had the rumors from good authorities, and supposed them well founded. That he had never received but one communication from , and that of a business character, except one addressed to him conjointly with Elder , which he handed over to President Smith— that he had never written any letters to .
The weather becoming inclement, Conference adjourned until Sunday 10 o’clock A. M.
Sunday 8th. 10 c’clock, A. M. Conference Assembled agreeably to adjournment, singing by the choir, and prayer by Elder .
Elder resumed his plea of defence. He related the circumstances of his reception in the city of , after his escape from — the cause of his delay in not going to the city of , on an express to which he had been appointed— and closed with a moving appeal to President Joseph Smith, concerning their former friendship, associations and sufferings; and expressed his willingness to resign his place, though with sorrowful and indescribable feelings. During this address, the sympathies of the congregation were highly excited.
Elder related a conversation he had had with Esq Johnson, in which he exonerated elder from the [HC 6:48] charge or suspicion of having had a treacherous correspondence with .
President Joseph Smith arose and explained to the congregation the supposed treacherous correspondence with , and expressed entire lack of confidence in his integrity and steadfastness, judging from their past intercourse.
President followed with remarks on the attribute of mercy in God, as that by which He influences, controls and conquors— and the propriety and importance of the Saint’s exercising the same attribute towards their fellows; [p. 1748]
October 9 , that said and others had given information, by letter, of President Smiths’ visit to , advising them to proceed to that place [HC 6:47] and arrest him there. He stated that in consequence of those, and other circumstances, and his unprofitableness to him as a counsellor, he did not wish to retain him in that station, unless those difficulties could be removed; but desired his salvation, and expressed his willingness that he should retain a place among the Saints.
Elder suggested the propriety of limiting the complaints and proofs to circumstances that had transpired since the last Conference.
President Joseph Smith replied, and showed the legality and propriety of a thorough investigation, without such limitation.
Elder plead, concerning the document from , Esq., that he received it in answer to some inquiries which he had transmitted to him— that he received it at a time when he was sick, and unable to examine it— did not know that it was designed for the perusal and benefit of President Joseph Smith— that he had, consequently, ordered it to be laid aside, where it remained until inquired for by Joseph Smith. He had never written to concerning the visit of Joseph Smith to , and knew of no other person having done so. That, concerning certain rumors of belligerent operations under ’s administration, he had related them, not to alarm or disturb any one, but that he had the rumors from good authorities, and supposed them well founded. That he had never received but one communication from , and that of a business character, except one addressed to him conjointly with Elder , which he handed over to President Smith— that he had never written any letters to .
The weather becoming inclement, Conference adjourned until Sunday 10 o’clock A. M.
Sunday 8th. 10 c’clock, A. M. Conference Assembled agreeably to adjournment, singing by the choir, and prayer by Elder .
Elder resumed his plea of defence. He related the circumstances of his reception in the city of , after his escape from — the cause of his delay in not going to the city of , on an express to which he had been appointed— and closed with a moving appeal to President Joseph Smith, concerning their former friendship, associations and sufferings; and expressed his willingness to resign his place, though with sorrowful and indescribable feelings. During this address, the sympathies of the congregation were highly excited.
Elder related a conversation he had had with Esq Johnson, in which he exonerated elder from the [HC 6:48] charge or suspicion of having had a treacherous correspondence with .
President Joseph Smith arose and explained to the congregation the supposed treacherous correspondence with , and expressed entire lack of confidence in his integrity and steadfastness, judging from their past intercourse.
President followed with remarks on the attribute of mercy in God, as that by which He influences, controls and conquors— and the propriety and importance of the Saint’s exercising the same attribute towards their fellows; [p. 1748]
Page 1748