History, 1838–1856, volume E-1 [1 July 1843–30 April 1844]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 1908
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<​March 7​> been told you or not. I apologize for not coming sooner. I have had so much on my mind since I saw you that I hardly know where to begin or what to say; but one of the grand objects I had in view in calling this meeting was, to make a few remarks relative to the laws and ordinances of the , and the building of the . The reason I want to speak of the city ordinances is, that the officers have difficulty in administering them. We are republicans, and wish to have the people rule; but they must rule in righteousness. Some would complain with what God himself would do. The laws or ordinances are enacted by the City Council on petition of the people, and they can all be repealed if they wish it and petition accordingly. At all events the people ought not to complain of the officers, but if they are not satisfied, they should complain to the law makers by petition. I am instructed by the City Council to tell this people, that if there is any law passed by us which you dislike, we will repeal it; for we are your servants. Those who complain of our rights and charters are wicked and corrupt, and the Devil is in them.
The reason I called up this subject is,— we have a <​gang of​> simple—— fellows here who do not know where their elbows or heads are; if you preach virtue to them, they will oppose that; or if you preach a Methodist God to them, they will oppose that; and the same if you preach anything else; and if there is any case tried by the authorities of they want it appealed to to the circuit Court. Mr. ’s case had to go to ; our lawyers will appeal anything to the Circuit Court. [HC 6:237] I want the people to speak out, and say whether such men should be tolerated and supported in our midst; and I want to know if the citizens will sustain me when my hands are raised to heaven for and in behalf of the people. From this time I design to bring such characters who act against the interests of the , before a Committee of the whole, and I will have the voice of the people, which is republican, and is likely to be the voice of God; and as long as I have a tongue to speak, I will expose the iniquity of the lawyers and wicked men. I fear not their boiling over, nor the boiling over of hell— their thunders nor the lightning of their forked tongues. If these things cannot be put a stop to, I will give such men into the hands of the mob; the hands of the officers of the city falter and are palsied by their conduct.
There is another person I will speak about— he is a Mormon— a certain man who lived here before we came here— the two first letters of his name are ; when a man is baptized and becomes a member of the church, I have a right to talk about him, and reprove him in public or private <​whenever it is necessary or he deserves it​>. When the passed an ordinance to collect wharfage from steamboats, he goes and tells the Captains of the steamboats that he owned the landing, and that [p. 1908]
March 7 been told you or not. I apologize for not coming sooner. I have had so much on my mind since I saw you that I hardly know where to begin or what to say; but one of the grand objects I had in view in calling this meeting was, to make a few remarks relative to the laws and ordinances of the , and the building of the . The reason I want to speak of the city ordinances is, that the officers have difficulty in administering them. We are republicans, and wish to have the people rule; but they must rule in righteousness. Some would complain with what God himself would do. The laws or ordinances are enacted by the City Council on petition of the people, and they can all be repealed if they wish it and petition accordingly. At all events the people ought not to complain of the officers, but if they are not satisfied, they should complain to the law makers by petition. I am instructed by the City Council to tell this people, that if there is any law passed by us which you dislike, we will repeal it; for we are your servants. Those who complain of our rights and charters are wicked and corrupt, and the Devil is in them.
The reason I called up this subject is,— we have a gang of simple—— fellows here who do not know where their elbows or heads are; if you preach virtue to them, they will oppose that; or if you preach a Methodist God to them, they will oppose that; and the same if you preach anything else; and if there is any case tried by the authorities of they want it appealed to to the circuit Court. Mr. ’s case had to go to ; our lawyers will appeal anything to the Circuit Court. [HC 6:237] I want the people to speak out, and say whether such men should be tolerated and supported in our midst; and I want to know if the citizens will sustain me when my hands are raised to heaven for and in behalf of the people. From this time I design to bring such characters who act against the interests of the , before a Committee of the whole, and I will have the voice of the people, which is republican, and is likely to be the voice of God; and as long as I have a tongue to speak, I will expose the iniquity of the lawyers and wicked men. I fear not their boiling over, nor the boiling over of hell— their thunders nor the lightning of their forked tongues. If these things cannot be put a stop to, I will give such men into the hands of the mob; the hands of the officers of the city falter and are palsied by their conduct.
There is another person I will speak about— he is a Mormon— a certain man who lived here before we came here— the two first letters of his name are ; when a man is baptized and becomes a member of the church, I have a right to talk about him, and reprove him in public or private whenever it is necessary or he deserves it. When the passed an ordinance to collect wharfage from steamboats, he goes and tells the Captains of the steamboats that he owned the landing, and that [p. 1908]
Page 1908