History, 1838–1856, volume E-1 [1 July 1843–30 April 1844]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 1903
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<​March 4​> “I have recently mailed to you, Gen. Smith’s views of the Powers and Policy of the Government of the , which were drawn forth in consequence of his friends selecting him as a candidate for the next Presidency, which he very reluctantly acquiesced in,— and it seems, would not, only to support a favorite maxim, ‘the people must govern,’ but having once been prevailed upon to suffer his name to go abroad, as a Candidate, it is desirable to him of course, as to every patriot, that those who have brought him forward should use all honorable means to sustain him in the canvass, and if I had not felt disposed to uphold him before the people I never would have been the first to urge his nomination; and during the short space, since his name has been published, his friends have been astonished at the flood of influence; that is rolling through the Western States in his favor, and in many instances where we might have least expected it.
“I need not assert what the wisest of the wise admit without argument that Gen. Smith is the greatest statesman of the 19th. Century; then why should not the nation secure to them selves his superior talents, that they may rise higher and higher in the estimation of the crowns of the nations, and exalt themselves through his wisdom?
“Your friends here, consider your letter about the Governorship of just like ‘every man in your quarter, mere sport,’ child’s, sport for who would stoop to the play of a single state when the whole nation was on the board! a cheaper game? Gen. Smith says if he must be president, must be vice President,— To this his friends are agreed, agreed in everything, and in this consists our power consequently your name will [HC 6:231] appear in our next paper as our candidate for Vice President of the . You will receive our undivided support, and we expect the same in return for Gen. Smith for the Presidency, and we will go it with the rush of a whirlwind so peaceful, so gentle, that it will not be felt by the nation till the battle’s won * <​*Dear , if glory, honor, force and power in righteous principles are desired by you, now is your time, you are safe in following the council of that man who holds communion with heaven.— and I assure you if you act well your part, Victory’s the prize.​> look well to ‘Gen. Smiths views,’ and his letter to and comprehend him fully. say to the Herald, now is the time for your exaltation, raise your standard high sound your trumpet long and loud support Gen. Smith and myself at the next election— and when we are exalted you shall not be forgotten. Hold forth no false shadows to honest men, yet though there is but one best piece to the fatted calf, yet there are many good slices, therefore you will not forget the “Advertizer” “Niles Register” “Globe” &c. &c. Get up an Electoral ticket , , , and any state within your reach.— Open your mouth wide, and God shall fill it. Cut your quill and the ink shall flow freely,— commence at your own and stay not, only for electioneering purposes till by some— popular route you reach — and if you preach Mormonism it will help you, at every stage, tavern, Boat and Company, expose the wickedness of Martinism, in saying if ‘he is elected President he will annihilate the Mormons,’ and proclaim the sycophancy of the candidates generally,— and uphold Joseph against every aspersion and you shall triumph gloriously [p. 1903]
March 4 “I have recently mailed to you, Gen. Smith’s views of the Powers and Policy of the Government of the , which were drawn forth in consequence of his friends selecting him as a candidate for the next Presidency, which he very reluctantly acquiesced in,— and it seems, would not, only to support a favorite maxim, ‘the people must govern,’ but having once been prevailed upon to suffer his name to go abroad, as a Candidate, it is desirable to him of course, as to every patriot, that those who have brought him forward should use all honorable means to sustain him in the canvass, and if I had not felt disposed to uphold him before the people I never would have been the first to urge his nomination; and during the short space, since his name has been published, his friends have been astonished at the flood of influence; that is rolling through the Western States in his favor, and in many instances where we might have least expected it.
“I need not assert what the wisest of the wise admit without argument that Gen. Smith is the greatest statesman of the 19th. Century; then why should not the nation secure to them selves his superior talents, that they may rise higher and higher in the estimation of the crowns of the nations, and exalt themselves through his wisdom?
“Your friends here, consider your letter about the Governorship of just like ‘every man in your quarter, mere sport,’ child’s, sport for who would stoop to the play of a single state when the whole nation was on the board! a cheaper game? Gen. Smith says if he must be president, must be vice President,— To this his friends are agreed, agreed in everything, and in this consists our power consequently your name will [HC 6:231] appear in our next paper as our candidate for Vice President of the . You will receive our undivided support, and we expect the same in return for Gen. Smith for the Presidency, and we will go it with the rush of a whirlwind so peaceful, so gentle, that it will not be felt by the nation till the battle’s won * *Dear , if glory, honor, force and power in righteous principles are desired by you, now is your time, you are safe in following the council of that man who holds communion with heaven.— and I assure you if you act well your part, Victory’s the prize. look well to ‘Gen. Smiths views,’ and his letter to and comprehend him fully. say to the Herald, now is the time for your exaltation, raise your standard high sound your trumpet long and loud support Gen. Smith and myself at the next election— and when we are exalted you shall not be forgotten. Hold forth no false shadows to honest men, yet though there is but one best piece to the fatted calf, yet there are many good slices, therefore you will not forget the “Advertizer” “Niles Register” “Globe” &c. &c. Get up an Electoral ticket , , , and any state within your reach.— Open your mouth wide, and God shall fill it. Cut your quill and the ink shall flow freely,— commence at your own and stay not, only for electioneering purposes till by some— popular route you reach — and if you preach Mormonism it will help you, at every stage, tavern, Boat and Company, expose the wickedness of Martinism, in saying if ‘he is elected President he will annihilate the Mormons,’ and proclaim the sycophancy of the candidates generally,— and uphold Joseph against every aspersion and you shall triumph gloriously [p. 1903]
Page 1903