History, 1838–1856, volume E-1 [1 July 1843–30 April 1844]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 1855
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<​January 5​> Mayor:— Did Warren Smith or any other policeman give you to understand that I had authorized him to believe there was any difficulty between me and or ?
:— No! He did not think Warren Smith would transcend his official duties towards or , felt at the time and were in danger; <​did not think they were in danger​> if they did not rise up against the authorities.
Did not say he had any instruction— said to ‘you have enemies.’ My impression was that somebody had been to Joseph to make a bad impression on his mind— Warren Smith did mention name, I think. [HC 6:167]
Thirty Policemen— all who were present— sworn;— testified that Genl. Smith had never given them any private instruction concerning the case before the Council.
Warren Smith said asked his opinion who was the Judas. I said from rumor I would suspect — does not believe he mentioned ’ name. My opinion was founded on rumor. Brother said was in a bad situation— was kicking,— and if he did not mind he would go over the board; if he had his property in available means and was away, he would feel better. Have heard it talked of that was not going to stand. did not tell what he was kicking at— I understood a Brutus to mean a treacherous man.
George W Crouse sworn;— Does not recollect any conversation between Warren Smith and at his store relative to the case in question— had a discussion about the duties of policemen.
said it was customary in all cities for policemen to go armed in time of danger.
confirmed ’s observation.
Counselor spoke— told a story of the old Dutch man and the ox.
makes me think of an old Dutchman, who had an ox the <​first​> animal he ever owned in his life, and he broke him to ride, then he filled a sack with rocks and laid it on the ox’s back and got on himself and told his son to hide by <​the​> roadside and when he came along to jump out and holloa boo, as he wanted to know how well his ox was broke, The Son did accordingly; the ox was frightened and throwed <​threw​> the old man off. “Father” said the son “I done <​did​> as you told me”. “Yes” said the old man “but you made too big a boo.”
sworn:— Have received the impression from rumor that , and probably one or two others could not subscribe to all things in the church, and there were some private matters that might make trouble— don’t know of any one’s being in danger. No one told me the police had received any private instruction— Could not tell who he had received these rumors from.
spoke:— said he had no personal feeling against Warren Smith. Some two or three years since he sued brother Warren, and stayed [p. 1855]
January 5 Mayor:— Did Warren Smith or any other policeman give you to understand that I had authorized him to believe there was any difficulty between me and or ?
:— No! He did not think Warren Smith would transcend his official duties towards or , felt at the time and were in danger; did not think they were in danger if they did not rise up against the authorities.
Did not say he had any instruction— said to ‘you have enemies.’ My impression was that somebody had been to Joseph to make a bad impression on his mind— Warren Smith did mention ’ name, I think. [HC 6:167]
Thirty Policemen— all who were present— sworn;— testified that Genl. Smith had never given them any private instruction concerning the case before the Council.
Warren Smith said asked his opinion who was the Judas. I said from rumor I would suspect — does not believe he mentioned ’ name. My opinion was founded on rumor. Brother said was in a bad situation— was kicking,— and if he did not mind he would go over the board; if he had his property in available means and was away, he would feel better. Have heard it talked of that was not going to stand. did not tell what he was kicking at— I understood a Brutus to mean a treacherous man.
George W Crouse sworn;— Does not recollect any conversation between Warren Smith and at his store relative to the case in question— had a discussion about the duties of policemen.
said it was customary in all cities for policemen to go armed in time of danger.
confirmed ’s observation.
Counselor spoke— told a story of the old Dutch man and the ox.
makes me think of an old Dutchman, who had an ox the first animal he ever owned in his life, and he broke him to ride, then he filled a sack with rocks and laid it on the ox’s back and got on himself and told his son to hide by the roadside and when he came along to jump out and holloa boo, as he wanted to know how well his ox was broke, The Son did accordingly; the ox was frightened and threw the old man off. “Father” said the son “I did as you told me”. “Yes” said the old man “but you made too big a boo.”
sworn:— Have received the impression from rumor that , and probably one or two others could not subscribe to all things in the church, and there were some private matters that might make trouble— don’t know of any one’s being in danger. No one told me the police had received any private instruction— Could not tell who he had received these rumors from.
spoke:— said he had no personal feeling against Warren Smith. Some two or three years since he sued brother Warren, and stayed [p. 1855]
Page 1855