History, 1838–1856, volume E-1 [1 July 1843–30 April 1844]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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<​August 26​> some few who were employed in cooking for the rest. Here I will notice, that the most profound silence and good order that I ever saw in any congregation what ever, small or great, was observed. All that is wanting to make them the happiest people in the world is the Gospel, a perfect knowledge of it and to feel its power, their sectarian creeds and ceremonies would go to the Moles and bats soon. Although they labor with as much energy of body and mind and have as much zeal as the Shaking quakers, yet it is heathen worship like all other sectarian Societies. Their idea of the Supreme being is much more consistent than <​many of​> the holy enlightened Methodists <​Sectarians​>.— For the Indians believe in the great Shamingto as having body and parts like unto a man [blank].
Thursday 18th. This morning we started for , a long and tedious journey to perform lay before us. we had no compass. to steer our course by only by the sun as it rose <​rising​> in the morning, to tell us <​was our principal guide​>. Our course was due east, this course we intended to follow as near as we could. The place we left, (Belle vue) or Mosquito creek— is in the same latitude of therefore on our return our course must be East. And this direction we followed until we came to the Keosoqua on the Desmoines river. We travelled fifteen miles <​unto​> an other another Indian village, staid all night and in the morning a council was called, and we staid all day. Friday 19th. At this village we got some provisions cooked and the chief’s brother was sent as a delegate from this band. Our company now consisted of four Indians, one squaw, one Interpreter, and myself, seven in number. The Interpreter was a white man half English, and half French, formerly from , and since the last war has lived with the Pottawatamies— married a squaw, sister to the chief, where we now are. We came to the conclusion to stay all day on Friday, because two of our horses went back to where we first started. Saturday 20th. of August, left this village at 10 o’Clock traveled all day until dark, encamped on the Battle ground where the Sioux and Potawatamies and sixteen of the Oneidas fought. I took up [HC 5:548] one of their blankets to ride on. We started the next morning as soon as it was light enough to see to follow the trail.
Sunday 21st Came to the Naama river or creek at 12 o’Clock, stopped and took dinner on a high bank, <​on​> this stream on either side is a quantity of timber, where we crossed is a beautiful Mill seat &c.— Travelled until dark and encamped in the weeds, all night— Monday 22 we started at day break, went until 12 o’Clock, stopped on the East bank of <​White Breast Creek​> and took dinner, here we found plenty of Red Plums, though not fully ripe, but my comrades dined heartily upon them; this was a good hit for me, when we came to eat dinner they could eat but little, by this means I made out to get nearly enough to satisfy hunger, for I had eat nothing since the night before— we passed on until we came to English creek staid all night. Tuesday 23d. started about sunrise without breakfast, travelled until 2 o’Clock crossed the Desmoines river at Eddyville; there I bought a loaf of Wheat bread, a loaf of sweet cake and an apple pie, and went up on the side hill to the Indian Spring and there [p. 1703]
August 26 some few who were employed in cooking for the rest. Here I will notice, that the most profound silence and good order that I ever saw in any congregation what ever, small or great, was observed. All that is wanting to make them the happiest people in the world is the Gospel, a perfect knowledge of it and to feel its power, their sectarian creeds and ceremonies would go to the Moles and bats soon. Although they labor with as much energy of body and mind and have as much zeal as the Shaking quakers, yet it is heathen worship like all other sectarian Societies. Their idea of the Supreme being is much more consistent than many of the holy enlightened Sectarians.— For the Indians believe in the great Shamingto as having body and parts like unto a man [blank].
Thursday 18th. This morning we started for , a long and tedious journey to perform lay before us. we had no compass. to steer our course by the sun rising in the morning, was our principal guide. Our course was due east, this course we intended to follow as near as we could. The place we left, (Belle vue) or Mosquito creek— is in the same latitude of therefore on our return our course must be East. And this direction we followed until we came to the Keosoqua on the Desmoines river. We travelled fifteen miles unto another Indian village, staid all night and in the morning a council was called, and we staid all day. Friday 19th. At this village we got some provisions cooked and the chief’s brother was sent as a delegate from this band. Our company now consisted of four Indians, one squaw, one Interpreter, and myself, seven in number. The Interpreter was a white man half English, and half French, formerly from , and since the last war has lived with the Pottawatamies— married a squaw, sister to the chief, where we now are. We came to the conclusion to stay all day on Friday, because two of our horses went back to where we first started. Saturday 20th. of August, left this village at 10 o’Clock traveled all day until dark, encamped on the Battle ground where the Sioux and Potawatamies and sixteen of the Oneidas fought. I took up [HC 5:548] one of their blankets to ride on. We started the next morning as soon as it was light enough to see to follow the trail.
Sunday 21st Came to the Naama river or creek at 12 o’Clock, stopped and took dinner on a high bank, on this stream on either side is a quantity of timber, where we crossed is a beautiful Mill seat &c.— Travelled until dark and encamped in the weeds, all night— Monday 22 we started at day break, went until 12 o’Clock, stopped on the East bank of White Breast Creek and took dinner, here we found plenty of Red Plums, though not fully ripe, but my comrades dined heartily upon them; this was a good hit for me, when we came to eat dinner they could eat but little, by this means I made out to get nearly enough to satisfy hunger, for I had eat nothing since the night before— we passed on until we came to English creek staid all night. Tuesday 23d. started about sunrise without breakfast, travelled until 2 o’Clock crossed the Desmoines river at Eddyville; there I bought a loaf of Wheat bread, a loaf of sweet cake and an apple pie, and went up on the side hill to the Indian Spring and there [p. 1703]
Page 1703