History, 1838–1856, volume E-1 [1 July 1843–30 April 1844]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 1782
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<​November 29​> persecution, and the Society was at last compelled to leave the . An account of these unprovoked persecutions has been published to the world, yet we deem it not improper to embody a few of the most prominent items in this memorial, and lay them before your honorable body.
“On the 20th. of July 1833, a mob collected at , a deputation or Committee from which, called upon a few members of our church there, and stated to them that the , , and all mechanic shops belonging to our people must be closed forthwith, and the Society leave the immediately. These conditions were so unexpected and so hard, that a short tine was asked for, to consider on the subject before an answer could be given, which was refused, and when some of our men answered that they could not consent to comply with such propositions, the work of destruction commenced. The , a valuable two-story brick building, was destroyed by the mob, and with it much valuable property; they next went to the for the same purpose, but one of the owners thereof, agreeing to close it, they abandoned their design. A series of outrages was then commenced by the mob upon individual members of our Society: was dragged from his house and family, where he was first partially stripped of his clothes, and then tarred and feathered from head to foot. Mr. was also tarred at the same time. Three days afterwards the mob assembled in great numbers, bearing a red flag and proclaiming that, unless the Society would leave “en masse” every man of them should be killed. Being in a defenceless situation, to avoid a general massacre, a treaty was entered into and ratified, by which it was agreed that one half of the Society should leave the by the first of January, and the remainder by the first of April following. [HC 6:84] In October, while our people were gathering their crops and otherwise preparing to fulfil their part of the treaty, the mob again collected without any provocation, shot at some of our people, whipped others, threw down their houses, and committed many other depredations; the members of the Society were for some time harassed, both day and night, their houses assailed and broken open, and their women and children insulted and abused. The store house of and Company was broken open, ransacked and some of the goods strewed in the streets. These repeated assaults so aroused the indignant feelings of our people that a small party thereof on one occasion, when wantonly abused, resisted the Mob, a conflict ensued, in which one of our people, and some two or three of their assailants were killed. This unfortunate event raised the whole in arms, and we were required forthwith to surrender our arms and leave the . Fifty one guns were given up, which have never been returned, or paid for to this day. Parties of the mob, from 30 to 70 in number, then scoured the country in every direction, threatening and abusing women and children, until they were forced first to take shelter in the woods and prairies at a very inclement season of the year, and finally to make their escape to , where the people permitted them to take refuge for a time. After the Society had left , their buildings, amounting to about two hundred, were either burned or otherwise destroyed, with a great portion of their crops, as well as furniture, stock, &c. for which they have not as yet received any remuneration. [p. 1782]
November 29 persecution, and the Society was at last compelled to leave the . An account of these unprovoked persecutions has been published to the world, yet we deem it not improper to embody a few of the most prominent items in this memorial, and lay them before your honorable body.
“On the 20th. of July 1833, a mob collected at , a deputation or Committee from which, called upon a few members of our church there, and stated to them that the , , and all mechanic shops belonging to our people must be closed forthwith, and the Society leave the immediately. These conditions were so unexpected and so hard, that a short tine was asked for, to consider on the subject before an answer could be given, which was refused, and when some of our men answered that they could not consent to comply with such propositions, the work of destruction commenced. The , a valuable two-story brick building, was destroyed by the mob, and with it much valuable property; they next went to the for the same purpose, but one of the owners thereof, agreeing to close it, they abandoned their design. A series of outrages was then commenced by the mob upon individual members of our Society: was dragged from his house and family, where he was first partially stripped of his clothes, and then tarred and feathered from head to foot. Mr. was also tarred at the same time. Three days afterwards the mob assembled in great numbers, bearing a red flag and proclaiming that, unless the Society would leave “en masse” every man of them should be killed. Being in a defenceless situation, to avoid a general massacre, a treaty was entered into and ratified, by which it was agreed that one half of the Society should leave the by the first of January, and the remainder by the first of April following. [HC 6:84] In October, while our people were gathering their crops and otherwise preparing to fulfil their part of the treaty, the mob again collected without any provocation, shot at some of our people, whipped others, threw down their houses, and committed many other depredations; the members of the Society were for some time harassed, both day and night, their houses assailed and broken open, and their women and children insulted and abused. The store house of and Company was broken open, ransacked and some of the goods strewed in the streets. These repeated assaults so aroused the indignant feelings of our people that a small party thereof on one occasion, when wantonly abused, resisted the Mob, a conflict ensued, in which one of our people, and some two or three of their assailants were killed. This unfortunate event raised the whole in arms, and we were required forthwith to surrender our arms and leave the . Fifty one guns were given up, which have never been returned, or paid for to this day. Parties of the mob, from 30 to 70 in number, then scoured the country in every direction, threatening and abusing women and children, until they were forced first to take shelter in the woods and prairies at a very inclement season of the year, and finally to make their escape to , where the people permitted them to take refuge for a time. After the Society had left , their buildings, amounting to about two hundred, were either burned or otherwise destroyed, with a great portion of their crops, as well as furniture, stock, &c. for which they have not as yet received any remuneration. [p. 1782]
Page 1782