History, 1838–1856, volume E-1 [1 July 1843–30 April 1844]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 1651
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<​July 1​> of whose society I had been deprived for four months. Just at dark, the Sheriff and jailer came to the with our supper. I sat down and ate. There were a number watching. After I had supped, I whispered to the Jailer to blow out all the candles but one, and step away from the door with that one. All this was done. The Sheriff then took me by the arm, and an apparent scuffle insued— so much so, that those who were watching, did not know who it was the Sheriff was scuffling with. The Sheriff kept pushing me towards the door, and I apparently resisting, [HC 3:465] until we reached the door, which was quickly opened and we both reached the street. He took me by the hand and bade me farewell, telling me to make my escape, which I did with all possible speed. The night was dark. After I had gone probably one hundred rods, I heard some person coming after me in haste. The thought struck me in a moment that the mob was after me. I drew a pistol and cocked it, determined not to be taken alive. When the person approaching me spoke, I knew his voice, and he speedily came to me. In a few minutes I heard a horse coming. I again sprung my pistol cock. Again a voice saluted my ears that I was acquainted with. The man came speedily up and said he had come to pilot me through the country. I now recollected I had left my wife in . I mentioned it to them, and one of them returned, and the other and pursued our journey as swiftly as we could. After I had gone about three miles, my wife overtook me in a carriage, into which I got, and we rode all night, It was an open carriage, and in the month of February 1839. We got to the house of an acquaintance just as day appeared. There I put up until the next morning, when I started again and reached a place called Tenney’s grove; and to my great surprise, I here found my family, and was again united with them, after an absence of four months, under the most painful circumstances. From thence I made my way to where I now am. My wife after I left her, went directly to and got the family under way, and all unexpectedly met at Tenney’s Grove. . [HC 3:466]
Messrs. , , , and [Hiram] Backman (the Counsel on my behalf) then respectively addressed the Court, and they exhorted the Mormons to stand for their rights, stand or fall, sink or swim, live or die. Mr Mason was counsellor for . [HC 5:473]
After which the following order was made.
This day came the said , in proper person, and the said having made return of said Writ of Habeas Corpus and produced the body of said in pursuance to the mandate of said Writ, and after hearing the evidence in support of said Petition. It is ordered and considered by the court that the said Joseph Smith Senior be discharged for the said arrest and imprisonment complained of in said Petition, and that the said Smith be discharged for want of substance in the Warrant upon which he was arrested as well as upon the merits of said case, and that he go hence without day [delay].
In testimony whereof I have hereunto set my hand and affixed the seal of said court, at the city of this 2nd day of July 1843. clerk
A public meeting in relation to the late arrest of General Joseph Smith.
Ill. July 1st 1843. At a meeting of the citizens of , held this day in the Assembly Hall, it was
Resolved unanimously, that Messrs Sanger and Dixon of the town of and the citizens of , Pawpaw Grove, and generally, in this [p. 1651]
July 1 of whose society I had been deprived for four months. Just at dark, the Sheriff and jailer came to the with our supper. I sat down and ate. There were a number watching. After I had supped, I whispered to the Jailer to blow out all the candles but one, and step away from the door with that one. All this was done. The Sheriff then took me by the arm, and an apparent scuffle insued— so much so, that those who were watching, did not know who it was the Sheriff was scuffling with. The Sheriff kept pushing me towards the door, and I apparently resisting, [HC 3:465] until we reached the door, which was quickly opened and we both reached the street. He took me by the hand and bade me farewell, telling me to make my escape, which I did with all possible speed. The night was dark. After I had gone probably one hundred rods, I heard some person coming after me in haste. The thought struck me in a moment that the mob was after me. I drew a pistol and cocked it, determined not to be taken alive. When the person approaching me spoke, I knew his voice, and he speedily came to me. In a few minutes I heard a horse coming. I again sprung my pistol cock. Again a voice saluted my ears that I was acquainted with. The man came speedily up and said he had come to pilot me through the country. I now recollected I had left my wife in . I mentioned it to them, and one of them returned, and the other and pursued our journey as swiftly as we could. After I had gone about three miles, my wife overtook me in a carriage, into which I got, and we rode all night, It was an open carriage, and in the month of February 1839. We got to the house of an acquaintance just as day appeared. There I put up until the next morning, when I started again and reached a place called Tenney’s grove; and to my great surprise, I here found my family, and was again united with them, after an absence of four months, under the most painful circumstances. From thence I made my way to where I now am. My wife after I left her, went directly to and got the family under way, and all unexpectedly met at Tenney’s Grove. . [HC 3:466]
Messrs. , , , and Hiram Backman (the Counsel on my behalf) then respectively addressed the Court, and they exhorted the Mormons to stand for their rights, stand or fall, sink or swim, live or die. Mr Mason was counsellor for . [HC 5:473]
After which the following order was made.
This day came the said , in proper person, and the said having made return of said Writ of Habeas Corpus and produced the body of said in pursuance to the mandate of said Writ, and after hearing the evidence in support of said Petition. It is ordered and considered by the court that the said Joseph Smith Senior be discharged for the said arrest and imprisonment complained of in said Petition, and that the said Smith be discharged for want of substance in the Warrant upon which he was arrested as well as upon the merits of said case, and that he go hence without day [delay].
In testimony whereof I have hereunto set my hand and affixed the seal of said court, at the city of this 2nd day of July 1843. clerk
A public meeting in relation to the late arrest of General Joseph Smith.
Ill. July 1st 1843. At a meeting of the citizens of , held this day in the Assembly Hall, it was
Resolved unanimously, that Messrs Sanger and Dixon of the town of and the citizens of , Pawpaw Grove, and generally, in this [p. 1651]
Page 1651