History, 1838–1856, volume E-1 [1 July 1843–30 April 1844]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 1850
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where Tom was? (meaning her husband.) Mrs. Pugmire answered she did not know. After this Mrs. Cartwright went out and met them returning from the waters of baptism, and shouted ‘Damn you I’ll dip ye’, and expressing her determination to have revenge upon Pugmire’s family she used a great deal of very bad language. Some of the neighbors (not belonging to the church) advised her not to speak so much against the Latter-day Saints, as she might yet become convinced of the truth of their doctrines and be baptized herself. She replied ‘I hope to God if ever I am such a damned fool that I’ll be drowned in the attempt.” A short time afterwards in consequence of her husband talking to her about the truths of the Gospel she consented to go to Pugmire’s house and hear for herself. After attending a few times she told her husband she had a dream in which she saw it was a fearful thing to fall into the hands of the living God, and requested to be baptized. Mrs. Pugmire talked with her reminding her of her harsh expressions, she confessed all, and said ‘I am very sorry, and as my conduct is known to all this neighborhood I do not wish to have my baptism public, but to have it done privately; and I wish no female to accompany me to the water but you’. On the night of her baptism (Nov. 23. 1843) she was conducted to the water by her husband, and Elder Pugmire witnessed by Mrs. Pugmire and James Moor. Previous to this time Elder Pugmire had baptized eight or ten persons in the same place. On arriving at the water they found the Creek had overflowed its banks in consequence of a heavy rain which had fallen that day. Elder Pugmire examined its banks, and concluded he could attend to the ordinance without going into the regular bed of the creek. This was done, but on raising Mrs. Cartwright, and as they were walking out, they both went under the water. It was afterwards discovered, that the water had undermined the bank, and it gave way under their feet; meantime Thomas Cartwright leapt into the creek and seized hold of his wife’s petticoat, but the water carried her off, and left the garment in his hand. James Moor got hold of Elder Pugmire by the hair of his head. Mrs. Pugmire holding Moor’s hand and thus they dragged him out. Moor then ran to the village to give the alarm, on his return he found Cartwright about one hundred yards from where he leapt in [HC 6:161] with his head above water, holding on to the stump of a tree; he said he could not have remained in that situation one minute longer. George Knowlen swam the stream and got him out, but his wife was not found until the day following, when she was found about two hundred yards from where the accident occurred standing upon her feet, with her head above water, the stream having fallen about two feet. On Pugmire reaching home, a Church of England minister had him arrested and dragged from his family the same evening and kept in custody of a Constable until a Coroner’s inquest was held on the body of the deceased. After she was buried, Cartwright was arrested, and both were sent to Chester jail to wait their trial before the Judge of Assize. They were in confinement six weeks and three days before their trial came on. The Judge (Whitehead) remarked to the Jury that baptism was an ordinance of our religion and that it was a mere accident which had occurred, he advised the jurymen to be very careful how they examined the case before them, that it was an ordinance instituted by God. (at that moment the Lord spoke by the voice of thunder which shook the court house) and advised the prisoners to be very careful in the future to select a proper place for the performance of that rite. They were then set free.
During their imprisonment Pugmire had a vision in which he was informed that they would be liberated & he told Cartwright to be of good cheer, for they certainly would be acquitted.” [p. 1850]
where Tom was? (meaning her husband.) Mrs. Pugmire answered she did not know. After this Mrs. Cartwright went out and met them returning from the waters of baptism, and shouted ‘Damn you I’ll dip ye’, and expressing her determination to have revenge upon Pugmire’s family she used a great deal of very bad language. Some of the neighbors (not belonging to the church) advised her not to speak so much against the Latter-day Saints, as she might yet become convinced of the truth of their doctrines and be baptized herself. She replied ‘I hope to God if ever I am such a damned fool that I’ll be drowned in the attempt.” A short time afterwards in consequence of her husband talking to her about the truths of the Gospel she consented to go to Pugmire’s house and hear for herself. After attending a few times she told her husband she had a dream in which she saw it was a fearful thing to fall into the hands of the living God, and requested to be baptized. Mrs. Pugmire talked with her reminding her of her harsh expressions, she confessed all, and said ‘I am very sorry, and as my conduct is known to all this neighborhood I do not wish to have my baptism public, but to have it done privately; and I wish no female to accompany me to the water but you’. On the night of her baptism (Nov. 23. 1843) she was conducted to the water by her husband, and Elder Pugmire witnessed by Mrs. Pugmire and James Moor. Previous to this time Elder Pugmire had baptized eight or ten persons in the same place. On arriving at the water they found the Creek had overflowed its banks in consequence of a heavy rain which had fallen that day. Elder Pugmire examined its banks, and concluded he could attend to the ordinance without going into the regular bed of the creek. This was done, but on raising Mrs. Cartwright, and as they were walking out, they both went under the water. It was afterwards discovered, that the water had undermined the bank, and it gave way under their feet; meantime Thomas Cartwright leapt into the creek and seized hold of his wife’s petticoat, but the water carried her off, and left the garment in his hand. James Moor got hold of Elder Pugmire by the hair of his head. Mrs. Pugmire holding Moor’s hand and thus they dragged him out. Moor then ran to the village to give the alarm, on his return he found Cartwright about one hundred yards from where he leapt in [HC 6:161] with his head above water, holding on to the stump of a tree; he said he could not have remained in that situation one minute longer. George Knowlen swam the stream and got him out, but his wife was not found until the day following, when she was found about two hundred yards from where the accident occurred standing upon her feet, with her head above water, the stream having fallen about two feet. On Pugmire reaching home, a Church of England minister had him arrested and dragged from his family the same evening and kept in custody of a Constable until a Coroner’s inquest was held on the body of the deceased. After she was buried, Cartwright was arrested, and both were sent to Chester jail to wait their trial before the Judge of Assize. They were in confinement six weeks and three days before their trial came on. The Judge (Whitehead) remarked to the Jury that baptism was an ordinance of our religion and that it was a mere accident which had occurred, he advised the jurymen to be very careful how they examined the case before them, that it was an ordinance instituted by God. (at that moment the Lord spoke by the voice of thunder which shook the court house) and advised the prisoners to be very careful in the future to select a proper place for the performance of that rite. They were then set free.
During their imprisonment Pugmire had a vision in which he was informed that they would be liberated & he told Cartwright to be of good cheer, for they certainly would be acquitted.” [p. 1850]
Page 1850