History, 1838–1856, volume E-1 [1 July 1843–30 April 1844]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 1699
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<​August 26​> to me swearing mad— Went on until 3 o’Clock then baited our horses and prepared; for a shower that was <​apparently​> nigh at hand, we went until sundown then pitched our tent in the grass and such rain and thunder and lightning I never before witnessed,— lay all night in the rain, our tent blowed to the four winds <​blew over​>. Friday 29 July we dried our things by the fire, and then went on about 25 miles, came to <​a village of​> the Pottawatamie’s about sunset found no body at home, at his <​went into the​> house <​of my guide​> his wife was dead and his son and wife were gone to the North on a Buffalo hunt,— we made a fire and got something to eat: late in the night there came four Indians and one old squaw, they brought some jerked venison and some half boiled corn. Saturday morning 30th. July we were sent for to the chief’s house we went the Indians, sqaws and children came from every quarter to see the man that had come with Neotanah, breakfast was ready for us <​as​> soon as we came in, this was the first time that I ever eat at a wigwam, amongst little and great, when the victuals relished as it did at this time, but this is easily accounted for Hunger will make any thing that is eatable taste good. Staid all day at the Chief’s house, my rifle seemed to be the great wonder amongst all, Indians and sqaws, it went the rounds from one to another, as if it had been one of the seven wonders of the world. This Indian town stands on the creek called the Pottawatamie Tour-se-paa; this creek is from three to eight rods wide and deep, and often overflows its banks— its length is 60 miles, <​and it​> empties into the 30 miles from Pottawatamie Town. Sunday 31st. Nothing this day transpired worth mentioning. About 3 o’Clock p.m. a delegate from the Pottawamie tribe returned from Iowa river, where he met in Council with 2 of the Sioux and 1 Winnebago. (he said the distance from the Pottawatamies to is 500 miles) Monday 1st. August 1843 this day I spent in looking up the creek for a mill seat and found one, and two beds of iron ore— Tuesday 2nd. This morning the chief of the warriors brought me two catfish and left them in the Wika up where I staid, I cooked half of one of them and it eat very good,— the Indians all are very kind to me, more so than I could expect. This tribe is some what scattered [HC 5:543] about by <​thro’​> the Timber <​up​> and <​down​> by the creek, but the main village or Town, stands on an eminence that overlooks the whole of the rest of the Indian habitations. It appears to be a healthy habitation, the water is good, and the climate wholesome, some considerable timber, though no very good sawing timber except basswood, Black Walnut, some cotton<​wood​>. This tribe have been here for six years— from Rock River. The Pottawatamies this side of the , they say, will number 2,000 men women and children. 34 miles from this Pottawatamie Town to the Council bluffs, 200 miles South lies Fort Leavenworth, and about the same distance South East lies — 100 miles North is a buffalo country where the Pottawatamies hunt and catch Buffalo. Wednesday <​August​> 3d. of August. Council met at 2 o’Clock: they own five millions of acres of land— last annuities the number <​was​> fifteen hundred and fifty two souls Council arose at sunset, when the decision was made that Neotanah should conduct me back again to the Agency in on the nearest and most convenient route; the head chief was to conduct me home, but in council a messenger arrived, <​and​> brought news that the superintendant of the Annuities had arrived at the garrison Leavensworth and the middle of August he would visit the chiefs at Council bluffs [p. 1699]
August 26 to me swearing mad— Went on until 3 o’Clock then baited our horses and prepared; for a shower that was apparently nigh at hand, we went until sundown then pitched our tent in the grass and such rain and thunder and lightning I never before witnessed,— lay all night in the rain, our tent blew over. Friday 29 July we dried our things by the fire, and then went on about 25 miles, came to a village of the Pottawatamie’s about sunset found no body at home, went into the house of my guide his wife was dead and his son and wife were gone to the North on a Buffalo hunt,— we made a fire and got something to eat: late in the night there came four Indians and one old squaw, they brought some jerked venison and some half boiled corn. Saturday morning 30th. July we were sent for to the chief’s house we went the Indians, sqaws and children came from every quarter to see the man that had come with Neotanah, breakfast was ready for us as soon as we came in, this was the first time that I ever eat at a wigwam, amongst little and great, when the victuals relished as it did at this time, but this is easily accounted for Hunger will make any thing that is eatable taste good. Staid all day at the Chief’s house, my rifle seemed to be the great wonder amongst all, Indians and sqaws, it went the rounds from one to another, as if it had been one of the seven wonders of the world. This Indian town stands on the creek called the Pottawatamie Tour-se-paa; this creek is from three to eight rods wide and deep, and often overflows its banks— its length is 60 miles, and it empties into the 30 miles from Pottawatamie Town. Sunday 31st. Nothing this day transpired worth mentioning. About 3 o’Clock p.m. a delegate from the Pottawamie tribe returned from Iowa river, where he met in Council with 2 of the Sioux and 1 Winnebago. (he said the distance from the Pottawatamies to is 500 miles) Monday 1st. August 1843 this day I spent in looking up the creek for a mill seat and found one, and two beds of iron ore— Tuesday 2nd. This morning the chief of the warriors brought me two catfish and left them in the Wika up where I staid, I cooked half of one of them and it eat very good,— the Indians all are very kind to me, more so than I could expect. This tribe is some what scattered [HC 5:543] thro’ the Timber up and down the creek, but the main village or Town, stands on an eminence that overlooks the whole of the rest of the Indian habitations. It appears to be a healthy habitation, the water is good, and the climate wholesome, some considerable timber, though no very good sawing timber except basswood, Black Walnut, some cottonwood. This tribe have been here for six years— from Rock River. The Pottawatamies this side of the , they say, will number 2,000 men women and children. 34 miles from this Pottawatamie Town to the Council bluffs, 200 miles South lies Fort Leavenworth, and about the same distance South East lies — 100 miles North is a buffalo country where the Pottawatamies hunt and catch Buffalo. Wednesday August 3d. . Council met at 2 o’Clock: they own five millions of acres of land— last annuities the number was fifteen hundred and fifty two souls Council arose at sunset, when the decision was made that Neotanah should conduct me back again to the Agency in on the nearest and most convenient route; the head chief was to conduct me home, but in council a messenger arrived, and brought news that the superintendant of the Annuities had arrived at the garrison Leavensworth and the middle of August he would visit the chiefs at Council bluffs [p. 1699]
Page 1699