History, 1838–1856, volume F-1 [1 May 1844–8 August 1844]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 110
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<​June 17​> should come to to attack it unlawfully, and by mob force, a little annoyance upon the rear with some bold fellows would be a very good thing to weaken the ranks of an enemy. It is impossible to give you correct information what to do beforehand, but act according to the emergency of the case; but never give up your arms, but die first. The brethren will give you information of the conversation between us. We have sent to the , and are about to send again; and we want you to send affidavits and demand the attention of the , and request protection at his hand in common with the rest of us, that by our continual wearying, we may get him to come in and investigate the whole matter.
“I now conclude with my best wishes, and must refer you to the brethren for further information.
Joseph Smith, Mayor of the City of , and Lieutenant General of the Nauvoo Legion.”
My brother wrote the following letter to Prest. :—
“City of , June 17th, 1844.
“Dear Brother ,
“There has been for several days a great excitement among the inhabitants in the adjoining counties. Mass meetings are held upon mass meeting, drawing up resolutions to utterly exterminate the saints. The excitement has been gotten up by the Laws, Fosters, and the Higbees; and they themselves have left the , and are engaged in the mob. They have sent their runners into the State of to excite them to murder and bloodshed, and the report is that a great many hun[HC 6:486]dreds of them will come over to take an active part in murdering the saints. The excitement is very great indeed. It is thought best by myself and others for you to return without delay, and the rest of the Twelve and all the Elders that have gone out from this place, and as many more good faithful men as feel disposed to come up with them. Let wisdom be exercised, and whatever they do, do it without a noise. You know we are not frightened, but think it best to be well prepared and be ready for the onset; and if it is extermination— extermination it is of course. Communicate to the others of the Twelve with as much speed as possible, with perfect stillness and calmness. A word to the wise is sufficient, and a little powder, lead, and a good rifle can be packed in your luggage very easy without creating any suspicion.
“There must be no excuses made, for wisdom says that a strict compliance with this request will be for our safety and welfare.
“In haste I remain yours in the firm bonds of the new and everlasting covenant,
.
“Large bodies of armed men, cannon, and munitions of war, are coming on from in Steam boats. These facts are communicated to the , and of the , and you will readily see that we have to prepare for the onset.
“In the bonds of the new and everlasting covenant,
I remain Yours,
Joseph Smith.”
This morning I was arrested, together with , , , , , , , , , , , , , , and , by Constable , on a writ issued by , on a complaint of for a riot on the 10th inst. in destroying the Nauvoo Expositor press. At 2 P. M., we all went before at his [p. 110]
June 17 should come to to attack it unlawfully, and by mob force, a little annoyance upon the rear with some bold fellows would be a very good thing to weaken the ranks of an enemy. It is impossible to give you correct information what to do beforehand, but act according to the emergency of the case; but never give up your arms, but die first. The brethren will give you information of the conversation between us. We have sent to the , and are about to send again; and we want you to send affidavits and demand the attention of the , and request protection at his hand in common with the rest of us, that by our continual wearying, we may get him to come in and investigate the whole matter.
“I now conclude with my best wishes, and must refer you to the brethren for further information.
Joseph Smith, Mayor of the City of , and Lieutenant General of the Nauvoo Legion.”
My brother wrote the following letter to Prest. :—
“City of , June 17th, 1844.
“Dear Brother ,
“There has been for several days a great excitement among the inhabitants in the adjoining counties. Mass meetings are held upon mass meeting, drawing up resolutions to utterly exterminate the saints. The excitement has been gotten up by the Laws, Fosters, and the Higbees; and they themselves have left the , and are engaged in the mob. They have sent their runners into the State of to excite them to murder and bloodshed, and the report is that a great many hun[HC 6:486]dreds of them will come over to take an active part in murdering the saints. The excitement is very great indeed. It is thought best by myself and others for you to return without delay, and the rest of the Twelve and all the Elders that have gone out from this place, and as many more good faithful men as feel disposed to come up with them. Let wisdom be exercised, and whatever they do, do it without a noise. You know we are not frightened, but think it best to be well prepared and be ready for the onset; and if it is extermination— extermination it is of course. Communicate to the others of the Twelve with as much speed as possible, with perfect stillness and calmness. A word to the wise is sufficient, and a little powder, lead, and a good rifle can be packed in your luggage very easy without creating any suspicion.
“There must be no excuses made, for wisdom says that a strict compliance with this request will be for our safety and welfare.
“In haste I remain yours in the firm bonds of the new and everlasting covenant,
.
“Large bodies of armed men, cannon, and munitions of war, are coming on from in Steam boats. These facts are communicated to the , and of the , and you will readily see that we have to prepare for the onset.
“In the bonds of the new and everlasting covenant,
I remain Yours,
Joseph Smith.”
This morning I was arrested, together with , , , , , , , , , , , , , , and , by Constable , on a writ issued by , on a complaint of for a riot on the 10th inst. in destroying the Nauvoo Expositor press. At 2 P. M., we all went before at his [p. 110]
Page 110