History, 1838–1856, volume F-1 [1 May 1844–8 August 1844]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 120
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<​June 18​> and the other of , as reported, conversing together concerning incidents on the upper , when one said to the other— ‘if could have succeeded in getting an introduction for us to Jo Smith, Damn him, we would have gagged him and nabbed him, and damn him all hell could not have rescued him from our hands’. The next morning, got in conversation with the man before mentioned from who stated that he had been on the upper on business, that he stopped at on his way down with some twelve or fourteen other men, who laid a plan to kidnap Jo Smith, that some of the company queried about getting access to him, but one of them said he knew they could if he could find ; they called on in the evening to get an introduction to their great prophet, and went with them to the gate where they were stopped by the police, ‘and it was well for him that we did not succeed in getting an introduction to him’. said ‘did know your business?’ and he replied, “yes!” asked ‘what have you against Joseph Smith? did he ever injure you?’ the man replied, ‘no, but he has others’. Did you ever see him? ‘Yes, I was one who helped to run the Mormons from ’, and related many circumstances concerning the mob. said to the man he was acquainted with — considered he was an honorable man, and was led to doubt his being engaged with them in a conspiracy against Joseph Smith, he replied, ‘God damn you it is true whether you believe it or not’, and repeatedly affirmed it. did not believe the statements of the man from as mentioned above, until after hearing the recent developments before the City Council.
“Sworn and subscribed at the time and place above written before me.
L. S
, Recorder C. N.”
At 8 P. M, Wrote the following:—
, June 18th, 1844.
, Esq.
Sir;— I received your communication from per . Also ’s from , and I feel grateful for your favors, and congratulate you and also.
“The enemy, or mob, is prowling in the southern and eastern part of [HC 6:501] the , and threatening us with extermination; and we ask the friends of peace and good government every where, to use their influence in suppressing the spirit of mobocracy, and sustain us in our righteous course.
“So far as you can conscientously speak in our behalf, and lend your influence in our favor for the public good, your favors will be highly appreciated.
“Please show this to and such confidential friends as you think proper. Also request Mr. Dunlap to direct his letter to me.
“The bearer, , will give you all particulars
In haste I remain, your friend respectfully,
Joseph Smith.”
I sent the letter by to .
Nine messengers arrived from , and report that the mob had received intelligence from the , who would take no notice of them; and the mob damned the as being as bad as ‘Jo Smith’. They did not care for him, and they were just as willing he would not help them, as if he would.
There was a body of armed me in , and a mob meeting at which attracted considerable attention.
, a policeman, reported at 10 P. M, after I had retired, that [p. 120]
June 18 and the other of , as reported, conversing together concerning incidents on the upper , when one said to the other— ‘if could have succeeded in getting an introduction for us to Jo Smith, Damn him, we would have gagged him and nabbed him, and damn him all hell could not have rescued him from our hands’. The next morning, got in conversation with the man before mentioned from who stated that he had been on the upper on business, that he stopped at on his way down with some twelve or fourteen other men, who laid a plan to kidnap Jo Smith, that some of the company queried about getting access to him, but one of them said he knew they could if he could find ; they called on in the evening to get an introduction to their great prophet, and went with them to the gate where they were stopped by the police, ‘and it was well for him that we did not succeed in getting an introduction to him’. said ‘did know your business?’ and he replied, “yes!” asked ‘what have you against Joseph Smith? did he ever injure you?’ the man replied, ‘no, but he has others’. Did you ever see him? ‘Yes, I was one who helped to run the Mormons from ’, and related many circumstances concerning the mob. said to the man he was acquainted with — considered he was an honorable man, and was led to doubt his being engaged with them in a conspiracy against Joseph Smith, he replied, ‘God damn you it is true whether you believe it or not’, and repeatedly affirmed it. did not believe the statements of the man from as mentioned above, until after hearing the recent developments before the City Council.
“Sworn and subscribed at the time and place above written before me.
L. S
, Recorder C. N.”
At 8 P. M, Wrote the following:—
, June 18th, 1844.
, Esq.
Sir;— I received your communication from per . Also ’s from , and I feel grateful for your favors, and congratulate you and also.
“The enemy, or mob, is prowling in the southern and eastern part of [HC 6:501] the , and threatening us with extermination; and we ask the friends of peace and good government every where, to use their influence in suppressing the spirit of mobocracy, and sustain us in our righteous course.
“So far as you can conscientously speak in our behalf, and lend your influence in our favor for the public good, your favors will be highly appreciated.
“Please show this to and such confidential friends as you think proper. Also request Mr. Dunlap to direct his letter to me.
“The bearer, , will give you all particulars
In haste I remain, your friend respectfully,
Joseph Smith.”
I sent the letter by to .
Nine messengers arrived from , and report that the mob had received intelligence from the , who would take no notice of them; and the mob damned the as being as bad as ‘Jo Smith’. They did not care for him, and they were just as willing he would not help them, as if he would.
There was a body of armed me in , and a mob meeting at which attracted considerable attention.
, a policeman, reported at 10 P. M, after I had retired, that [p. 120]
Page 120