History, 1838–1856, volume E-1 [1 July 1843–30 April 1844]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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has been built up at the expense and ruin of another, and one man has been made at the expense of another; and yet these great men were called honorable for their inglorious deeds of rapine. They have slain their thousands, and caused the orphans to weep and the widows to mourn. Men did these things because they could do it— because they had power to desolate nations and spread terror and desolation. They have made themselves immortal as great men. The patriots of this country had indeed a laudable object in view— a plausible excuse for the course they took. They stood up in defence of their rights, liberty, and freedom; but where are now those principles of freedom? Where are the laws that protect all men in their religious opinions? Where the laws that say, “a man shall worship God according to the dictates of his own conscience”? What say ye, ye saints, ye who are exiles in the land of liberty? How came you here? Can you in this land of equal rights return in safety to your possessions in ? No!— You are exiles from thence, and there is no power, no voice, no arm to redress your grievances. Is this the gracious boon for which your fathers fought, and struggled, and died? Shades of the venerable dead, could you but gaze upon this scene, and witness tens of thousands of Americans in exile on Columbia’s soil, if pity could touch your bosoms, how would you mourn for the oppressed? if indignation, how would you curse the heartless wretches that have so desecrated and polluted the temple of liberty? “How has the gold become dim, and the fine gold, how has it changed?” Let it not be told among the heathen monarchs of Europe, lest they laugh and say “ha! ha! so would we have it.” Ye saints, never let it go abroad that ye are exiles in the land of liberty, lest ye disgrace your republic in the eyes of the nations of the earth; but tell it to those who robbed and plundered, and refused to give you your rights; tell your rulers that all their deeds of fame are tarnished, and their glory is departed. Are we now indeed in a land of liberty— of freedom— of equal rights? Would to God I could answer yes; but no! no!! I cannot. They have robbed us, we are stripped of our possessions, many of our friends are slain, and our government says “your cause is just, but we an do nothing for you”. Hear it, ye great men, we are here in exile! Here are thousands of men in bondage in a land of liberty— of freedom!! If ye have any patriotism left, shake off your fetters, and come and proclaim us free, and give us our rights. I speak of this government as being one of the best <​of​> governments, as one of the greatest and purest; and yet, what a melancholy picture. O ye venerable fathers who fought for your liberty, blush for your children, and mourn, mourn over your country’s shame. We are now talking about a government which sets herself up as a pattern for the nations of the earth, and yet, O what a picture. If this is the best, the most patriotic, the most free, what is the situation of the rest? Here we speak with national pride of a Washington, a LaFayette, a [James] Monroe, and a Jefferson, who fought for their liberties, and achieved one of the greatest victories ever won; and scarcely has one generation passed away before fifteen thousand citizens petition government for redress of their wrongs, and they turn a deaf ear to their cry. Let us compare this with the Church of Christ; fourteen years ago a few men assembled in a log cabin; they saw the visions of heaven, and gazed upon the eternal world; they looked through the rent vista of futurity, and behold the glories of eternity; they were planting those principles which were concocted in the bosom of Jehovah; they were laying a foundation for the salvation of the world; and those principles which they then planted have not yet begun to dwindle, but the fire still burns in their bones; the principles are planted in different nations, and are wafted on every breeze. When I gaze upon this [p. 2 [addenda]]
has been built up at the expense and ruin of another, and one man has been made at the expense of another; and yet these great men were called honorable for their inglorious deeds of rapine. They have slain their thousands, and caused the orphans to weep and the widows to mourn. Men did these things because they could do it— because they had power to desolate nations and spread terror and desolation. They have made themselves immortal as great men. The patriots of this country had indeed a laudable object in view— a plausible excuse for the course they took. They stood up in defence of their rights, liberty, and freedom; but where are now those principles of freedom? Where are the laws that protect all men in their religious opinions? Where the laws that say, “a man shall worship God according to the dictates of his own conscience”? What say ye, ye saints, ye who are exiles in the land of liberty? How came you here? Can you in this land of equal rights return in safety to your possessions in ? No!— You are exiles from thence, and there is no power, no voice, no arm to redress your grievances. Is this the gracious boon for which your fathers fought, and struggled, and died? Shades of the venerable dead, could you but gaze upon this scene, and witness tens of thousands of Americans in exile on Columbia’s soil, if pity could touch your bosoms, how would you mourn for the oppressed? if indignation, how would you curse the heartless wretches that have so desecrated and polluted the temple of liberty? “How has the gold become dim, and the fine gold, how has it changed?” Let it not be told among the heathen monarchs of Europe, lest they laugh and say “ha! ha! so would we have it.” Ye saints, never let it go abroad that ye are exiles in the land of liberty, lest ye disgrace your republic in the eyes of the nations of the earth; but tell it to those who robbed and plundered, and refused to give you your rights; tell your rulers that all their deeds of fame are tarnished, and their glory is departed. Are we now indeed in a land of liberty— of freedom— of equal rights? Would to God I could answer yes; but no! no!! I cannot. They have robbed us, we are stripped of our possessions, many of our friends are slain, and our government says “your cause is just, but we an do nothing for you”. Hear it, ye great men, we are here in exile! Here are thousands of men in bondage in a land of liberty— of freedom!! If ye have any patriotism left, shake off your fetters, and come and proclaim us free, and give us our rights. I speak of this government as being one of the best of governments, as one of the greatest and purest; and yet, what a melancholy picture. O ye venerable fathers who fought for your liberty, blush for your children, and mourn, mourn over your country’s shame. We are now talking about a government which sets herself up as a pattern for the nations of the earth, and yet, O what a picture. If this is the best, the most patriotic, the most free, what is the situation of the rest? Here we speak with national pride of a Washington, a LaFayette, a James Monroe, and a Jefferson, who fought for their liberties, and achieved one of the greatest victories ever won; and scarcely has one generation passed away before fifteen thousand citizens petition government for redress of their wrongs, and they turn a deaf ear to their cry. Let us compare this with the Church of Christ; fourteen years ago a few men assembled in a log cabin; they saw the visions of heaven, and gazed upon the eternal world; they looked through the rent vista of futurity, and behold the glories of eternity; they were planting those principles which were concocted in the bosom of Jehovah; they were laying a foundation for the salvation of the world; and those principles which they then planted have not yet begun to dwindle, but the fire still burns in their bones; the principles are planted in different nations, and are wafted on every breeze. When I gaze upon this [p. 2 [addenda]]
Page 2 [addenda]