History, 1838–1856, volume E-1 [1 July 1843–30 April 1844]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 1932
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<​March 15​>
“Believing that our patrons and friends are pleased to hear of our prosperity, we feel happy in apprising them of the same, through the columns of our paper.
Owing to the scarcity of provision, and the pressure in the money market during the past winter, commercial business has been somewhat dull; consequently those who were not previously prepared, have been obliged to employ the principle portion of their time in obtaining the necessary means for the sustenance of their families; therefore little improvement has been made. But old boreas is now on his receding march, and spring has commenced its return with all its pleasantness. [HC 6:265]
Navigation is open, and steam boats are almost continually plying up and down our majestic ; they have already brought several families of emigrants to this place, who have cordially joined with their friends and brethren in the great work of the upbuilding of Zion, and the rolling forth of the kingdom of God.
The work of improvement is now actively begun and in every direction may be heard the sound of the Mason’s trowel, the carpenter’s hammer, the teamster’s voice; or in other words, the hum of industry, and the voice of merriment. Indeed, to judge from the present appearance, a greater amount of improvement will be done the ensuing summer, than in the preceding one. Almost every stranger that enters our , is excited with astonishment, that so much has been done in so short a time; but we flatter ourself, from the known industry, perseverance and diligence of the Saints, that by the return of another winter, so much more will be accomplished, that his astonishment will be increased to wonder and admiration.
Quite extensive preparations are being made by the farmers in this vicinity, for the cultivation of land; and should the season prove favorable, we doubt not that nearly, if not a sufficient amount of produce will be raised to supply the wants of the and adjacent country.
We are also pleased that we can inform our friends abroad, that the Saints here of late, have taken hold of the work on the with a zeal and energy that in no small degree excites our admiration. Their united efforts certainly speaks to us, that it is their determination that this spacious edifice shall be enclosed, if not finished, this season. And a word we would say to the saints abroad, which is, that the is being built in compliance with a special commandment of God, not to a few individuals but to all: therefore we sincerely hope you will contribute of your means as liberally, as your circumstances will allow, that the burden of the work may not rest upon a few, but proportionately upon all. Where is the true hearted saint that does not with joy and delight, contemplate the endowment of the servants of God, and the blessings he has promised his people on condition they speedily build the ? Certainly you cannot reasonably expect to enjoy these blessings, if you refuse to contribute your share towards its erection. It is a thing of importance, and much depends upon its accomplishment: therefore [p. 1932]
March 15
“Believing that our patrons and friends are pleased to hear of our prosperity, we feel happy in apprising them of the same, through the columns of our paper.
Owing to the scarcity of provision, and the pressure in the money market during the past winter, commercial business has been somewhat dull; consequently those who were not previously prepared, have been obliged to employ the principle portion of their time in obtaining the necessary means for the sustenance of their families; therefore little improvement has been made. But old boreas is now on his receding march, and spring has commenced its return with all its pleasantness. [HC 6:265]
Navigation is open, and steam boats are almost continually plying up and down our majestic ; they have already brought several families of emigrants to this place, who have cordially joined with their friends and brethren in the great work of the upbuilding of Zion, and the rolling forth of the kingdom of God.
The work of improvement is now actively begun and in every direction may be heard the sound of the Mason’s trowel, the carpenter’s hammer, the teamster’s voice; or in other words, the hum of industry, and the voice of merriment. Indeed, to judge from the present appearance, a greater amount of improvement will be done the ensuing summer, than in the preceding one. Almost every stranger that enters our , is excited with astonishment, that so much has been done in so short a time; but we flatter ourself, from the known industry, perseverance and diligence of the Saints, that by the return of another winter, so much more will be accomplished, that his astonishment will be increased to wonder and admiration.
Quite extensive preparations are being made by the farmers in this vicinity, for the cultivation of land; and should the season prove favorable, we doubt not that nearly, if not a sufficient amount of produce will be raised to supply the wants of the and adjacent country.
We are also pleased that we can inform our friends abroad, that the Saints here of late, have taken hold of the work on the with a zeal and energy that in no small degree excites our admiration. Their united efforts certainly speak to us, that it is their determination that this spacious edifice shall be enclosed, if not finished, this season. And a word we would say to the saints abroad, which is, that the is being built in compliance with a special commandment of God, not to a few individuals but to all: therefore we sincerely hope you will contribute of your means as liberally, as your circumstances will allow, that the burden of the work may not rest upon a few, but proportionately upon all. Where is the true hearted saint that does not with joy and delight, contemplate the endowment of the servants of God, and the blessings he has promised his people on condition they speedily build the ? Certainly you cannot reasonably expect to enjoy these blessings, if you refuse to contribute your share towards its erection. It is a thing of importance, and much depends upon its accomplishment: therefore [p. 1932]
Page 1932