History, 1838–1856, volume E-1 [1 July 1843–30 April 1844]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 1891
image
<​February 15​> of either of the prominent candidates, , or , obtaining the Presidential chair, we should not be placed in any better situation. In speaking of his politics are diametrically opposed to ours; he inclines strongly to the old school of federalists, and as a matter of course, would not favor our cause, neither could we conscientiously vote for him. And we have yet stronger objections to , on other grounds. He has sung the old song of congress— ‘congress has no power to redress your grievances.’ But did the matter rest here it would not be so bad. He was in the Presidential chair at the time of our former difficulties. We appealed to him on that occasion, but we appealed in vain, and his sentiments are yet unchanged. But all these things are tolerable in comparison to what we have yet to state. We have been informed from a respectable source, that there is an understanding between , of ; and , and a conditional compact entered into, that if will use his influence to get elected, that when elected, shall use his executive influence to wipe away the stain from , by a further persecution of the Mormons, and wreaking out vengeance on their heads either by extermination, or by some other summary process. We could scarcely credit the statement, and we hope yet for the sake of humanity, that the suggestion is false; but we have too good reason to believe that we are correctly informed.
If then this is the case can we conscientiously vote for a man of this description, and put the weapons into his hands to cut our throat with? we cannot: and however much we might wish to sustain the democratic nomination we cannot— we will not vote for . Our interests, our property, our lives and the lives of our families are too dear to us to be sacrificed at the shrine of party-spirit, and to gratify party feelings. We have been sold once in the State of , and our liberties bartered away by political demagogues through executive intrigue, and we wish not to be betrayed again by and .
Under the circumstances the question again arises, who shall we support? General Joseph Smith. A man of sterling worth and integrity and of enlarged views; a man who has raised himself from [HC 6:216] the humblest walks in life to stand at the head of a large, intelligent, respectable, and increasing society, that has spread not only in this land, but in distant nations; a man whose talents and genius, are of an exalted nature, and whose experience has rendered him every way adequate to the onerous duty. Honorable, fearless, and energetic; he would administer justice with an impartial hand, and magnify, and dignify the office of chief magistrate of this land; and we feel assured that there is not a man in the more competent for the task.
One great reason that we have for pursuing our present course is, that at every election we have been made a political target for the filthy demagogues in the country to shoot their loathsome arrows at. And every story has been put into requisition to blast our fame, from the old fabrication of “walk on the water” down to “the murder of .” The journals have [p. 1891]
February 15 of either of the prominent candidates, , or , obtaining the Presidential chair, we should not be placed in any better situation. In speaking of his politics are diametrically opposed to ours; he inclines strongly to the old school of federalists, and as a matter of course, would not favor our cause, neither could we conscientiously vote for him. And we have yet stronger objections to , on other grounds. He has sung the old song of congress— ‘congress has no power to redress your grievances.’ But did the matter rest here it would not be so bad. He was in the Presidential chair at the time of our former difficulties. We appealed to him on that occasion, but we appealed in vain, and his sentiments are yet unchanged. But all these things are tolerable in comparison to what we have yet to state. We have been informed from a respectable source, that there is an understanding between , of ; and , and a conditional compact entered into, that if will use his influence to get elected, that when elected, shall use his executive influence to wipe away the stain from , by a further persecution of the Mormons, and wreaking out vengeance on their heads either by extermination, or by some other summary process. We could scarcely credit the statement, and we hope yet for the sake of humanity, that the suggestion is false; but we have too good reason to believe that we are correctly informed.
If then this is the case can we conscientiously vote for a man of this description, and put the weapons into his hands to cut our throat with? we cannot: and however much we might wish to sustain the democratic nomination we cannot— we will not vote for . Our interests, our property, our lives and the lives of our families are too dear to us to be sacrificed at the shrine of party-spirit, and to gratify party feelings. We have been sold once in the State of , and our liberties bartered away by political demagogues through executive intrigue, and we wish not to be betrayed again by and .
Under the circumstances the question again arises, who shall we support? General Joseph Smith. A man of sterling worth and integrity and of enlarged views; a man who has raised himself from [HC 6:216] the humblest walks in life to stand at the head of a large, intelligent, respectable, and increasing society, that has spread not only in this land, but in distant nations; a man whose talents and genius, are of an exalted nature, and whose experience has rendered him every way adequate to the onerous duty. Honorable, fearless, and energetic; he would administer justice with an impartial hand, and magnify, and dignify the office of chief magistrate of this land; and we feel assured that there is not a man in the more competent for the task.
One great reason that we have for pursuing our present course is, that at every election we have been made a political target for the filthy demagogues in the country to shoot their loathsome arrows at. And every story has been put into requisition to blast our fame, from the old fabrication of “walk on the water” down to “the murder of .” The journals have [p. 1891]
Page 1891