History, 1838–1856, volume E-1 [1 July 1843–30 April 1844]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 1785
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<​November 29​> Voted, that the appoint a Committee to get the names of Memorialists in this .
The appointed the assessors and collectors in their several wards
Voted that the same Committee collect means to purchase paper: Prest. go to La harpe, <​and​> Elder to , to procure signers.
The appointed Committees [illegible] to visit other places.
Joseph Smith the Mayor made some remarks— and his appeal to the green Mountain boys was read by . as follows.
“I was born in , Vermont, in 1805.— where the first quarter of my life, grew with the growth, and strengthened with the strength of that “first born” State of the “United Thirteen”. From the old “French War” to the final consummation of American Independence, my father’s, heart to heart, and shoulder to shoulder, with the noble fathers of our liberty, fought and bled; and, with the most of that venerable band of patriots, they have gone to rest,— bequeathing a glorious country with all her inherent rights to millions of posterity. Like other honest citizens, I not only, (when manhood came,) sought my own peace, prosperity, and happiness, but also the peace, prosperity, and happiness of my friends; and, with all the rights and realm before me, [HC 6:88] and the revelations of Jesus Christ, to guide me into all truth. I had good reason to enter into the blessings and privileges of an American citizen; the rights of a Green Mountain Boy, unmolested, and enjoy life and religion according to the most virtuous and enlightened, customs, rules and etiquette of the nineteenth century. But to the disgrace of the , it is not so. These rights and privileges, together with a large amount of property, have been wrested from me, and thousands of my friends, by lawless mobs in , supported by executive authority; and the crime of plundering our property; and the unconstitutional and barbarous act of our expulsion; and even the inhumanity of murdering men, women, and children, have received the pass-word of “justifiable” by legislative enactments, and the horrid deeds, doleful and disgraceful as they are, have been paid for by government.
In vain have we sought for redress of grievances and a restoration to our rights in the courts and legislature of . In vain have we sought for our rights and the remuneration for our property in the halls of Congress, and at the hands of the . The only consolation yet experienced from these highest tribunals, and mercy seats of our bleeding country, is, [“]that, our cause is just but the government has no power to redress us.”
Our arm<​s​> were forcibly taken from us by those marauders; and in spite of every effort to have them returned, the State of still retains them; and the ’ militia law, with this fact before the government, still compels us to do military duty, and for a lack of said arms the law forces us to pay our fines. As Shakespeare would say; “thereby hangs a tale.”
Several hundred thousand dollars worth of land in , was purchased at the ’ Land offices in that district of country; and the [p. 1785]
November 29 Voted, that the appoint a Committee to get the names of Memorialists in this .
The appointed the assessors and collectors in their several wards
Voted that the same Committee collect means to purchase paper: Prest. go to La harpe, and Elder to , to procure signers.
The appointed Committees to visit other places.
Joseph Smith the Mayor made some remarks— and his appeal to the green Mountain boys was read by . as follows.
“I was born in , Vermont, in 1805.— where the first quarter of my life, grew with the growth, and strengthened with the strength of that “first born” State of the “United Thirteen”. From the old “French War” to the final consummation of American Independence, my father’s, heart to heart, and shoulder to shoulder, with the noble fathers of our liberty, fought and bled; and, with the most of that venerable band of patriots, they have gone to rest,— bequeathing a glorious country with all her inherent rights to millions of posterity. Like other honest citizens, I not only, (when manhood came,) sought my own peace, prosperity, and happiness, but also the peace, prosperity, and happiness of my friends; and, with all the rights and realm before me, [HC 6:88] and the revelations of Jesus Christ, to guide me into all truth. I had good reason to enter into the blessings and privileges of an American citizen; the rights of a Green Mountain Boy, unmolested, and enjoy life and religion according to the most virtuous and enlightened, customs, rules and etiquette of the nineteenth century. But to the disgrace of the , it is not so. These rights and privileges, together with a large amount of property, have been wrested from me, and thousands of my friends, by lawless mobs in , supported by executive authority; and the crime of plundering our property; and the unconstitutional and barbarous act of our expulsion; and even the inhumanity of murdering men, women, and children, have received the pass-word of “justifiable” by legislative enactments, and the horrid deeds, doleful and disgraceful as they are, have been paid for by government.
In vain have we sought for redress of grievances and a restoration to our rights in the courts and legislature of . In vain have we sought for our rights and the remuneration for our property in the halls of Congress, and at the hands of the . The only consolation yet experienced from these highest tribunals, and mercy seats of our bleeding country, is, “that, our cause is just but the government has no power to redress us.”
Our arms were forcibly taken from us by those marauders; and in spite of every effort to have them returned, the State of still retains them; and the ’ militia law, with this fact before the government, still compels us to do military duty, and for a lack of said arms the law forces us to pay our fines. As Shakespeare would say; “thereby hangs a tale.”
Several hundred thousand dollars worth of land in , was purchased at the ’ Land offices in that district of country; and the [p. 1785]
Page 1785